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Last updated 9:40PM ET
December 14, 2017
KSUT Regional
KSUT Regional
Banned Books Week
(2007-10-05)
(ksut) - HOST LEAD: Book censorship and book burning is not just a thing of the past, it continues today.
Area libraries and bookstores are celebrating the 26th annual Banned Books Week.
KSUT's Sarah Baumgartner reports:

SARAH: Banned Books Week is celebrated annually during the first week of October.
It's sponsored by The American Library Association and other organizations such as the American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression.
It's a week when libraries and bookstores highlight many of the books banned throughout the years.
Cindy Shimizu is librarian at the Ignacio Public Library.
She says they're celebrating banned books week, and they have concerns about the future.
CINDY SHIMIZU: WE'RE PRETTY NEW IN OUR BUILDING SO WE'RE JUST GETTING OUR PROGRAMS GOING. WE DIDN'T HAVE TIME TO PULL A PROGRAM TOGETHER FOR BANNED BOOK WEEK, BUT WE DID PUT A COUPLE OF DISPLAYS TOGETHER THAT SHOW SOME OF THE BOOKS THAT HAVE BEEN HISTORICALLY BANNED. WE'VE BEEN FORTUNATE NOT TO HAVE CHALLENGES WE HAVEN'T REALLY HAD A LOT OF CHALLENGES TO OUR COLLECTION BUT I EXPECT THAT WITH OUR GROWTH MORE PEOPLE COMING IN WE WILL GET MORE CHALLENGES. WE'RE JUST KIND OF BRACING OURSELVES.
Some books historically banned include: Harry Potter, the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Color Purple, Maya Angelou's I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, Dr. Suess' The Lorax, Catcher in the Rye, and To Kill a Mocking Bird, to name a few.
Durango's Maria's Bookshop is also celebrating Banned Books Week.
Libby Cowels, Maria's Events Coordinator says they've categorized their displays.
LIBBY COWELS: SO WHAT WE'VE DONE IS WE'VE GROUPED TITLES TOGETHER BASED UPON THE CHALLENGED THAT THEY FACED. SO SOME OF THEM HAVE BEEN CALLED RACIST, SOME OF THEM HAVE BEEN CHALLENGED BECAUSE THEY SUPPOSEDLY PROMOTE A HOMOSEXUAL AGENDA. SOME OF THEM HAVE BEEN CALLED TOO VIOLENT. ET CETERA.
With the celebration of reading banned books, the question arises: what is the difference between a library restricting access to an Internet website and banning a book?
In Shimizu's opinion, banning either violates first amendment rights.
SHIMIZU: WELL I THINK A BANNED BOOK REALLY IS SO MUCH MORE FUNDAMENTAL TO THE LIFE OF THE LIBRARY. THE FIRST AMENDMENT I MEAN CERTAINLY WEBSITES AND THE INTERNET COME UNDER THE FIRST AMENDMENT AS WELL BUT I THINK IT'S SO MUCH EASIER TO PUT OFFENSIVE MATERIAL THINGS THAT ACTUALLY DO COME UNDER THE HEADING OF PORNOGRAPHY ON THE WEB, THAN JUST THE WRITTEN WORD. I THINK THE WRITTEN WORD IS IMPORTANT TO KEEP TRUE TO OUR CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS.
According to the American Library Associations' web site, groups that are most likely to challenge books are schools, School Libraries and community members.
In addition to Ignacio, The Durango public Library also has a display marking Banned Books Week, which runs through tomorrow.

From KSUT, Four Corners Public Radio, I'm Sarah Baumgartner.

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