Last updated 8:47PM ET
September 2, 2014
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PRI's The World: 9/02/2014 We have the latest on the apparent beheading American hostage Steven Sotloff. Plus, NATO says it will send thousands of troops to eastern Europe in light of the crisis in Ukraine. Russia has countered by calling NATO a threat and vowing to change its military doctrine in response. And a photographer who grew up on a farm in Iowa and then moved overseas to ply his trade. He's now back after years away, photographing his own country with fresh eyes.
PRI's The World: 9/01/2014 Anti-government protestors stormed the state television headquarters in Islamabad, Pakistan. Authorities have restored order but the demonstration raises fears of a coup. Also, new proposals to deal with so-called "home-grown extremists" in the UK. And a Liberian DJ who's dedicated himself to spreading health messages about Ebola.
PRI's The World: 8/29/2014 The UK raises its terror alert level from "substantial" to "severe" in light of the developments in Syria and Iraq. Also, a weapons researcher analyzes online photos and videos for clues to the wars in Ukraine and the Middle East. And the Hello Kitty phenomenon and its roots.
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Islamic State 'kills US hostage' An Islamic State video purporting to show the beheading of Steven Sotloff, a US journalist abducted by the group, is released.
Million 'have fled Ukraine conflict' The number of people who have fled the fighting in Ukraine has doubled in weeks, and the UN says more than a million have now been displaced.
Celebrity leaks 'no breach' - Apple The leaking of intimate photos of celebrities from iCloud accounts was due to a theft of log-in information, not a security breach, says Apple.
Forget ketchup. How about foie gras mousse?
Chicago restaurants elevate hot dogs to gourmet status.
What a House majority leader brings to banking
Eric Cantor will be paid more than $3 million a year by an investment bank.
Angelo Mozilo really doesn't get it
Angelo Mozilo wants to know why people still think he's a villain.
NPR Nation/World News