Last updated 8:06AM ET
June 23, 2017
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Telling the Story Station Overview
(2008-12-03)
(prndi) - Station Overview

In this section, you'll find the answers to the following questions:

What is the market size and format?
What are the basic demographics in the community?
Is it the only public radio station in the market?
Does it operate in HD? Does it stream live on line, podcast, archive on line etc?
Who is the licensee and how many employees does the station have? Is it a joint radio/TV licensee?
Does the station have anyone in charge of promotions?
How much promotion (TV, web, outside) is done for your local news features, awards?
How big is the web staff and is it in-house or outsourced?
Does the GM feel it's important to draw people to the local news presence on the website?

What is the market size and format?

KQED- top 50 news
KUOW -top 50 news
KWMU- top 50 news
KOPB - top 50 news
WPLN- top 50 news/classical
WKSU- 51-100 news/classical
WEVO- 100+ news (part of New Hampshire Public Radio network)
KSKA- 100+ news
KBIA- 150+ news/classical

What are the basic demographics in the community?

KQED- San Francisco, CA and Northern California - listeners are 52 percent male, 47% female. They're 66 percent caucasion, 12% Asian, 9% Latino and 5% black. Twenty one percent of KQED's listeners are between 18 and 34 years old. 37% are between 35 and 49.
KUOW- Seattle Washington, Puget Sound area - public radio classic, relatively high household income, equally divided between men and women
KWMU- St. Louis - pretty typical public radio demographic. Covering two different states- it's mostly based in Missouri but about 12 percent of its listeners are in Illinois. Listeners consist of a few more males than females, they're well educated, 75% are between the ages of 25 and 64, 90% are white and 7% African American.
KOPB- Portland, Oregon - Larger group of college educated people in Portland area than other areas - Oregon isn't particularly young - not anything demographically about Oregon that's any different from anywhere else in the country - but do have a much more involved and active listenership in the state
WPLN - Nashville, Tennessee - news/classical format, serves a racially mixed urban core (the state capitol) and relatively homogeneous suburbia and rural areas.
WKSU- Kent, Ohio, serving Northeastern Ohio from Cleveland to Akron to Canton - classical, folk, news and information, skews a little older and a little more blue collar
WEVO -Concord, New Hampshire - 50% 18-65 years old, 95% white, rural
KSKA - Anchorage, Alaska - very similar to NPR's demographics 42% between 35-54years old; 25% are 55-64 years old; trying to reach 25-34 audience; 58% have a college degree or more, and 25% have some college; about equal male/female listeners / Community demographics -50% white; the rest are Native American Indian, African American, multi-ethnic, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific Islander
KBIA - Columbia, Missouri - news /classical, slightly more male audience, roughly 10% minority, well-educated audience given that it is in a college town, a hotbed of heavy news consumers because the university is home to the Columbia School of Journalism

Is it the only public radio station in the market?

KQED- yes
KUOW- no, there is one other NPR station, 2 AAA stations and 1 eclectic community station
KWMU- no, there is a public radio station across the Mississippi River in our listening area. WSIE-FM is affiliated with Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville and its focus is jazz and student lab. Also, there's a "community-supported" radio station in St. Louis, KDHX-FM
KOPB- No. In Portland, there are three other public radio stations which are not operated by OPB: KBPS (classical); KMHD (jazz/blues); KBOO (community).
WPLN - no, there's a jazz/NPR station,1 community station, and low power stations at four areas colleges
WKSU- no, WCPN in Cleveland and WYCU in Youngstown
WEVO -no, weak Vermont Public Radio and Maine Public Radio station signals overlap
KSKA - no, it competes with KNBA in Anchorage, which is more of a public arts station
KBIA - no, one community station that carries public radio network programming in the mid-day

Does it operate in HD? Does it stream live on line, podcast, archive on line etc?

KQED-streams live, archives and podcasts, has RSS feeds and discussion forums, broadcasts on four channels in different cities, two of them operate in HD (no multi-casting as of summer 2008), a fifth channel broadcasts only on cable TV
KUOW- two FM stations which each operate two additional HD channels. All locally and regionally produced features are archived on line. The ten most recent stories and talk shows become podcasts. All channels are streamed live on line.
KWMU- offers an e-newsletter, podcasts, rss feeds, a discussion forum on its website, you can listen live, hear the latest local newscast, operates main channel in HD (no multi-casting as of summer 2008)
KOPB- yes and yes
WPLN - has FM and AM channels and two additional HD channels. It streams all four channels on-line. Everything produced by the station's news department is archived on-line and all feature length stories are podcast. The station provides a RSS feed of its newscast stories.
WKSU- has FM and AM channels and two additional HD channels. It streams all four channels on-line. Everything produced by the station's news department is archived on-line and all feature length stories are podcast. The station provides a RSS feed of its newscast stories.
WEVO -it does not operate in HD, it has 11 other stations in its network, it archives shows and stories on line, provides RSS feeds, podcasts and streams on line
KSKA - It does not operate in HD but is working on digital transmission in 2008. It does stream live online and podcasts.
KBIA - one FM station with two additional HD channels. On-line streaming of all three channels. News spots from the last few months and all news features are archived on-line. Podcasts of all news features, the week night "mini-programs" dealing with education, science, business, and the arts produced by the newsroom. The station also podcasts its weekly half-hour talk shows, all of which are produced outside the newsroom - two by Journalism School faculty.

Who is the licensee and how many employees does the station have? Is it a joint radio/TV licensee?

KQED- Northern California Public Broadcasting, a community licensee is the parent company for KQED Public Radio, KQED-TV, KQED.org and KQED Education Network has 275 regular employees and 20 fill-in and limited- term employees. This pay period (the number fluctuates), Radio has 63 employees.
KUOW- University of Washington, 61 full time staff plus part-timers and freelancers. Radio only.
KWMU- University of Missouri, St. Louis, 34 full time, 15 part-timers and 500 volunteers. Radio only.
KOPB- OPB is a private, nonprofit corporation without any ongoing financial support from the State of Oregon. OPB is a joint licensee with five television transmitters, 41 translator, 12 radio stations and another dozen or so translators. We have 172 FTE staff, 27 of whom are in the radio department (note that this radio headcount does not include engineering staff).
WPLN - radio only, community licensee, with 22 full and part-time employees
WKSU- Kent State University, 44 full time staff
WEVO - NHPR is a private non-profit. Currently it has 30+ employees. NHPR has a board of trustees and a community advisory board. Radio only.
KSKA - Koahnic Broadcast Corporation/ Alaska Public Telecommunications. 27 staff and volunteers. Radio only.
KBIA - University of Missouri, radio only, with 20 employees. The station also runs the University Concert Series, with 15 of the radio employees co-funded by the concert series and assuming dual-roles

Does the station have anyone in charge of promotions?

KQED-yes - radio promotion coordinator
KUOW- yes - the Assistant Program Director
KWMU- yes - two full-time staff in charge of marketing/promotion
KOPB- As a joint licensee, it does have a marketing department that handles promotions. The marketing department spends most of its resources on on-air promotion for TV, paid and free media, etc. On-air promotion is undertaken generally by the radio operations staff. We do cross promote between radio and television and vice versa.
WPLN - yes -internally it is the Program Director, externally it is the interim Marketing Director(s)
WKSU- yes, a Public Relations Director
WEVO - yes, a Marketing person.
KSKA - APTI has someone in charge of special events (if that is considered promotions). The radio staff is in charge of program promotion, but we don't have anyone in charge of promotions.
KBIA - yes, the Program Director is the point person, with station staff writing press releases for external use

How much promotion (TV, web, outside) is done for your local news features, awards?

KQED-We haven't tracked this in the past, but beginning in December, we have instituted a new work flow with our marketing/communications department. The news director alerts the department of any local stories of particular note as far in advance as possible. The marketing/communications department can determine whether any of their promotion devices are appropriate or possible (e-alerts, note to other news outlets, etc.). We do notify this department of awards and personnel changes. It needs to be a major award to warrant a press release. Staff changes are forwarded to appropriate industry publications such as Current.
KUOW-sometimes a press release is sent out, a series or special features are promoted on air for a week or ten days
KWMU-They will send out press releases whenever the newsroom has information to share, such as awards, special news series, etc.
KOPB- We promote our daily talk show (Think Out Loud) on TV with a nightly spot. We promote news extensively on our web site. Local radio feature promotion is geared primarily to special stories and series, which are heavily promoted. Otherwise, local features are included in forward promotion and handled much the same way as upcoming features from the network shows. When it comes to awards, we send out basic press releases and highlight them in our monthly member guide.
WPLN - usually a press release is sent to the local papers. On-line we have a page dedicated to award-winning news stories.
WKSU- PR/marketing does a great job in getting out the web about awards. But for news features, not enough promotion. It's mostly done for series or by enterprising reporters for their feature work.
WEVO - They send out press releases and post them on the website
KSKA - Program Director Bede Trantina says, "Not enough. References on air to the award winning "AK" and during our two membership drives a year, we really talk up the fine news staff and first rate work our reporter do."
KBIA - press releases about awards are sent, but the News Director feels more could be done to promote features, series, etc. on-air and off.

How big is the web staff and is it in-house or outsourced?

KQED- it has an entire division call KQED Interactive since 1994 serving as a community convener, providing event listings, resources, online polls, podcasts, blogs and other items of timely interest. KQED Interactive functions as KQED's third media platform, delivering content specifically acquired and produced for the Web. It employs 12 people plus a Radio Internet Editor.
KUOW- 3 people in- house who fall under the Asst. GM who also deals with all financial matters including membership
KWMU- one director of interactive media in-house who reports to the Administrative Manager (basically the Associate GM) plus one other staff member.
KOPB- There are 8 full-time staff that work exclusively on the web. All web work is handled internally, except in extraordinary situations.
WPLN - Web site work is in-house, with one staff member who also works weekend shifts
WKSU- The station has an IT staff of three, with one dedicated web developer
WEVO -one person whose job is maintaining our web presence, but the news staff and those of our talk shows add their own content to the web site
KSKA - one person was hired in 2008 to work on their website
KBIA - program director is the web guy

Does the GM feel it's important to draw people to the local news presence on the website?

KQED-the above answer should explain that!
KUOW- They're cautious about it, says GM Wayne Roth, "We try to not call people to the website specifically unless there's really something special to see or there's something more than a mindless repetition of the dot org."
KWMU- He says it's vital as well as for the website to direct people back to the on-air product
KOPB-yes
WPLN - Absolutely. GM Rob Gordon says, "Our audience uses the web to read and listen to what they missed, and to see additional information - a value-added experience. It's the content we can provide that's unique, that they can't get anywhere else."
WKSU- Yes, GM Al Bartholet has this theory: "In typical radio you have sort of a mono form of communication - we communicate to them, and there's not a lot of opportunity for feedback. We provide our listeners opportunities to give feedback on our stories that we have on the web. People can comment on them. And the more time people spend with you as an organization, if they get on the web that's more time that they are spending with your product. And that increases their definition of value and increases the likelihood that they will find you a significant entity and institutional they will support financially."
KSKA - yes
WEVO -yes
KBIA - GM Mike Dunn says, "It's important to draw folks to the web site. Absolutely."
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