Last updated 2:51AM ET
December 11, 2017
KSUT Regional
KSUT Regional
Stanton Englehart A Life on Canvas Is Released
(2007-12-27)
(ksut) - HOST LEAD: A just published art book tells a story of the four corners, women, life and generosity.

KSUT's Sarah Baumgartner has that story.

PAT ENGLEHART: IT'S STANTON ENGLEHART A LIFE ON CANVAS, BUT IT REPRESENTS SOMETHING MORE LIKE HE KIND OF STANDS FOR THE HEART OF THE COMMUNITY.
SARAH: Pat Englehart shares artwork and stories about her husband of 59 years, Stanton Englehart. Stanton is a well-known artist, teacher and creator in the four corners area. His unique and most recognizable landscape paintings as well as others can be found at libraries, courthouses, Fort Lewis College and even in your local offices. Stanton himself donated the majority of these pieces.
To commemorate his work, the book Stanton Englehart: A Life on Canvas is on bookshelves today.
With the help of his wife Pat, the Durango Art Center, the Fort Lewis College Foundation, editor and writer Jules Masterjohn, personal friends, community members and even complete strangers donated their time and money in this book to ensure that Stanton's art will carry on indefinitely.
Stanton was an art teacher at Fort Lewis College for close to 30 years. Nearly 90% of the proceeds from the book will go to the Stanton Englehart Scholarship Fund for art students at the College.
Editor Jules Masterjohn tells us why A life on Canvas is much more that just your average coffee table book.
JULES MASTERJOHN: I MEAN THERE'S THREE LEVELS. WE MADE A BOOK, WHICH IS VERY COOL. WE HAVE A PHYSICAL RECORD OF STANTON'S WORK AND IT'S ALL PUT TOGETHER SO YOU CAN SIT WITH IT. THAT'S A VERY BEAUTIFUL THING IN ITSELF. AND THEN IT ALSO CELEBRATES THE LIFE OF SOMEBODY WHO IS VERY LOVED IN THIS COMMUNITY AS A TEACHER AS A CITIZEN AND AS AN ARTIST AND SO THAT WAS ANOTHER LEVEL OF DEEP SATISFACTION. BUT THE THIRD PART OF IT IS THAT THE BOOK PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE SCHOLARSHIP FUND SO STANTON'S LOVE FOR ART AND LOVE FOR TEACHING IS PASSED ON.
The book is full of little details that encompass Stanton's work. The cover is made from the same linen that he used on his canvases. Embossed in the cover is Stanton's signature. When you crack open either side of the hardback book, Stanton's favorite color, vibrant canyon red emerges from the pages.
A few years ago, Stanton developed dementia and has not painted in over eight months.
With his wife as my tour guide of the studio outside of their home in Durango, I walked into the two-story workspace only to see old fly-fishing poles, lures, four well-used bikes hanging on walls and from the ceiling. The room adjacent to the entrance smells like old musty paint and is full of paintings and a workbench. On the paint-splattered workbench sits coffee cans and old jars filled with paintbrushes whose bristles have been nearly worn down to the handle. A narrow flight of stairs leads into yet another crowded room of Stanton's work. Pat relays the importance of the book to both of them.
PAT: BUT WE WERE BOTH WANTING TO HOLD THE BOOK, THE BOOK TO HOLD IT IN OUR HANDS. PROOF THAT IT ACTUALLY EXISTS BECAUSE WE WANTED IT SO BADLY IN TIME FOR STANTON TO ENJOY IT. AND HE DOES. HE LOOKS AT IT. THE ONE IN THE HOUSE IS RIGHT BY HIS CHAIR. HE'S HOLDING IT HALF THE TIME NOW. SO YEAH, IT'S IMPORTANT.
Stanton's friend and former Fort Lewis College president Joel Jones wrote the forward in the book.
JOEL JONES: FUNDAMENTALLY I THINK THEY'LL FIND A DIFFERENT STANTON. THAT IS MOST PEOPLE KNOW STANTON, MANY PEOPLE KNOW STANTON ONLY FOR HIS LANDSCAPES. BUT IN THE BOOK THERE'S THAT WHOLE SERIES OF WHAT HE CALLS BOUND WOMEN. WHERE HE TALKS ABOUT COORALATES IF YOU WILL, THE OPPRESSION OF WOMEN WITH OUR DISRESPECT FOR NATURE. THERE ARE THE ANIMAL PAINTINGS THAT I THINK VERY FEW PEOPLE HAVE SEEN THAT ALSO HAVE THEIR OWN MEANING. IT'S REALLY A BEAUTIFUL PORTRAYAL, PROFILE OF HIS WHOLE RANGE IF YOU WILL, WHICH A LOT OF US NEVER SAW.
After almost 4 years since the idea of the book was conceived, it finally became a reality in early December of this year. The book, which includes a 25-minute documentary on DVD, also comes in time for Stanton's art exhibit at the Anasazi Heritage Center in Dolores. The 62-piece showcase ends on March 30th 2008. Stanton's work can also be seen at Toh-Atin Gallery in Durango.
Stanton Englehart: A Life on Canvas can be purchased locally at Maria's Bookshop, Durango Arts Center, Toh-Atin art Gallery, A Shared Blanket, the Anasazi Heritage Center and online at stantonenglehartbook.com.
PAT: THE ARTIST SHOW UP EVERY PLACE. IT DOESN'T MATTER IF HE WAS SHOVELING SNOW, HE WOULD HAVE SHOVELED IT IN AN ARTISTIC PATTERN. ITS JUST A PART OF HIS LIFE IT'S LIKE HIS BREATHING. THAT'S WHO HE IS. HE SEES THINGS IN A SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT WAY AND HE DOES THINGS IN A SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT WAY.

From KSUT, Four Corners Public Radio, I'm Sarah Baumgartner.
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