Last updated 3:33AM ET
August 28, 2014
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PRI's The World: 8/27/2014 30 Mosques in 30 Days ? comedian Aman Ali visited a different mosque every day for a month and blogged about it. Also, Chinese calligraphy falls by the wayside as texting takes over. And the Times of London brings the sound of typewriters back to the newsroom ? for inspiration.
PRI's The World: 8/26/2014 Libya is back in the news as the UAE launches airstrikes against rebel militias in a move that surprised the United States. Plus, President Obama has authorized surveillance flights over Syria, which could be a precursor to air strikes against rebels there. And Marco goes to see one of four original copies of the Magna Carta, currently at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.
PRI's The World: 8/25/2014 Who is Theo Curtis? We hear from a friend of the American writer released yesterday by militants in Syria. Also, we get the details on the Nursa Front, the militant group that held Curtis for nearly two years. And we remember the late Richard Attenborough ? an Oscar-winning film director who saw himself as just a storyteller at heart.
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Ukraine rebels advance in south Pro-Russian rebels open a new front in south-east Ukraine and reportedly advance on the port of Mariupol, as Russia is accused of direct involvement.
Ebola outbreak 'will get worse' A top US public health official says the Ebola outbreak is set to get worse before it gets better, as West African health ministers meet in Ghana.
Missing plane search area refined Australia says the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 will focus on the southern part of the search area, after more data analysis.
The first day of school is when?
Back-to-school means different things in different states
How to sell your private data - if you really want to
There are a bunch of new ways you can sell your own data for profit.
Survey says: People don't trust pollsters anymore
As the way we use our phones changes, pollsters get left behind.
NPR Nation/World News