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Tri-Cities Opera presents Mozart's 'The Marriage of Figaro' Nov. 6, 8 in Binghamton
Julie Hamula and Cabiria Jacobsen speak with WSKG's Gregory Keeler
Tri-Cities Opera presents Mozart's 'The Marriage of Figaro' Nov. 6, 8 in Binghamton
Online interview audio now available Tri-Cities Opera presents
the Marriage of Figaro
by Mozart


Friday, Nov 6 - 8pm
Sunday, Nov 8 - 3pm

The Forum Theatre
Washington Street
Binghamton, NY

website: www.TriCitiesOpera.com

Listen to the full length OPERALOGUE Opera Preview for the Marriage of Figaro, as broadcast 11/3 on WSKG Radio

Susanna, maid and confidant of the Countess Rosina, and Figaro, the Count's personal valet, are getting married. However, Susanna suspects that the scheming Count will try to reinstate the droit du seigneur, the ancient privilege allowing the feudal lord to enjoy the first pleasures of the wedding night with any girl who marries within his domain. Meanwhile, Cherubino, a young page in love with love itself, harbors an obvious infatuation with the Countess. After the meddling music master Don Basilio exposes Cherubino's intentions to the Count, he subsequently orders Cherubino to report for military duty in Seville.

The Countess, hoping to win back her husband's wayward affections, plots with Susanna and Figaro to expose the Count's duplicity.

Figaro soon finds himself entangled in a dispute involving Marcellina and Dr. Bartolo. The magistrate, Don Curzio, rules that in reparation for not paying back a loan, Figaro must marry Marcellina. However, it then comes to light that Figaro is in fact the long-lost son of Marcellina and Bartolo. The happy group embrace and plans for a double wedding are made.

The gardener, Antonio, reveals to the Count that Cherubino has been disguised as a girl and has therefore not left the court. When the Count recognizes the page, the gardener's daughter Barbarina intervenes, threatening to expose the Count's attentions to her. The Count relents and pardons Cherubino. By this time, Susanna and the Countess have switched places and caused thorough confusion for the Count.

When evening arrives, the inevitable sorting out of identities leads to a truly comic scenario, after which the Count is exposed but is then lovingly forgiven by the Countess. All rejoice that the "day of madness" has ended in reconciliation.