The requested resource (/media/ksut/header/pb/header.html) is not available
Last updated 2:50AM ET
December 11, 2017
KSUT Regional
KSUT Regional
Spotlight On DIFF Part 2
(2008-02-19)
Director Socheata Poeuv and her father in Cambodia. (Courtesy: New Year Baby)
(ksut) - More than 300 films were screened by Durango Independent Film Festival Staff for this years festival.
104 of those made the cut.
Among the ten full length features is one entitled New Year Baby.
(SOUND)
In her personal documentary, Socheata Poeuv, a former ABC and NBC journalist, seeks to learn how her parents, two sisters and brother survived the Cambodian genocide of the mid 70's, at the hands of the Khmer Rouge.
She takes her parents on a journey back to the killing fields, the interment camp where her parents met and were united in an arranged marriage, and ultimately, to the refugee camp in Thailand where she was born, on the Cambodian New Years Day, April 13.
During the trip she learns the secrets of her parents relationship, of how her father was dedicated to saving them all.
(SOUND)
The film is bilingual, with subtitles.
It is one of several films being presented this year that tell an emotional, hard hitting story.
JULAIN: THINGS THAT WILL PULL YOUR HEARTSTRINGS, THAT WILL MAKE YOU LAUGH THAT WILL MAKE YOU CRY. THAT YOU'LL FEEL EVERY EMOTION, FROM START TO FINISH. WE HAVE A LITTLE BIT OF SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE.
Jane Julian is the festival's programming and screening Director.
She says while the festival offers a lot of films that tug at your heartstrings, it also offers more, for people of all ages.
JULIAN: THERE'S DOCUMENTARIES, FEATURE FILMS, SHORTS, THEY HAVE ANIMATED SHORTS AND LIVE ACTION SHORTS, SHORT DOCS AND FEATURE LENGTH DOCS, AND FEATURE FILMS. THEN THERE'S A FILM PROGRAM CALLED THE FAMILY PROGRAM THAT'S GEARED TOWARD CHILDREN AND THEIR PARENTS THAT CAN COME AND SEE FILMS THAT ARE A LITTLE BIT MORE GEARED TOWARD THEIR AGE GROUP, AND THEN WE HAVE AN ADVENTURE SPORT PROGRAM.
How does DIFF achieve that balance?
There are several different screening committees, comprised entirely of volunteers, who view all 300 films submitted.
Robb Brantley is one of those volunteers.
He is on the Shorts Screening Committee, which he describes as a demographically diverse group of people who brought a broad perspective to table.
BRANTLEY: SOMETIMES WE WOULD WATCH A FILM AND ONE OF US MAY NOT HAVE GOTTEN THAT FILM, WHEREAS ANOTHER MEMBER OF THE SCREENING COMMITTEE WENT, OH NO, THIS IS PERFECT, THIS SO SPEAKS TO MY DEMOGRAPHIC, OR TO MY AGE GROUP, OR MY GENERATION, WHATEVER IT WAS.
Committee members, Brantley says, soon learned first impressions of a film, weren't always correct.
BRANTLEY: AS OUR SHORT SCREENING COMMITTEE, WE LIKED TO WATCHED SHORTS TOGETHER SO WE COULD TALK ABOUT THEM. AND INITIALLY WE WOULD WATCH A FILM AND INITIALLY WE WOULDN'T NECESSARILY BE OVERWHELMED OR CRAZY ABOUT IT, BUT THEN WE'D REALIZE WE SPENT TWENTY MINUTES TALKING ABOUT THAT FILM: YOU KNOW, WHAT DID THAT MEAN, HOW DID THAT WORK, WHAT DID SHE SAY WHEN SHE DID THIS OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT, AND WE'D GET TO THE END OF OUR TWENTY MINUTES AND WE'D REALIZE THAT'S EXACTLY WHAT WE WANT THAT FILM TO DO. SO THAT IF WE CAN SPEND TWENTY MINUTES TALKING ABOUT IT, WE KNOW THAT AUDIENCE MEMBERS WILL COME OUT OF THAT MOVIE AND TALK ABOUT IT, SO THAT WOULD SOMETIMES INFLUENCE US. WHAT WAS OUR REACTION, YOU CAN'T TAKE YOUR IMMEDIATE, DID I LIKE IT, DID I NOT LIKE IT, BECAUSE AGAIN, THAT'S NOT WHAT ART IS ABOUT.
(SOUND)
New Year Baby, like many films featured at this years Durango Independent Film Festival, has won numerous awards, including the highest human rights cinema award, the "Movies that Matters" human rights award from Amnesty International.
It's also slated to be broadcast later this year on PBS.
From KSUT, Four Corner's Public Radio, I'm Victor Locke.
© Copyright 2017, ksut