Last updated 2:21AM ET
December 16, 2017
KSUT Regional
KSUT Regional
Durango Council Dumps IDO
(2008-02-20)
(ksut) - HOST LEAD: The debate over growth has taken a new turn in Durango.
City council has dumped plans to enact an Interim Development Ordinance, after spending thousands of dollars to draft the IDO and months considering the measure.
KSUT's Victor Locke reports.

VICTOR: The Interim Development Ordinance was designed to require developers to pay their fair share for public improvements, primarily streets, that might be needed as a result of their projects.
It would have been in effect until later this year, when council hopes to adopt what's known as an Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance or APFO.
That would address infrastructure needs to serve new development on a permanent basis.
The IDO came under fire during a January 8th meeting, where it was criticized by many as an effort to slow or stop growth.
In the wake of that criticism, withdrawal of the IDO last night was recommended by city manager Ron LeBlanc.
He told them it really isn't needed any more council can already require developers to "pay their way" without an IDO.
LEBLANC: WE CAN'T PROJECT EVERYTHING THAT MAY COME FORWARD, BUT FROM WHAT WE KNOW TODAY THAT'S COMING DOWN THE PIPELINE, MOST OF THE LARGER DEVELOPMENTS WOULD BE ANNEXATIONS AND YOU STILL RETAIN THE POWERS, CONSIDERABLE POWERS GIVEN TO YOU BY THE CHARTER AND BY THE STATE TO DEAL WITH THOSE ANNEXATIONS.
Councilor Doug Lyon, a vocal opponent of the IDO agreed.
LYON: NO ORDINANCE, AN IDO FOR INSTANCE, GIVES US MORE POWER THAN AN ANNEXATION. IF THERE IS AN ANNEXATION COMING TO THE CITY COUNCIL, WE CAN NEGOTIATE VIRTUALLY ANYTHING WE WANT.
Councilor Leigh Meigs, an early proponent of the IDO, said she now feels it could hurt efforts to work with the county at controlling growth outside city limits, which also impacts city traffic problems.
MEIGS: WITHIN THE COUNTY, THAT'S WHERE THE REAL CONCERN ABOUT SPRAWL EXISTS, AND SO WE NEED TO EXTEND OUR REACH AND WE CAN DO THAT BEST IF SOMEBODY IS OUT THERE REACHING BACK TOWARDS US.
One of the biggest supporters of the IDO, Councilor Renee Parsons, said she'd reluctantly agree to the IDO's withdrawal charging it was subject to delay tactics which have made it irrelevent.
PARSONS: AND I'M NOT HAPPY FRANKLY WITH THE WAY THE PROCESS EVOLVED. I THINK STAFF COULD HAVE, SHOULD HAVE PERHAPS DONE A BETTER JOB ON THIS.
Council voted 5-0 to drop the IDO idea.
Attention is now expected to turn toward the public facilities ordinance, with public meetings and hearings expected to begin next month and continue through the Spring, with possible approval in late June.
From KSUT, Four Corners Public Radio, I'm Victor Locke.
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