KPLU Public NewsRoom Archive



The Oil Bubble (2008-09-25)
When it comes to the troubles plaguing our economy, a lot of attention is being paid to bank failures and bailouts. But don't forget about oil prices. In this month's conversation, Strategic News Service publisher Mark Anderson tells KPLU's Dave Meyer about hot money and the oil bubble.


Cardiac arrest survival varies by city (2008-09-24)
If your heart were to suddenly stop beating, you're five times more likely to be revived in King County than in some other parts of America. It's partially a tribute to how many people here know CPR. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld has more:


Surviving cardiac arrest more likely in Seattle (2008-09-24)
Surviving cardiac arrest - when your heart suddenly stops -- is more than a matter of luck. Researchers at Harborview Medical Center say your chances depend on the care you receive - which in turn depends on where you live. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld has more from the headquarters of Medic One:


Food for Thought: Recipes (2008-09-24)
Do you follow the directions closely when trying out a new recipe or do you feel free to make changes on the fly? On this week's Food for Thought Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein compare their levels of faithfulness to a recipe's directives.


Relisting the Wolves (2008-09-24)
The Justice Department has asked a Montana judge to formally put the gray wolf back on the Endangered Species List. KPLU's Doug Nadvornick reports.


Western States Agree on Plan to Tackle Global Warming Pollution (2008-09-24)
West Coast states have settled on a sweeping plan to tackle global warming pollution at the regional level. A regulatory framework unveiled yesterday (Tuesday) will put a price on burning fossil fuels for electricity, heating, or transportation. State lawmakers will get the final say in how soon and how much it'll cost you to combat climate change. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


NW Home to Some of the Most Overvalued Homes (2008-09-23)
A national real estate report claims the Northwest remains a pocket of extremely overvalued homes. Bend, (Oregon)... Longview and Wenatchee, (Washington)... along with the Portland metro area rank near the top for overheated home prices. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Campaign for Affordable Bank Accounts (2008-09-23)
It was an unusual sight this week: a room full of smiling bankers. Seattle launched a new initiative that put them in a good mood: a campaign to provide affordable bank accounts for low-income people. The goal is to steer them away from high-fee check cashing services and payday lenders. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Bush Bailout Package Gets Cool Reception from NW Lawmakers (2008-09-23)
Northwest lawmakers are giving the Bush administration's 700 billion dollar economic aid package a cool reception. KPLU's Chris Lehman has a round-up of Congressional reactions.


Political Identity: A Historical Look at Leaders Who Have Challenged Our Notions of Who Can Be President (2008-09-22)
In the McCain/Obama race no matter who is elected - a barrier will be broken. And because we're hearing so much about barrier breaking these days, it's easy to forget how seldom that's happened in our presidential history. Today we'll take a look at those who have challenged our notions of who can be president --- and how they did it. In part four of our series Looking Back to Look Forward, KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has our story.


Forest Service Officer is 5th Killed (2008-09-22)
For the fifth time in two years, a Washington State law enforcement officer has been killed by a criminal out on probation. The latest incident happened this weekend when a Forest Service police officer was gunned down on the Olympic Peninsula. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more on this story.


Community Banks Faring Well (2008-09-22)
With the fate of Seattle's Washington Mutual Bank hanging in the balance, many people may be wondering if their money would be safer at smaller institutions. The short answer is no - although community banks have emerged as safer investments for people buying and selling their stock. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp explains.


Hunting Season (2008-09-22)
Today is the first day of autumn, and for more than two hundred thousand people in Washington State that means one thing - hunting season. KPLU's Shirley Skeel checked out the season ahead.


Gray Wolf Listing (2008-09-22)
The gray wolf may be put back on the Endangered Species List. That's an option facing federal wildlife officials, after challenges to wolf management plans in the Northwest. More now from KPLU's Doug Nadvornick.


Seattle Launches Bank On Initiative (2008-09-22)
More than fifty-thousand households in King County don't have bank accounts. A new initiative seeks to change that. It's nothing to do with the current financial crisis - it's about helping people avoid high-fee check cashing services and payday lenders. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


WA Voters Have a Stark Choice in Treasurers' Race (2008-09-22)
Washington State Treasurer Mike Murphy is retiring after 3-terms in office. Deputy Treasurer Allan Martin, a Republican, wants the job. So does Democratic state lawmaker Jim McIntire. The stakes are high. The Treasurer plays a key role in managing more than a HUNDRED BILLION dollars for the state. In this edition of our voters' guide, KPLU's Austin Jenkins profiles the race for Washington State Treasurer.


Art Thiel on New UW Athletic Director (2008-09-19)
The University of Washington football team is smarting from a 0-3 start to their season. The team has a bye' this weekend, after a painful home loss to Oklahoma last Saturday. If the Huskies are to turn their fortunes around, it will take more than just the players and coaches. This week the U-W hired Scott Woodward as it's new athletic director. KPLU's Gary Davis asked Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel to tell us more about Woodward, and the pressures he'll face.


UW Support Staff Rally for Higher Pay (2008-09-19)
University of Washington support staff want higher pay and more respect. The union representing everything from administrative assistants to medical staff rallied outside a Board of Regents meeting. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt was there:


National Park(ing) Day in Seattle (2008-09-19)
The number of green spaces in Seattle is about to rise dramatically. In celebration of today's (Friday's) National Park Day, parking spots around the city are being transformed into spaces that people, not cars, can use. KPLU's Shirley Skeel explains.


The Spanking Debate (2008-09-19)
Most new parents wonder how they should discipline their child. Tonight and tomorrow, more than one-thousand parents are expected to attend a parenting class at the Seattle area Mars Hill Church.

But as KPLU's Jennifer Wing tells us, the church is facing a lot of criticism for the person who will be giving out the advice. His name is Ted Tripp, and he firmly believes that "sparing the rod spoils the child."


Red Mountain Winemakers Want A New Freeway Interchange (2008-09-19)
It takes good grapes to make great wine. But it takes good roads to get tourists there to buy it. This week, Eastern Washington officials are asking Governor Chris Gregoire to pay for a new freeway interchange for Red Mountain. KPLU's Anna King reports.


State Deficit Grows (2008-09-19)
Washington State's projected budget deficit has climbed to more than THREE BILLION dollars. That's the result of another gloomy tax revenue forecast released Thursday. But the candidates for Governor won't say how they plan fill the gaping shortfall. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Scientists Drill Wells to Understand How Uranium Moves (2008-09-18)
At the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, scientists are drilling not for oil, but for the environment. They want to see how uranium moves in the groundwater just paces from the Columbia River. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Salmon Disaster Aid Pipeline Opened (2008-09-18)
The federal government says it hopes to begin mailing checks on October 1st to commercial fishermen, charter boat captains, and related businesses affected by this year's sharp cutbacks in ocean salmon fishing. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


WA I-1000: Two Widows on Opposing Sides of Assisted Suicide (2008-09-18)
This November, Washington State voters will decide whether to adopt an Oregon-style assisted suicide law. Initiative 1000 would allow terminally ill patients to request a lethal dose of drugs from their doctor. In this edition of our voters' guide, KPLU's Austin Jenkins profiles two widows. They've both witnessed death up close, but have formed opposite views on this issue.


Lessons Learned From Financial Chaos (2008-09-18)
There's a lot of chaos in the financial markets these days. Each week seems to bring news of yet another bank failure, buyout, or bailout. There are some important lessons to learn from these troubled times. KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Food for Thought: Putting Up You Own Food (2008-09-17)
On this week's Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson asserts that yes -- she can can.


Buzz About WaMu's Future (2008-09-17)
All the turmoil on Wall Street has many people wondering about the future of Seattle-based Washington Mutual. Several news outlets are citing unidentified sources saying WaMu has put itself up for sale. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Gay Jamaican Immigration Detainee Wins Appeal (2008-09-17)
A gay immigration detainee from Oregon has won a key court battle. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals found that Damion Bromfield would likely face persecution if deported back to Jamaica. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


SEIU Pushes Home Healthcare Ballot Measure (2008-09-17)
This November, Washington State voters will decide three ballot measures. One of them is I-1029. Backed by the largest labor union in the state, it would dramatically increase the training requirements for community-based long-term-care workers. Supporters say more training will lead to better care. Critics call the initiative unnecessary. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports in this installment of our voters' guide.


Unemployment Rate Rising Despite Growth in Jobs (2008-09-17)
Washington's jobless rate hit 6% in August. That's up from 5.6% in July - and it's the state's highest rate of unemployment in nearly four years. But the news isn't all bad - the number of jobs in the state is actually still growing. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp explains.


Nightclub Tax Break (2008-09-17)
Putting more money in musician's pockets. Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels says that's the goal of a tax break he's proposing. KPLU's Paula Wissel has a report.


State Jobless Rate Up (2008-09-16)
Washington's unemployment rate jumped to six percent in August - up from five point six percent in July. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Looking Back to Look Forward: The Economy in Presidential Elections (2008-09-16)
It's the number-one issue for most voters: the economy. How it's affecting people's pocketbooks and what the candidates say they'll do about it has influenced electoral outcomes throughout the ages. In this week's installment of Looking Back to Look Forward, KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp examines some of the more radical economic programs of past U. S. Presidents - and the light they shed on the current election.


Federal Government to Fine Contractor (2008-09-16)
The U.S. Department of Energy says it plans to fine a Hanford Nuclear Reservation contractor more than 40-thousand dollars. The government is punishing the company because it fired an employee who raised safety concerns. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Grocery Prices Up (2008-09-16)
Bought an apple lately? Or a gallon of milk? Then you probably won't be surprised by new numbers that show grocery prices in our region are up eight percent over last year. We sent KPLU's Paula Wissel out to see how the news is playing at the supermarket.


Unemployment Rate Rising Despite Growth in Jobs (2008-09-16)
Washington's jobless rate hit 6% in August. That's up from 5.6% in July - and it's the state's highest rate of unemployment in nearly four years. But the news isn't all bad - the number of jobs in the state is actually still growing. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp explains.


Ad Watch: Republicans Blast Gregoire for Tribal Gaming Pact (2008-09-16)
A new ad in the Washington State governor's race accuses Democrat Chris Gregoire of cutting a sweetheart deal with tribal casinos. The ad goes on to say Gregoire then benefited from hundreds of thousands of dollars in political contributions from tribes. KPLU's Austin Jenkins checks out the allegations.


Quincea eras Are Becoming A Big Deal For Northwest Latino Girls (2008-09-15)
We're all familiar with tradeshows and conventions for brides. Now, Latino girls have their own show to help them plan their coming-of-age event. It's a Quincea era convention. One was held in Pasco recently. KPLU's Anna King explores the convergence of Latino traditions and American commercialism.


Good Timing for King County Bus Service Expansion (2008-09-15)
Crowded buses got you down? Relief is on the way. Just in time for increased fall traffic, King County Metro has announced its largest expansion of bus service in seven years. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Designing the Perfect, Personalized Apple (2008-09-15)
You've heard about the Human Genome Project, but probably not the Apple Genome Project. It'll never be as famous. But it's a serious goal of scientists here in Washington, and collaborators around the world. They're helping orchardists come up with new varieties. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld recently met with one of the leaders on the project:


History Suggests How WA Gubernatorial Candidates Will Balance Budget (2008-09-15)
Washington State faces a shortfall of nearly three-billion-dollars in the next two year budget cycle. In the race for Washington governor, both candidates refuse to say how they will close that deficit if elected. But Dino Rossi and Chris Gregoire have faced budget shortfalls before. Now, their budget-balancing records have become a key issue in this year's campaign. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


North Seattle Schools Face Squeeze (2008-09-15)
It wasn't that long ago when closing down schools in the Seattle School District was in the news.Low enrollment was to blame. Now, in several neighborhoods in the north end of the city, the district is facing the opposite problem. More from KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing. District Meetings: Monday at Catherine Blaine 6:30- 8:30 Tuesday at Roosevelt High School 6:30- 8:30


Libraries for All Reports Back to Community (2008-09-12)
Ten years ago, Seattle voters said yes to the largest library initiative in the country. Now, the $196-million dollar Libraries for All bond-measure is complete and has become a model for communities around the world. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Art Thiel on Seahawks Start (2008-09-12)
The football season has officially kicked off for local teams, both college and pro. And it's been a rough start. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel says all is not lost, at least for the Seattle Seahawks. He spoke with KPLU's Gary Davis.


Bellevue Teachers Rally (2008-09-12)
The Bellevue School District has upped its offer to striking teachers with a 5 percent raise. Union officials called it a move in the right direction. And teachers came together for a rally today to mark 2 weeks of the strike. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt was there:


Passport to Libraries for All (2008-09-12)
Seattle's new Central Public Library has been a tourist destination since the snazzy steel-and-glass building was completed four years ago. Now, the system is inviting people to make a hobby of visiting all 27 of its new and remodeled branches. It's part of this weekend's festivities to commemorate the completion of the city's 10-year Libraries for All program. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp has the story.


Not Taking Teachers to Court (2008-09-12)
The Bellevue School District doesn't want to use the courts to force striking teachers back to work. They want to negotiate a settlement, despite the likelihood that the courts would side with the district, and that would be a fast way to get school started. More now from KPLU education reporter Chana Joffe-Walt.


Changing Prison Culture (2008-09-12)
It's an attempt to change the culture of prisons. A corrections center near Spokane is encouraging offenders to work together and become accountable to each other.

Prisons around the country are using this approach in small groups. But the Airway Heights facility is taking it prisonwide in the hopes that people who are inmates never come back. KPLU's Doug Nadvornick reports.


Past Budget Decisions Key Issue in WA Gov's Race (2008-09-12)
It's become a key issue in the Washington governor's race: how the candidates balanced budgets in the past. Why does it matter? Because Washington faces a potential nearly 3-billion dollar deficit in the next two-year budget cycle. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Tough Times for WaMu (2008-09-11)
Washington Mutual stock plummeted this week after the company announced a change in leadership. The nation's largest thrift has told federal regulators it'll revise its business plan and improve risk management. KPLU's Dave Meyer looks at what's happening at WaMu with financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Boeing Expects Strike Will Last at Least 30 Days (2008-09-11)
Boeing expects the strike by its Machinists union to last at least 30 days. The company's chief financial officer spoke at a Morgan Stanley conference webcast from California. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


WA Gov Announces 4-Day Work Week Pilot (2008-09-11)
Some Washington State employees will soon enjoy a perk many workers might like - four day work weeks. Governor Chris Gregoire today (Wednesday) authorized a pilot study to see if four, ten hour days saves the state money. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Nowadays Cowboys Are Carpooling to the Pendleton Round-up (2008-09-11)
One of the biggest rodeos in the West is underway in northeast Oregon (Sept. 10-13). But the cowboys and girls competing at the Pendleton Round-Up have had to synch-up their spending a bit, because of high gas prices. Anna King reports.


WA Senate Majority Leader Faces Hostile Supreme Court (2008-09-10)
Raising taxes takes a two-thirds vote of the legislature in this state. But a key lawmaker is challenging the constitutionality of that rule. Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Lisa Brown, a Spokane Democrat, faced a skeptical state Supreme Court. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has the story.


Food for Thought: Vacuum Sealer (2008-09-10)
A few weeks ago on Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer bragged up her latest cooking gadget - the meat grinder attachment for her KitchenAid Mixer. This week, KPLU's Dick Stein attempts to go her one better in the kitchen gizmo wars.


Local Home Sales Fall in August (2008-09-10)
If you're trying to sell a home in the Puget Sound region, you're still better off than in many parts of the country. But August statistics show a dramatic decline in both the number of homes sold and the median prices in King County. And that picture is similar in neighboring counties. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Elderly Abuse is Often Financial (2008-09-10)
Theft, scams, and abuse targeting the elderly are hard to prevent. As KPLU's Keith Seinfeld reports, prosecutors hope stricter penalties might act as a deterrent.


Wine Tasting in Your Local Grocery Store? (2008-09-10)
Washington State is starting a year-long pilot program that will allow wine and beer tasting in grocery stores. The new program is aimed at helping stores compete with wineries and boutiques that already offer tastings. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Tree House in a Flood Zone (2008-09-09)
Getting permission to build a house in a flood-plain is harder than it used to be. But some King County leaders say there should be a loop-hole for tree-houses. KPLU's Keith Seinfeld reports:


Home Sales and Prices Fall Dramatically (2008-09-09)
The region's housing market continues to slide. The median price for a home in King County was down by more than eleven percent this August compared to last - and the picture was similar in Snohomish and Pierce Counties. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Financial Exploitation Targets the Elderly (2008-09-09)
As America ages, more of our wealth is concentrated in the elderly. That makes them an attractive target for thieves. But prosecutors say the criminals can be hard to convict. KPLU's Keith Seinfeld reports.


Bellevue Teachers Reject Latest Offer (2008-09-09)
Bellevue's striking teachers voted down the district's latest offer for a settlement Monday night. They rejected the offer by a 75 percent majority. The latest offer included a pay raise, but teachers said it wasn't enough. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing has the latest on the strike.


Looking Back to Look Forward: Health Care Reform (2008-09-09)
In Part Two of KPLU's special election series Looking Back To Look Forward, we hear about the history of health care reform. If you ask voters many will say the big push for a national health plan began with Bill & Hillary Clinton in the early 1990's. But it's decades older than that. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Washington Mutual: What's Next? (2008-09-08)
Can a new CEO turn Washington Mutual around? The company has lost almost 70 percent of its market value in the past year, and its future is uncertain.More, from KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


Drug Abuse Declines, But Pills A Problem (2008-09-08)
Drug abuse is down among teenagers, and for most young adults. But, for those teens who do experiment with drugs, more are turning to their parents' medicine cabinets. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld explains.


Voter's Guide: WA Insurance Commisioner's Race (2008-09-08)
Have you ever read the fine print on your insurance policies? If not you're probably not alone. That's one reason why Washington State has the Office of Insurance Commissioner: to regulate insurance companies and make sure consumers get what they pay for. But it's also becoming a bully pulpit for healthcare reform. In this installment of our voter's guide, KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports on the race for Insurance Commissioner.


Wine Chilled By Cool Temperatures (2008-09-08)
Northwest and British Columbia winemakers are a bit nervous. That's because a cool spring has been followed by a cool beginning of fall, despite the past couple of days of warm temperatures. KPLU's Anna King explains.


An Angry Union (2008-09-08)
The strike by the machinists union against the Boeing Company is in its 3rd day. The overwhelming vote by Boeing Machinists to strike underscores an anger over what union members see as a company unwilling to share the wealth. KPLU's Paula Wissel visited with picketers at the 737 plant in Renton.


Boeing Strike is On (2008-09-05)
The strike is on. Those were the words of Mark Blondin - the Machinists' union's chief negotiator, speaking from Florida. No agreement emerged despite the efforts of a federal mediator to prevent a walk-out by the Boeing Company's largest union. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Highway Sensor-ship (2008-09-05)
Any day now, the state DOT will release its latest speed report for 2008. It'll tell state officials where drivers have the heaviest lead feet. KPLU's Doug Nadvornick reports the vehicle speeds are measured by sensors that you can't see.


Whistleblowers Awarded 4.8 Million in Hanford Case (2008-09-05)
Eleven pipefitters have won their case before the State Supreme Court against a major Hanford Nuclear Reservation contractor. The men battled in courts for about 10 years. Their prize: 4.8 million dollars. The workers were laid off because they stood up to their managers and refused to install inadequate valves. KPLU's Anna King explains.


Why Bellevue Teachers Want to Change Curriculum (2008-09-05)
The teachers strike in Bellevue continues today. The union is demanding higher wages = a central issue in almost every strike. But they're also making another demand. The teachers in Bellevue want to change what's called a web-based curriculum. KPLU's Education Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt explains what it's all about:


Thiel on UW Football (2008-09-05)
One week into the college football season for the University of Washington, and there's lots of grumbling in Montlake. The Huskies dropped their season opener at Oregon last weekend, losing 44 to 10. The loss prompted some speculation that UW coach Ty Willingham's job may be in jeopardy. KPLU's Gary Davis spoke with Seattle PI sports columnist Art Thiel, who says "nonsense!"


Boeing Strike Looming (2008-09-05)
The clock is ticking. Boeing's Machinists' union is poised to go on strike just after midnight tonight, unless talks in Florida produce an 11th-hour agreement. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


WA Ballot Measures: Eyman's Targets Traffic Congestion (2008-09-04)
Washington State initiative guru Tim Eyman is back again. This year he has a measure on the November ballot that promises to reduce traffic congestion. He got the idea from a state performance audit of the Department of Transportation - an audit that was mandated by another Eyman initiative. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has the pros and cons of I-985.


Mental Health Advocates React to Skagit Shooting (2008-09-04)
Mental health advocates hope the shootings in Skagit County serve as a wake up call. They say current state laws make it difficult to lock up the mentally ill BEFORE something tragic happens. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Townhouses for a Growing Population (2008-09-04)
As the region grows, so grow townhouses. KPLU's John Maynard talks with real estate appraiser Richard Hagar about how this type of housing is helping to slow urban sprawl.


Shooting Rampage Suspect Held on $5M Bail (2008-09-04)
The suspect in Tuesday's deadly shooting spree in Skagit County is being held today on five million dollars bail. Isaac Zamora is charged with six counts of murder and two counts of attempted murder. Meanwhile police and mental health advocates try to piece together what happened. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Japanese Dolphin Hunt Protested (2008-09-04)
Demonstrators gathered in front of the Japanese Consulate in Seattle yesterday. They were calling for an end to the annual hunt of thousands of dolphins in Japan. Demonstrations were also held in London and as many as 25 other cities around the world. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Boeing Machinists Strike on Hold (2008-09-04)
Boeing's largest union, the Aerospace Machinists, voted overwhelmingly to reject the company's contract offer and go on strike. But their walkout is on hold for 48 hours at the request of the governor and a federal mediator. The ballots were counted and the results announced at the Machinists Union hall in South Seattle. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp was there.


Bellevue Teachers Continue Strike (2008-09-03)
Bellevue teachers continue to walk picket lines this morning. It's the second day of their strike. Negotiations yesterday failed to produce any major movements on the key issues of pay and curriculum. More now on those issues from KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing.


Race Heats Up To Get Latino Votes In The NW (2008-09-03)
New U.S. Census data shows Washington State has two counties that are now majority Latino. In Central Oregon, the Hispanic community has doubled over the last seven years. In Idaho, Canyon County east of Boise is now 20 percent Latino. All of this is evidence of the growing influence of Latinos in the Northwest. But will this population turn out to elect a president this November? KPLU's Anna King hit the streets with a Democratic team trying to get out the Latino vote in Yakima, Washington.


Law Review Tackles Oregon Death with Dignity Law (2008-09-03)
Oregon's Death with Dignity Law is the subject of dueling articles in the latest Michigan Law Review. The entire issue is devoted to the impact of a 10-year old US Supreme Court ruling on assisted suicide. The articles are now becoming fodder in the campaign for an Oregon-style measure in Washington State. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Food for Thought: Picky Kid Eaters (2008-09-03)
During the day they're off to school - at last. But you still have to feed the kids when they come home. On this week's Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson - and some of the KPLU news staff - discuss cooking for picky eaters.


Back To School (2008-09-02)
This week, more than a million students head back to school in Washington State. For many parents and kids, it will be a mixed experience. KPLU's Shirley Skeel went to the Seattle Center to talk to some of them about the week ahead.


More Buses in Seattle (2008-09-02)
Hopping a bus to work in downtown Seattle could get a little easier next year. The state is pouring thirty-two million dollars into improving transit in the city. The idea is to offset the traffic mess created when sections of the viaduct are torn down and replaced. More from KPLU's Paula Wissel.


Park Wolves (2008-09-02)
A study of Olympic National Park suggests the elimination of wolves 70 years ago has dramatically altered the park ecosystem. Larger elk herds triggered landscape transformation. The Oregon State University researchers take no position on whether wolves should be reintroduced into this part of the Northwest. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


More NW Travelers Choosing the Train (2008-09-02)
High gas prices and scaled-back airline schedules have sent many summer travelers looking for alternatives. For a growing number, that alternative has been a train. As KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty found out, rail travel seems to be making a comeback as a more economical, less-stressful and greener choice.


Political Rhetoric - Looking Back to Look Forward: Part One (2008-09-02)
When was the last time a presidential candidate inspired you with his words? Was it Barack Obama or John McCain? Or maybe you have to reach back further - perhaps to Ronald Reagan or John Kennedy. Political rhetoric is the art of harnessing emotions through the language with the goal of persuading an audience. In Part One of KPLU's election series, "Looking Back to Look Forward," Austin Jenkins explores with voters what works and what doesn't when it comes to political rhetoric.


NW Republicans Flock to St. Paul (2008-09-01)
Hundreds of Northwest Republicans are in St. Paul, Minnesota this week for the Republican National Convention. But two notable party luminaries are not: Oregon Senator Gordon Smith and Washington gubernatorial candidate Dino Rossi. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


OR Set to Break Ground on State Hospital Project (2008-09-01)
A new chapter in the long history of Oregon's troubled State Hospital starts this week. Officials will break ground Wednesday on a massive upgrade to the 120-year-old mental health facility. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Changing Times: A Modern Labor Day (2008-08-29)
The Labor Day holiday has been celebrated for more than a hundred years in the U.S. Once it meant labor union parades to honor the American worker. But times have changed, as KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


Rossi Debuts First General Election Ad (2008-08-29)
Last night (Thursday night) belonged to Barack Obama at the Democratic National Convention. But Washington gubernatorial candidate Dino Rossi - a Republican - had a plan up his sleeve to get noticed too. It involved wading into enemy territory. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Report: Washington Schools Struggling Academically (2008-08-29)
The number of Washington public schools labeled by the federal government as academically struggling more than doubled this year, according to a preliminary report the state superintendent's office released Thursday.


Boeing Machinists Recommend Strike (2008-08-29)
Boeing's largest union is recommending that members reject the company's final offer next week and go on strike. Job security is the biggest issue - and the union says it wants to use its leverage to gain more ground after years of concessions. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Hotel Workers Union Sets Sights on Edgewater (2008-08-29)
A national union drive to get middle class incomes for hotel workers has set its sights on Seattle's Edgewater. The union called Unite Here has secured better contracts for thousands of employees at the Seattle Westin and in several Northwest Hilton hotels. The union will picket outside the Edgewater near Seattle's Sculpture Park tomorrow (Saturday). More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Seattle Storm Aim For Playoffs (2008-08-29)
The Seattle Storm and the W-N-B-A took a mid-season break to allow players to compete in the Beijing Olympics. And it was costly for the Storm - All-Star forward Lauren Jackson is out for the season, recovering from ankle surgery. KPLU's Gary Davis spoke with Seattle Storm Coach Brian Agler about losing Jackson, and the team's hopes for the for making the playoffs.


Wind Power Surge Challenges Grid Operator (2008-08-28)
Can there be too much of a good thing when it comes to wind power? The Bonneville Power Administration is confronting that question this summer. The regional grid operator has a pile of new connection requests from wind farm developers. There wouldn't be much of a story if you could schedule the wind minute-by-minute. But correspondent Tom Banse reports a fickle energy source like this makes life in the control room more interesting.


Boeing's Best and Final Offer (2008-08-28)
More than four months of contract talks are over. Boeing has delivered its final offer to members of the Machinists union, who now have five days to study the proposal before they vote on it Wednesday. It includes an eleven percent pay raise over three years, an increase in the pension and new incentive pay. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


WA Gov's Race: Gregoire and Rossi Within 2% Points (2008-08-28)
Almost all the votes have been tallied in Washington State's primary election. And the governor's race is closer than ever. Now less than two percentage points separate incumbent Democrat Chris Gregoire and Republican challenger Dino Rossi. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Possible Strike for Bellevue (2008-08-28)
The Bellevue School District often makes "the Best of Lists" in the world of education. But as KPLU reporter Jennifer Wing tells us, a serious budget deficit and a potential teachers' strike are putting a strain on the district.


Duncan Reax (2008-08-28)
Confessed child killer Joseph Duncan will be put to death. A jury in Boise deliberated for three hours on yesterday (Wednesday) afternoon before returning its verdict. KPLU's Doug Nadvornick reports on reaction to the verdict from Coeur d'Alene, where Duncan's crime hit home.


Upgrading to Vista (2008-08-28)
Computers may be driving the information age, but they also drive people crazy! Mark Anderson publishes the computing industry newsletter Strategic News Service, and even he had a hard time upgrading to Windows Vista. He spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


WASL: Success and Failure (2008-08-27)
The numbers are in. This is the time of year when students find out how they did on the Washington Assessment of Student Learning Exam. Some of the trends are good and others have educators scratching their heads. KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing has more.


The Squeeze - Part 3: Spokane Woman Loses Home But Keeps Community (2008-08-27)
Much of the Northwest has been spared the wave of home foreclosures moving across the country. In fact, in places like Seattle and Spokane, many houses had held their values, or even appreciated a bit over the last year. But there are exceptions. In the last of our 3-part series called "The Squeeze," we profile a Spokane woman who lost her house, but kept her community, through the sub-prime mortgage mess. Amanda Loder has her story.


Firefighting Costs Pinch Forest Service Budget (2008-08-27)
For the third year in a row, the increasing cost of fighting wildfires is burning a hole in the budget of the US Forest Service. That could mean less money for trails, habitat restoration and community fire prevention. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains.


WASL 2008: Results and Changes (2008-08-27)
The results for the Washington Assessment of Student Learning Exam this year include both success and failure. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing fills us in on the details.


Food for Thought: Grind Your Own (2008-08-27)
On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson proves that when it comes to do-it-yourself hamburger she's not cowed.


Machinists to Boeing: Still Not Good Enough (2008-08-26)
Negotiations on a new contract for 25,000 Aerospace Machinists at Boeing are continuing around the clock this week. The company has submitted a second full proposal to the union, which called the first one insulting. But the union says it's still not good enough. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Boeing Increases Offer to Machinists (2008-08-26)
Boeing has submitted a second contract offer to the Machinists union. Over the weekend, union negotiators called the company's first offer insulting. The latest offer removes two of the three points the union had identified as strike issues. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Load Up The Family & Road Trip to Hanford's B Reactor (2008-08-26)
It's not your usual National Historic Landmark. But today (Monday) the B Reactor at Hanford Nuclear Reservation received that designation. That means the boxy-like structure near the Columbia River won't be ripped down and cocooned. Instead, tourists will be able to visit one of the most secretive projects in the nation's history. KPLU's Anna King visited the historic reactor and has this story.


The Squeeze - Part Two: Former Soldier Struggles in Down Economy (2008-08-26)
For soldiers - the transition from war back to civilian life is often difficult. Now to complicate matters, veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts are coming home to a shaky economy. In the Southwest corner of Washington State, one former soldier is struggling to support herself and her new baby while she goes to school. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports in part two of our series The Squeeze: How a declining economy impacts people who are low income.


How Much is Too Much Pot? WA Debates Marijuana Rules (2008-08-26)
Medicinal marijuana users in wheelchairs and with canes packed a hearing room in Olympia today (Monday). They're angry about a proposal to limit the number of pot plants they can grow at home. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Renewable Energy Leaders Find McCain Plan Lacking (2008-08-26)
Presidential candidates John McCain and Barack Obama have both put forward plans to combat global warming and break the nation's dependence on oil. The heads of some of the Northwest's leading renewable energy companies say they've compared those plans, and find Obama's more to their liking. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Coping With Gun Violence in Seattle (2008-08-26)
This year's rash of shootings in Seattle is prompting a new look at the emotional consequences. Children and teenagers who went to school with the victims may be wrestling with grief and anger. The Seattle Urban League wants to focus on healing some of that pain - before it leads to more violence. KPLU's Keith Seinfeld reports.


Whales Reveal Climate Information (2008-08-25)
The gray whales that migrate along the west coast may be "canaries in the coal mine" that can help scientists track climate change in the Pacific Northwest. That's according to a new government study. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains.


Gadget Charger (2008-08-25)
A northwest company is giving an early peek at a handy new product today. It's an external battery charger... powered by motion. The technology allows you to charge your cell phone, MP3 player, or other mobile device through everyday activities, such as walking. More now from KPLU's Tom Banse.


Energy Entrepreneurs Back Obama (2008-08-25)
Some of the Northwest's leading energy entrepreneurs gathered Monday to announce their support for Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama's plan for a sustainable energy future. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty was there.


Political Party Forms to Put Ralph Nader on Ballot (2008-08-25)
It now appears activist Ralph Nader will make the Presidential ballot in all the Northwest states. Leaders of a newly formed party in Oregon say their going to see to that. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Blue Collar Jobs (2008-08-25)
Times are tough for job hunters. But maybe that's because too many people are looking for the same jobs. According to a new internet campaign, there are dream jobs aplenty just waiting for young people. KPLU's Shirley Skeel has the story.


What Will NW Democrats Do In Denver? (2008-08-25)
More than 200 Northwest Democrats are in Denver for this week's (August 25-28) Democratic National Convention. They are delegates, super delegates and party luminaries. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this preview of the speeches, the social events and the goings on.


"The Squeeze: Part One" - NW Economic Indicators (2008-08-25)
The national economic slowdown is leaving its mark on our region in a spotty pattern. Building permits are off in some areas...and some luxury item sales are down. In the first part of our series called "The Squeeze," KPLU's Tom Banse finds economic indicators like bankruptcies and food bank demand, may be a better way to judge just who is most vulnerable in the northwest.


Art Thiel's Farewell to Beijing Olympics (2008-08-22)
The Beijing Olympics close Sunday. They've been memorable for stellar performances, including U.S. swimmer Michael Phelps, and the blazing speed of Jamaica's Usain Bolt. KPLU's Gary Davis spoke with Seattle PI sports columnist Art Thiel as the games wind down. Thiel says these Olympics will also be remembered as the International Olympic Committee's attempt to move China toward more political openness.


Interesting Outcomes Emerge in WA Primary (2008-08-22)
Votes continue to be counted following Washington State's primary on Tuesday. And political-watchers are noticing some interesting outcomes. Especially in races other than the high-profile governor's election. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Boeing/Machinists' Talks Underway (2008-08-22)
Round-the-clock talks between the Machinists' Union and the Boeing Company are underway in Seatac. The men and women who assemble jetliners are pushing for big improvements in this contract - which they say Boeing can afford. The company says it's trying hard to comply. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Pot Farm Busts on Record Pace (2008-08-22)
It's only August. Yet federal and local drug agents have already surpassed last year's total seizures of marijuana plants from outdoor pot farms in the Northwest. On Wednesday, another 24-thousand plants were uprooted from an illegal grow on a remote corner of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Washington and Oregon rank in the top five states for eradicating illegally grown marijuana. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


UW Students Protest Nike Contract (2008-08-21)
Earlier this month, the University of Washington athletic department agreed to a lucrative new ten-year partnership with Nike for the supply of uniforms and equipment. A group of students is protesting the deal. They're worried it lacks provisions to ensure protection of the workers who sew and manufacture the gear. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Olympia Mural (2008-08-21)
Residents of Olympia are being invited to express their support of Palestinians through an art project this weekend. The local reaction so far is mixed. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


The Walla Walla Valley is Changing from Wheat to Wine (2008-08-21)
Wheat farmers have been harvesting grain in the Walla Walla Valley for more than a century. But lately vineyards and ritzy housing developments are taking over those productive, golden fields. Some say the Walla Walla Valley is in danger of losing what attracts tourists and new residents -- its rural charm. KPLU's Anna King visited a few of those plush vineyards and dusty wheat farms and brings us this story.


Alaska Airline to Retire Last MD-80 Jets Next Week (2008-08-21)
If you've flown on Alaska Airlines in recent years, chances are you've ridden on an MD-80 jet. Late next week, the Seattle-based airline is retiring the last of that aging model from its fleet. KPLU's Tom Banse has the reason why.


Tight Quarters (2008-08-21)
One of the rites of passage for college students is moving off campus and truly getting a place of their own. But high rents and record numbers of students are driving people back into dorm rooms. With more on this trend, KPLU's Jennifer Wing reports.


Foreign Stocks (2008-08-21)
Do you have foreign stocks in your portfolio? Many advisers recommend them, and they've performed well in recent years. But financial commentator Greg Heberlein remains skeptical. He spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Thirtymile Boss to Serve Time (2008-08-21)
A federal judge in Spokane has sentenced a former Forest Service fire commander to three months time. Ellreese Daniels had pleaded guilty to lying to a team investigating the Thirtymile forest fire in central Washington in 2001. Four firefighters died in that fire when they were overrun by flames. KPLU's Doug Nadvornick reports.


Gov's Race (2008-08-21)
A day after the first Primary results were counted, it looks like the state is in for another close Governor's race in November. With votes still being tallied, Governor Chris Gregoire has a four percent lead over Republican challenger Dino Rossi. Their race is a rematch from 2004. KPLU's Austin Jenkins takes a look.


Trees Poisoned Along Burke-Gilman Trail (2008-08-21)
Five large trees along the Burke-Gilman trail in Seattle have been killed and two more damaged. Someone drilled dozens of holes in the trunks, then apparently filled them with poison. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story.


Primary Analysis (2008-08-20)
Washington State's political landscape changed overnight. For the first time, candidates from the same political party will face off in the general election. That's because of the state's new top-two primary - where the top vote getters advance to the November ballot regardless of party affiliation. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this analysis.


Primary Race Perspectives (2008-08-20)
The campaigns of both candidates for governor are spinning the close results of yesterday's primary. What does it really mean? One veteran political observer says, probably not much. KPLU's Liam Moriarty explains.


Food for Thought: Favorite Food Writing (2008-08-20)
This week's Food for Thought takes a literary turn as Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein share excerpts from some of their favorite food writing.


First West Nile Case in WA for 2008 (2008-08-20)
One week after Oregon reported its first human cases of West Nile virus in 2008, Washington State has its first case. The infection of a King County woman was uncovered in an unusual way. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Medical Clinics Where You Shop (2008-08-19)
You've gotten used to banks opening inside supermarkets. A newer trend is the medical clinic inside retail stores. You'll find them at a handful of QFC supermarkets. Now, Tacoma's biggest health provider is experimenting with clinics inside drugstores. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld has the story:


Putting Bad Air News in Perspective (2008-08-19)
Over the weekend, the Seattle area violated federal air pollution standards for smog for the first time in 16 years. Now, the EPA says the Tacoma area has violated standards for soot. What's going on with the air all of a sudden? KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains there's no need to get out the gas masks.


Democratic Lawyer: Lawsuit Over Top Two Primary Possible (2008-08-19)
The format of Washington State's new top-two primary system may trigger another round of lawsuits. That's according to a top Democratic Party attorney. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Small Town Flights (2008-08-19)
Higher fuel costs mean it's getting harder to find a seat on a flight out of town in many Northwest communities. Another round of airline cuts is set to take effect this fall in places such as Spokane, Boise and Klamath Falls. KPLU's Chris Lehman took a ride on one of the flights that's being grounded to see how travelers are reacting to the changes...


Divers Remove Tires From Marine Park (2008-08-19)
Divers are removing more than 500 old tires from 60 feet of water at Saltwater State Park in Des Moines, south of Seattle. How did all those tires get into Puget Sound? KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains.


Fixing the Forest After a Wildfire (2008-08-19)
The largest wildfire in the Northwest has been fully contained. But fire crews aren't done with their work. Now they're rehabbing the 22-thousand acres that have burned on the Colville Indian Reservation in northeastern Washington. Doug Nadvornick reports.


Rossi Tamps Down Expectations on Eve of Primary (2008-08-18)
Tomorrow's (Tuesday's) Washington State primary won't decide the Governor's race. Even so the stakes are high for the top Republican and Democratic candidates. Whoever wins the most votes will gain some important bragging rights. While the loser may have some explaining to do. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Kids Boot Camp (2008-08-18)
For kids, having a parent go to Iraq is a bit like having them go to the moon. The parent is gone for months, to a place the children know little about. So Fort Lewis is giving kids a taste of what their parents do. And what better way than Army boot camp. Shirley Skeel reports.


Old Growth Threatened by Road Project (2008-08-18)
How important is it to keep a remote camping area accessible to RVs and other motor vehicles? That's the question being argued in the Olympic National Forest. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Principal Makes 600 Homes Visits (2008-08-18)
No child at Saghalie Middle School can say that they didn't know about the new dress code or when school started this year. That's because they have all received a personal visit from their principal this month. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes us to Federal Way to meet Principal Damon Hunter. He's entering his 5th year at the school but this summer he's trying something new:


Last Minute Tips for Voters (2008-08-18)
Tuesday, Washington voters will be taking part in the state's first Top-Two -style primary. King County election officials have some tips to help the polling go smoothly. KPLU's Liam Moriarty has more.


Hanford's F Reactor Gets a Cocoon Check-up (2008-08-18)
The Hanford site in southeast Washington is home to nine closed reactors that once made plutonium for atomic bombs. The ghostly buildings along the Columbia River are isolated and get few visitors. One of the oldest of the reactors just got a checkup to make sure nothing's gotten in or out. Anna King reports whether anything was found amiss.


Thiel on China's 'Perfect' Olympics (2008-08-15)
Just a week into the Summer Olympics, the Beijing games will certainly be remembered for the number of world records that have been set in swimming and many other sports. But, naturally, the hosts also want to impress the world with how the games are being run. KPLU's Gary Davis spoke with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel, who's in Beijing. He says it's time for China to drop the quest for a perfect' Olympics.


Assisted Suicide Issue Heats up in WA (2008-08-15)
The Catholic Church has begun pouring money into the campaign to defeat Washington's Death with Dignity ballot initiative. This is the Oregon-style measure that would allow doctors to prescribe lethal doses of drugs to terminally ill patients. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Mormons Stockpile for Hard Times (2008-08-15)
In economic hard times many of us think about the need to save some money or store up food for backup. Latter Day Saints - or Mormons - already have an elaborate system in place for stockpiling food. It's existed for decades but Mormon food storage centers are now enjoying a surge in popularity. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt:


Prison Vests (2008-08-15)
The union for federal prison officers is in Seattle campaigning for better protection for their members. This follows the violent death of a correctional officer in June. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


New Calf for Local Orca Pods (2008-08-14)
The Puget Sound region's killer whale families have another new member. But several losses this season suggest the local orca population isn't rebounding. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has an update.


Microsoft Stock Buyback (2008-08-14)
Now that it looks like Microsoft won't be buying Yahoo, what will it do with all of its cash? Many analysts expect the company will buy back a lot of its own stock. KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Defending bin Laden's Driver (2008-08-14)
For Seattle Attorney Harry Schneider it was a long journey from his corporate law office at Perkins Coie to a makeshift courtroom in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. And we're not just talking mileage. Schneider helped defend a man who worked as a driver for Osama bin Laden. The case concluded last week when a jury of military officers found the driver not guilty of conspiracy charges. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel talks with the attorney.


Uranium Worker Compensation (2008-08-14)
Sick former Hanford workers are eligible for compensation. So are the former employees of a now defunct uranium mine on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Doug Nadvornick reports federal caseworkers were taking claims in Spokane on Wednesday.


December Flood & Windstorm Lessons Parsed (2008-08-14)
Some southwest Washington communities and homeowners are still rebuilding after a ferocious windstorm and flooding pummeled western Washington and northwest Oregon eight months ago. Now that it's hot and sunny, officials are taking a timeout to look at what worked and didn't work during the disaster. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from Olympia.


U of Idaho & WSU Merge Programs (2008-08-14)
There's an interesting consolidation taking place with two northwest universities. The Food Science Departments at the University of Idaho and Washington State University are merging to create one, new, academic unit. Glenn Mosley reports.


Launching a Ship of Exploration (2008-08-13)
A high-tech ship with a mission to explore the mysteries of the deep was commissioned in Seattle Wednesday. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty was on the waterfront to see the Okeanos Explorer, the government's first ship dedicated exclusively to ocean exploration.


Food for Thought: Urban Foraging (2008-08-13)
There's food free for the taking growing right in the city. On this week's Food for Thought, Seattle Time food writer Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein all about sidewalk shopping.


Money Flows As Gregoire Negotiates Worker Contracts (2008-08-13)
Washington Governor Chris Gregoire is in the midst of negotiating new contracts with state employee labor unions. At the same time she's benefiting from hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from those very same organizations. Her Republican challenger calls it a conflict of interest. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Young Hunters in the Crosshairs (2008-08-13)
Prosecutors in northwest Washington will charge a 14-year-old boy with manslaughter. The boy fatally shot a female hiker while he was bear hunting with a teenage companion on August 2. The Skagit County prosecutor says the shooting was an accident, but the young man acted recklessly. Doug Nadvornick reports the case could lead to changes in Washington law.


Idaho Lab Works on Cheaper Version of Solar Power (2008-08-13)
Engineers with the Idaho National Lab are working on a cheaper and more efficient way of capturing solar energy. If it's perfected, power hungry gadgets could someday get a quick recharge through a flexible skin of solar cells. The new process will be presented at a conference tomorrow (Wednesday) in Jacksonville, Florida. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Government Reviews Hanford Treatment Plant (2008-08-13)
Federal lawmakers demanded a status report on how construction is going at Hanford's massive waste treatment plant. They want to make sure the project is safe and that it's not wasting taxpayer dollars. More from KPLU's Anna King.


Free Bus (2008-08-12)
Climb aboard a CityLink bus in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho and you notice something missing: a fare box. You can get on and ride all day without dropping a dime. Free public transit is rare these days. But people tired of paying four bucks a gallon for gas are taking advantage of it. KPLU's Doug Nadvornick reports.


A Fight to Save School's Trees (2008-08-12)
Neighbors of Ingraham High School in North Seattle are on a mission to save a grove of trees. As KPLU's Jennifer Wing tells us, the trees are scheduled to be cut down to make way for a new addition to the school.


Obama and McCain Campaigns Plot Strategy for Winning NW (2008-08-12)
A blend of hi-tech AND old-fashioned grassroots organizing. That's how the Barack Obama and John McCain presidential campaigns intend to win in the Northwest this November. The Obama campaign yesterday (Monday) outlined its strategy for carrying Washington State. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Northwest Fire Roundup (2008-08-12)
Crews in the three Northwest states are racing the weather this week as they battle ten wildfires. Doug Nadvornick has this roundup.


Falconry Takes Flight as a Business (2008-08-12)
Falconry used to be just a sport, chiefly for people with a lot of money or a lot of time. But a handful of master falconers around the Northwest are finding their birds of prey can be quite useful to make a living. KPLU's Tom Banse explains why the federal government recently changed the rules of the game to encourage falcons-for-hire.


Kennewick Company Working on New Way to Capture Sun's Energy (2008-08-12)
Think solar energy, and you probably visualize those huge shiny panels. A company in sunny Eastern Washington has come up with a new way to make energy from the sun. The engineers' device looks like a giant satellite dish, plastered with mirrors. Richland Correspondent Anna King profiles Infinia Corporation. It's just one of a number of Northwest companies trying to capitalize on the popularity of renewable energy.


Alaska Airlines Resumes Flights (2008-08-11)
Alaska Airlines has resumed operations after the cancellation of dozens of flights to and from Alaska because of volcanic ash. But the airline says the disruptions might not be over yet. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp reports.


The Meaning of Work Summer Encore: The Projectionist (2008-08-11)
Seen any good blockbusters this summer? This morning we honor the unsung heroes of your local multiplex, the men and women who run the projectors. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp introduces us to one of the areas most seasoned operators. It's part of the encore presentation from KPLU's Meaning of Work series.


Chili Peppers - Heated By Bugs (2008-08-11)
If you enjoy a little spice in your food, you can thank not just the growers of chili peppers - but also a fungus that attacks those chilies. The spicy taste is how the plant defends its seeds, according to a Seattle researcher. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld has the story:


"Seattle": A Conversation with Joel Rogers (2008-08-11)
Photographer and writer Joel Rogers is a Seattle native who has a sometimes-complicated relationship with his hometown. KPLU's Liam Moriarty recently spoke with Rogers about his latest book, titled simply, "Seattle." It's an exploration of the unique character of the city and the people who live here.


Olympic Track & Field Memories (2008-08-11)
The Olympic track and field events begin on Friday. One group of interested observers will be the athletes who participated in last weekend's USA Masters Track and Field Championship in Spokane. They include two past Olympians with Northwest ties. They shared Olympic memories with KPLU's Doug Nadvornick.


Bridge Suicides (2008-08-11)
The Washington Department of Transportation is working on plans to build a barrier on the Aurora Bridge to prevent a growing number of suicides. Its chief aim now is to find an acceptable design. KPLU's Shirley Skeel has more.


Summer Not Slowing WA Governor's Race (2008-08-11)
It's the dog days of summer. But that's not slowing the leading candidates for Washington State Governor. The campaigns are heating up - with TV ads, almost daily partisan attacks and continued fundraising. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Umatilla Chemical Depot Reaches Another Milestone (2008-08-08)
Every couple of months The Umatilla Chemical Depot in north-east Oregon announces another milestone. Its mission is to destroy dangerous chemicals produced during World War II and the Cold War. This week depot workers have finished dismantling small cannon shells filled with nerve agent. Anna King talked with the depot's operation manager about what it's like to be in charge of one of America's most dangerous factories.


Thiel on Beijing Olympics, China's High Stakes (2008-08-08)
The Beijing Olympics opened today. China's put out the welcome mat to the world, and is wanting to make a good impression. KPLU's Gary Davis spoke with Seattle PI sports columnist Art Thiel, who's in Beijing. Thiel says as the games begin the good impression is as much for the Chinese as it is for the international community.


Humming Bird Bander Goes to Work in a WA Backyard (2008-08-08)
Hold a penny in your hand. That's about how much a hummingbird weighs. Every summer, hundreds of the tiny birds gather in a backyard just outside of Walla Walla. It's a great spot for Ned Batchelder. He's been trapping and banding the hummers for about eight years. The bands help scientists track hummingbirds' migratory patterns. So far Batchelder has banded about 20-thousand of the tiny creatures with his wife Gigi. We caught up with him recently. Here's Ned's story in his own words.


OSU Researcher Testing Air Quality During Beijing Olympics (2008-08-08)
Beijing, China is not only the host city for the Olympic Games. It's also the scene of a massive science experiment to see if a smog-choked metropolis can clear its skies. An Oregon State University researcher is on the ground in Beijing helping to assess the air pollution controls. KPLU's Tom Banse called her and has this report.


B.C. Driver's License (2008-08-08)
The Beijing Olympics are just beginning - but it's the Winter Olympics that are the focus in British Columbia. Officials there are doing all they can to ensure success in 2010, including making it easier to travel across the U.S. border. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


Wilburton Tunnel Removal Means Weekend Delays (2008-08-08)
For the next three weekends, southbound I-405 in Bellevue will be closed for construction. State transportation officials say that could mean big delays. But as KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports, there are ways drivers can make it easier on themselves.


Seattle Bilingual Education Needs Overhaul (2008-08-08)
Seattle Public School leaders are sifting through a new 84-page audit that slammed the district's bilingual program. The report called for a complete program overhaul. KPLU Education Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt takes a lot at what's next.


Internet Rental Scams (2008-08-07)
Internet scams are now affecting landlords and renters. KPLU's John Maynard talks with Richard Hagar, and educator and appraiser, about what to do if it happens to you.


Public Health Funding Feels the Crunch (2008-08-07)
Raising fees and begging the state legislature for help. Those are the top two agenda items for the King County Board of Health, as it meets Thursday, August 7th. Similar budget problems face many county services and public health departments around the state. More from KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld.


NW States Don't Have Laws Requiring DNA Preservation (2008-08-07)
Washington, Oregon and Idaho are among 25 states that don't require DNA evidence to be saved indefinitely. That's according to The Innocence Project, a group that works to exonerate the wrongly convicted. The group wants the states to adopt model legislation. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Portrait Artist On a Mission to Paint the Fallen (2008-08-07)
If a picture is worth a thousand words, what then is the value of a hand-drawn portrait? It's powerful comfort for the families of fallen US troops killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. That at least is what they tell the incredibly productive artist who draws the portraits for free. KPLU's Tom Banse has this profile of a gifted Vietnam Vet with new mission.


Washington Wages Rise (2008-08-07)
State economists say paychecks grew at a faster rate than inflation in 2007. KPLU's Doug Nadvornick reports.


Yucca Mountain Price Tag Keeps Going Up (2008-08-06)
The feds say it's going to cost nearly 40 percent more to bore a huge tunnel into Yucca Mountain in Nevada. Why should you care? That's where Washington State plans to ship its most dangerous radioactive waste. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Boeing Machinists Demonstrate (2008-08-06)
Hundreds of Machinists at Boeing marched with signs and chanted strike at lunchtime today (Wednesday) in Everett. They're unhappy with the way contract negotiations are going for roughly 25-thousand aerospace workers. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Boeing Negotiations Spawning Protests (2008-08-06)
Earlier this year, the Boeing Company said it wanted to turn over a new leaf in its negotiations with the Machinists' union.
The two sides sat down for contract talks early - in May - and Boeing pledged to share more information about its offer sooner.
But now it seems that approach may be backfiring.
More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Gas Prices Fall, But Not at Same Rate (2008-08-06)
Northwest gas prices are falling from their record highs in July. Oregon and Washington drivers are getting a better deal than those in Idaho. Doug Nadvornick reports from Coeur d'Alene.


Sockeye Complete Epic Journey to Central Idaho (2008-08-06)
The most endangered salmon run in the Northwest is showing rare and unexpected strength this summer. Sockeye salmon by the hundreds are completing an epic journey from the ocean high into the Idaho mountains. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Belltown's Night Out (2008-08-06)
There were lots of people out on the streets last night. And it wasn't just the warm summer air. They came to share casseroles, gossip with neighbors and talk about watching out for each other. National Night Out Against Crime happens every year. The idea is to promote community safety through block parties. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel took a stroll from our downtown Seattle offices to one of those parties in an area some say isn't as safe as it should be.


Food for Thought: Sending Food Back at Restaurants (2008-08-06)
On this week's Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein take on the personas of Goofus and Gallant from the kid's magazine Highlights for Children to illustrate the best way to send food back at restaurants.


How many people get HIV? (2008-08-05)
Most people who get infected with HIV don't get tested right away -- so it's been hard for health officials to know how many people are newly infected. Now, based on a federal research project, they think they can estimate the infection rate in Washington state. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld explains:


Weird Party Labels Tickle WA Voters (2008-08-05)
Washington State voters have started to receive their ballots for this month's primary election. One noticeable change on the ballot this year is the odd wording of party affiliations. KPLU's Tom Banse explains what's going on.


Tolling 520: Looking at the Options (2008-08-05)
Replacing the aging Evergreen Point Floating Bridge over Lake Washington is projected to cost about $4 billion. State lawmakers expect tolls to pay up to half of that. What's it going to take to get there? KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty takes a look.


Berry Growers Try Alternatives to Bird Scare Cannons (2008-08-05)
It's an issue all over the Northwest. Housing development is moving into farm country. That can make for uneasy neighbors, especially at certain times of year. This is one of them. Blueberry growers commonly use booming cannons to scare birds away from the ripening crop. Up near the Canadian border, some berry farmers are experimenting with alternatives to keep the peace with neighbors but still protect crops from hungry starlings. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Human Trafficking (2008-08-04)
They could be working at your local hair salon or at the restaurant down the street, victims of human trafficking. Victim advocates say too often we overlook the crime in our midst. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has more.


Supporting Surviving Army Spouses (2008-08-04)
The Fort Lewis army base is stepping up efforts reach out to the families of deceased service members. And not just from the current wars but also older widows and widowers. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt dropped in at the 2nd annual gathering of surviving spouses


Songs for the Gas Guzzling Blues (2008-08-04)
If the high price of gas has you rethinking that summer road trip - all is not lost! How about taking a virtual road trip? KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with music host Nick Morrison about the latest list he's compiled for NPR: songs about some of the great old cars of the past.


520 Toll Options Up For Discussion (2008-08-04)
The aging 520 Bridge over Lake Washington will be replaced. Drivers will be charged tolls to help pay for it. But when tolling will begin, how much the tolls will cost, and where tolling will be in effect are all still up for discussion. This week, state officials continue a series of public meetings to get feedback. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains.


Native Plant Greenhouse (2008-08-04)
A greenhouse that will help scientists learn more about the Northwest's native desert plants opens today (Monday) in Richland. The facility was paid for by a federal contractor to compensate for violations made at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. KPLU's Anna King reports.


The Meaning of Work Encore: The Boilermaker (2008-08-02)
This summer, we've been re-airing stories from our recently completed series, The Meaning of Work. Today, we meet a man who says without industrial workers things like turning on a light switch wouldn't be possible. KPLU's Paula Wissel has his story.


Washington Primary Ballots in the Mail (2008-08-01)
Elections officials in Washington are mailing more than three million ballots this week for the state's August 19th primary. It's Washington's first "Top Two" primary. The top two finishers in each race will advance to the November general election, regardless of their party. KPLU's Doug Nadvornick reports.


Metro Transit Deficit Balloons (2008-08-01)
The same economic forces that have driven record numbers of Seattle-area commuters to take the bus to work are also taking a toll on Metro Transit's budget. Fare increases and maybe even service cutbacks could be on the way. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Community Colleges Expand Online (2008-08-01)
Washington state's community colleges are booming online. More and more students are signing up for E-learning courses. Community college leaders are trying to expand offerings and to keep up. KPLU's Education Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt has the story


Replica Guns Alarm Police (2008-08-01)
Now a story about a toy. A toy that brings joy to the hearts of many teenage boys and anxiety to law enforcement. Airsoft guns - those are B-B guns that shoot plastic pellets. They are designed to look as real as possible. So real that police, teachers, parents and just about everyone - can't always tell the difference between the toy and the real thing. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has the story:


Thiel: Beijing Olympics Preview (2008-08-01)
This time next week, you'll be hearing Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel reporting from the Olympic Games in Beijing. As he prepares to leave for China, Art talked with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick about how this Olympics experience will be unlike any other.


Blue Angels (2008-08-01)
Thousands of people will crowd the shores of Lake Washington this weekend for the annual Sea Fair. One highlight will be the U.S. Navy's Blue Angels. KPLU's Shirley Skeel has more.


EPA Warns People to Protect Themselves From the Sun (2008-07-31)
The Environmental Protection Agency is going after Northwest sun worshipers. That's because Washington State has one of the highest skin cancer rates in the nation. The agency is launching a new program to educate kids and adults about the dangers of too much sun. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Flu vaccine may not save lives (2008-07-31)
Preventing thousands of deaths each year caused by pneumonia was supposed to be as simple as giving flu shots to all seniors. But a new study conducted at Group Health Cooperative questions how well flu shots save lives. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld explains:


Families Host Minor League Baseball Players (2008-07-31)
The Mariners still have the worst record in the American League. But they're not the only game around. You can watch some winning teams in places like Spokane, Boise and Salem. That's where minor league teams play night after night. Playing in the minor leagues is a little different than playing in the big leagues. For instance, after the game the players might have to catch a ride home with some of the fans. KPLU's Chris Lehman explains.


Microsoft Post-Gates (2008-07-31)
It's been more than a month since Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates retired from his position as Chief Software Architect. Gates shared leadership of the company with CEO Steve Ballmer. Now, Ballmer is leading the company with two other top executives. KPLU's Dave Meyer looks at Microsoft's changing of the guard with technology commentator Mark Anderson.


Nestle Waters Seeking Northwest Site (2008-07-30)
Bottled water is big business - and it's controversial. Enumclaw said no to a proposed bottling plant in June. Now Nestle Waters is in talks with nearby Orting. A public hearing on the possibility of locating a plant there takes place tonight (Wednesday.) KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp has the story.


Idaho Water Accounting (2008-07-30)
A lot of Northwest communities are having trouble with their water supplies. Many fear demand will soon exceed the amount of water available. It's a big concern in the Spokane-Coeur d'Alene area. Next month (August) in Idaho, a judge will be asked to kick off a big water accounting project. State officials believe it will help the region avoid headaches down the road. KPLU's Doug Nadvornick reports.


Food for Thought: Melons (2008-07-30)
Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson waxes poetic to KPLU's Dick Stein...as she discusses the difficulty of finding ripe specimens of one of her favorite varieties of fruit - on today's Food for Thought.


West Coast Governors Announce Ocean Action Plan (2008-07-30)
The Pacific Ocean is under threat from climate change and pollution. That was the message yesterday (Tuesday) from three west coast governors, who announced a plan to address coastal issues. Chris Lehman reports.


Summer Shelter for Homeless (2008-07-30)
Cities usually open temporary homeless shelters in the middle of the winter to prevent people from freezing to death. But homeless advocates in Seattle say the shelters are necessary in the summer as well. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports.


More Job Cuts for Starbucks (2008-07-29)
Starbucks' struggles continue. The Seattle-based coffee chain has announced it's now cutting nearly one thousand office jobs. The company is attempting to boost profits by cutting costs. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Portraits of American Consumerism: A Conversation with Chris Jordan (2008-07-29)
The photo is huge - five feet tall, ten feet across. The image is a soft, pleasing pattern in blacks and grays. But get up close and you suddenly recognize it's a jumbled pile of 426,000 cell phones. That's the number of cell phones Americans get rid of each day. Photographer Chris Jordan manipulates images of mundane objects, made abstract by their sheer volume, to illustrate the impacts of American consumerism. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty visited Jordan in his Seattle studio


Starbucks Announces More Cuts, Reorganization (2008-07-29)
Another round of layoffs at Starbucks. Just a month after the news that it's closing 600 stores in the United States, the coffee giant has announced it's also cutting nearly 1,000 office jobs. A hundred eighty of those are in Seattle. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Safeco Investors Approve Merger Plan (2008-07-29)
A bittersweet day. That's how Safeco Corporation leaders described yesterday's annual shareholders' meeting in Seattle, likely the last in its history. Investors approved Safeco's merger agreement with Liberty Mutual. KPLU's Gary Davis was there, and has our report.


New health director, less confrontational (2008-07-29)
It's nearly a year since the lightning-rod Public Health Director from Pierce County quit, amid secret allegations of trying to illegally import medications from India. Now the local health board has found a replacement. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld has the story:


Fort Lewis Officer Pleads Guilty to Firearms Parts Smuggling (2008-07-29)
A guilty plea to gun parts smuggling may end the career of a US Army officer stationed at Fort Lewis. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Student Who Found Kennewick Man All Grown Up (2008-07-28)
Every summer, about this time, Will Thomas gets the same question from his friends. What was it like to find Kennewick Man? That's the 9-thousand-year-old skeleton that was found on the banks of the Columbia River 12 years ago today (Monday). KPLU's Anna King recently caught up with Thomas and has this report.


Testing newborns for diseases (2008-07-28)
Babies born in Washington this month are getting tested for twice as many diseases as in the past. Other states have mandated the new tests for several years. But as KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld explains, Washington intentionally takes a go-slow approach:


Renaissance Fair (2008-07-28)
For eleven years visitors have enjoyed the music, jousting and costumes of Washington's Renaissance Fair. But this summer - you can keep your sword in the closet. KPLU's Shirley Skeel has more.


United Way tops nation in fundraising (2008-07-28)
Fundraising at the United Way of King County has reached the stratosphere for the second year running. Although there's a slight dip from last year's record, the local United Way is still Number One in North America. KPLU's Keith Seinfeld reports:


Army apologizes for Fort Lawton travesty (2008-07-28)
It was a final chapter in an American travesty: the wrongful convictions of 28 black Army soldiers at Fort Lawton in Seattle during World War Two. Now, more than 60 years later, it was time for an apology. KPLU's Florangela Davila reports on a tribute to these soldiers -- and their families.


Fort Lewis Brigades Teach More Soldiers Arabic (2008-07-28)
The next Army Stryker brigade to deploy from Fort Lewis will have more ordinary soldiers who can speak and read Arabic. Until now, brigades sent to the war zone from the Northwest have largely relied on Iraqi-born translators. Their dependability has varied. KPLU's Tom Banse observed infantrymen trying out their new language, training in a simulated Iraqi village at Fort Lewis.


Seattle Approves Bag Fees & Styrofoam Ban (2008-07-28)
In Seattle, your choice of paper or plastic will soon cost you. The City Council has approved a 20-cent charge on disposable bags at grocery, convenience and drug store check-out counters. The council also banned the use of Styrofoam food-service containers. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Judge OKs Emergency Grazing Program (2008-07-25)
A federal judge in Seattle is allowing an emergency grazing program to go forward. A limited number of Western ranchers will get permission to graze or harvest hay from private land held in conservation reserves. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Thiel on Seahawks Training Camp (2008-07-25)
The second half of the Major League Baseball season may have just begun, but some sports fans are already thinking about football! Seahawks training camp is now underway. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick a lot is riding on this season for the Hawks.


Pool of Radioactive Sludge Being Cleaned at Hanford (2008-07-25)
Workers have emptied a pool at Hanford of its dangerous nuclear waste. Now this week they started to dismantle the structures surrounding the pool. KPLU's Richland Correspondent Anna King visited the site to check up on the demolition project.


How Much Is Puget Sound Worth? (2008-07-25)
Does Nature have a dollar value? A new study calculates that the Puget Sound's natural ecosystems perform services that are worth billions every year. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains


Rapid Transit on Fall Ballot (2008-07-25)
Puget Sound area residents will get a second chance to vote on improving public transit. Last November, a 47 billion dollar ballot measure was rejected. So Sound Transit is trying again. KPLU's Shirley Skeel has more.


Hindsight is 20/20 (2008-07-24)
When it comes to personal finances, many of us are feeling nostalgic for the summer of 2007. Stocks prices were a lot higher and gasoline cost less than three-dollars-a-gallon. Things have changed quite a bit in the past 12 months. KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Wolf Discovery Leads to Concerns (2008-07-24)
The discovery of a full blooded wolf carcass in Stevens County has raised concerns with county officials. Reporter Steve Jackson has more.


Alaska Airlines Cuts Jobs (2008-07-24)
Seattle-based Alaska Airlines plans to cut jobs and tighten its frequent flier program. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


Is the Hanford Vitrification Plant an Eastern Washington boondoggle? (2008-07-24)
Imagine radioactive goo the consistency of peanut butter that has leaked into the soil at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southcentral Washington State. Federal officials say they have a final solution for this nuclear garbage. It's called the Vitrification Plant, or the Vit Plant for short.


How Much is Puget Sound Worth? (2008-07-24)
Does Nature have a dollar value? A new study calculates that the Puget Sound's natural ecosystems perform services that are worth billions every year. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains


New medical college opens (2008-07-23)
A new medical college is opening this week - in Yakima. It's a school of osteopathic medicine, and its founders hope it'll fix the ongoing shortage of physicians in rural eastern Washington. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld has more:


Growing Columbia Gorge Business Snapped Up By Boeing (2008-07-23)
Did you know that, in the Columbia Gorge, workers are designing unmanned spy planes? Well, it's true. The company is called Insitu and it just got snapped up by Boeing for nearly 400-million-dollars. KPLU's Anna King has the story.


Boat Business Sinks (2008-07-23)
It's the high-point of the summer boating season right now - but the biggest boat-seller in the Northwest is declaring bankruptcy. More from KPLU's Keith Seinfeld.


Food for Thought: Wedding Gifts for Foodies (2008-07-23)
It's the season for weddings. If you're wondering what to get the couple who loves to cook, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein she has the answer - on today's Food for Thought.


Report: Cement Plants Big Mercury Polluters (2008-07-23)
Two cement plants in Seattle are among dozens nationwide that altogether spew tons of mercury into the air each year. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


WaMu Losses - More than a Billion a Month (2008-07-22)
Washington Mutual reported a three point three billion dollar ($3.3B) loss for the second quarter - far worse than Wall Street was anticipating. More now from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Boat business sinks (2008-07-22)
It's the high-point of the summer boating season - but the biggest boat-seller in the Northwest is declaring bankruptcy. More from KPLU's Keith Seinfeld:


Hanford Tank Waste Continues to Bedevil Clean-Up Crews (2008-07-22)
The Hanford Nuclear site in South Central Washington is the most polluted radioactive waste dump in the country. At the center of the Hanford reservation are hundreds of buried tanks that hold waste left over from plutonium production during World War 2 and the Cold War, and there are problems: an accidental spill of tank waste shut down clean-up for nearly a year. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports in the first of a two-part series on Hanford clean-up efforts.


Controversy, Lawsuit Swirls Around WA Ballot Measure (2008-07-21)
A typographical error could keep a Washington State measure off the November ballot. Sponsors filed I-1029 as an initiative to the people, but the fine print on the petitions says it's an initiative to lawmakers. Now, opponents are poised to file a lawsuit to block the measure from reaching voters. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


All Eyes on WaMu (2008-07-21)
All eyes will be on Washington Mutual later today. Seattle's struggling savings and loan reports its second quarter earnings. Embattled CEO Kerry Killinger will address shareholders for the first time since he shed the role of company chairman. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Van Pools (2008-07-21)
Soaring gas prices have King County residents scrambling to cut back on trips in the car. Unfortunately, missing work isn't an option ... but that doesn't mean you have to take the bus. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


Good Audit for Seattle School District (2008-07-21)
State and federal audits show the Seattle School District is doing a better job of managing its finances. More from KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing.


High-Tech Tool Used On Clallam Shoreline (2008-07-21)
If you happen to be on the beach on the Strait of Juan de Fuca Monday and notice a boat carefully videotaping the shore, don't worry; you're not being spied on. It's a project that's using a high-tech tool to map the shoreline. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Primary May Decide Some State Supreme Court Races (2008-07-18)
Washington voters have until this Saturday (July 19th) to register by mail or on-line to vote in the August 19th primary election. That's also the deadline for updating your registration if you've moved. (Citizens not currently registered have until August 4th to register in person at their county auditor's office.) This year's primary will decide at least one Supreme Court race and perhaps two. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Health Budget Cuts (2008-07-18)
King County's expected sixty-eight million dollar budget shortfall for next year has alarmed not only law enforcement officers, but also the county's health officials. They say residents face serious cuts in public health services. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


Al Gore's 100% Renewable Goal Distant, Even in NW (2008-07-18)
Former vice president Al Gore is challenging the nation to generate every kilowatt of electricity from renewable sources within ten years. KPLU's Tom Banse reports the Northwest has a big head start toward that goal, if you count hydropower generation.


Thiel on Mariners at Midseason (2008-07-18)
The Mariners entered the All Star break this week as the worst team in the American League. They start the second half of the season with a weekend series against the Cleveland Indians at Safeco Field. According to Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel, the Mariners need to look beyond this season in order to become a winning team again.


UW Wants to Grow Branch Campuses (2008-07-18)
As the University of Washington plans for the future it is looking outside Seattle. President Mark Emmert wants to double enrollment at UW's branch campuses in Bothell and Tacoma. KPLU's Education Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt has the story


Tribal Canoes Double as Research Vessels (2008-07-18)
A traditional summer gathering of Native Americans paddling cedar canoes is taking on a new dimension. Some of the traditional vessels are towing high-tech sensors to collect information about water quality. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Hip Hop Music Used to Tempt Teens Off Mean Streets (2008-07-18)
Hip hop is the soundtrack of urban street life. Nightclubs that play the music can be a magnet for trouble. But a Christian social service group is convinced it can co-opt hip hop, and keep at-risk kids on the right path. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from Tacoma.


Modern Science Merges With Tribal Journey (2008-07-17)
The cedar canoes of the Coast Salish Indian tribes have traveled the inland waters of Washington and British Columbia for centuries. Now, a traditional tribal gathering is also being used to gather scientific data on water quality around the region. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Vacation or Staycation ? (2008-07-17)
Has the economy affected your summer vacation plans? Many people are staying close to home this year. But financial commentator Greg Heberlein says you may want to think twice before committing to a staycation .


Spinal Map (2008-07-17)
When your finger recoils from a sharp object, the reflex is happening in your spinal cord, where bundles of cells act like a little brain. Now, a team of scientists in Seattle is helping unravel secrets of the spinal cord. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld explains.


Fire Conditions Improve , But Weekend Weather a Worry (2008-07-17)
The Northwest's largest forest fire burning near Mt. Adams (Washington) is now five percent contained. The Cold Springs Fire has burned more than 7-thousand acres since taking off on Sunday. Elsewhere around the region, firefighters are getting a bit of a breather. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this regional fire round-up.


Natural Gas Prices Expected to Skyrocket this Winter (2008-07-16)
Even if you're riding your bike to work these days, you may not be able to avoid the sting of rising energy prices. The cost to heat your home could jump dramatically this winter. Chris Lehman reports concerns being voiced in Oregon...are echoed here in Washington.


Boeing Machinists Gather for Strike Authorization (2008-07-16)
After two months of contract talks, the local Aerospace Machinists Union is unhappy with the Boeing Company. Thousands of members walked off the job today (Wednesday) and went to Key Arena in Seattle, where the union conducted a strike authorization vote. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp was there.


Boeing Machinists Brace for Strike (2008-07-16)
It's our time, this time! That was the rally cry as thousands of members of Boeing's Aerospace Machinists' union gathered at Key Arena in Seattle. The union says it's pay-back time after years of concessions. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Controversy Continues Over Grazing on WA Wildlife Lands (2008-07-16)
Should ranchers be allowed to graze their cattle on state wildlife lands? It was the topic of a public hearing in Ellensburg last night (Tuesday night). KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports on the ongoing debate.


U.S. Army Deserter Deported From B.C. (2008-07-16)
The Canadian government has deported the first of an estimated 200 American soldiers who've fled to Canada to avoid service in Iraq. A small crowd of Iraq War opponents protested the deportation at the Peace Arch border crossing in Blaine. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Food for Thought: Fun With Crabs (2008-07-16)
Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson's been feeling crazed for crustaceans lately - as she tells KPLU's Dick Stein on this week's Food for Thought


High Gas Prices Driving Students to Online Classes (2008-07-15)
Here's another way high gas prices are changing the way we live. More college students are opting to take courses online to cut the days they have to commute to class. KPLU's Tom Banse has the story.


Bacteria Cause Decline in Northwest Oysters (2008-07-15)
If you like oysters on the half shell or perhaps fried with cocktail sauce, listen up. Soon your favorite bivalve is going to cost more. And as KPLU's Anna King reports, it's all because of a pesky bacteria.


How School Districts are Cutting Back (2008-07-15)
School districts across Washington State are trying creative ways to save money. As KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing reports, many districts are facing six and seven figure deficits.


ICE Refutes Report of Mistreatment (2008-07-15)
Federal immigration officials are disputing claims that detainees were mistreated by U.S. Marshals on transportation flights. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


Immigrant Detention Criticized (2008-07-15)
A human rights group claims immigrants are being mistreated at the federal detention center in Tacoma. The report was issued by OneAmerica, formerly known as Hate Free Zone. More from KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel.


Looming Budget Deficit Expected to be Major Issue in Governor's Race (2008-07-14)
By some calculations, the next governor of Washington State will face a nearly three-billion-dollar shortfall. This promises to be a top issue in the gubernatorial race. But how much do voters care? And could it sway the election? KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Researchers Still Hoping to Help Entangled Whale (2008-07-14)
Researchers are still on the lookout for a young humpback whale dangerously entangled in crab-fishing lines. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has this update.


Toxic Sampling Begins in Bellingham Bay Cleanup (2008-07-14)
Workers on boats and barges have begun taking samples of sediment from a section of Bellingham Bay contaminated by decades of industrial development. It's part of a cleanup of Whatcom County's most contaminated site. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Lifting of Offshore Drilling Ban Could Have Little Effect in NW (2008-07-14)
President Bush has lifted an executive ban on offshore oil drilling. But that doesn't mean you'll spot an oil rig on your next trip to the coast. KPLU's Chris Lehman explains.


NW Biofuels Industry Getting Help in a Pinch (2008-07-13)
With gas prices continuing to climb, you'd think it would be a good time to be an alternative fuel producer. But the West's ethanol and biodiesel industries are in a pinch. Prices for their product have gone up even faster than for petroleum. Plus, some consumers are questioning the true benefits of fuels made from food crops. KPLU's Tom Banse reports government policy makers are standing by the industry.


The Meaning of Work Summer Encore: Mail Carrier (2008-07-12)
This summer, we're re-airing highlights from our recently concluded series, The Meaning of Work. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt introduces us to someone who visits your home nearly every day. Not a friend, or a neighbor, but the mail carrier. We walk the route with Andrea Demajewsky.


Large Northwest Cities Growing at Moderate Pace (2008-07-11)
Just three Northwest places appear in the top 100 on a new US Census list of fastest growing cities with populations over 100-thousand. The list is dominated by Sun Belt cities. KPLU's Tom Banse has more on who's growing and who's shrinking in our region.


Thiel on Schultz-Sonics Lawsuit (2008-07-11)
Even though the Sonics have already moved to Oklahoma City, a lawsuit filed by former owner Howard Schultz is still moving forward in Seattle federal court. Schultz is trying to rescind the sale of the team to Clay Bennett, claiming he didn't make a good faith effort to keep the team in Seattle. The NBA this week asked to intervene in the case. It's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Hanford Workers Get Another Shot at Compensation (2008-07-11)
Hundreds of people lined up in Richland (in the Tri-Cities) to get their shot at hundreds of thousands of dollars. But this was no lottery. The money is being paid out to workers whose jobs at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation made them gravely ill. The federal government is reopening many cases that were previously denied. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Sound Transit Ponders New Ballot Measure (2008-07-11)
Sound Transit is crafting a possible new ballot measure. It promises expanded light rail, more commuter trains and increased bus service. But a divided Sound Transit board hasn't agreed yet to put it before voters this fall. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains.


Fuel Prices Claim More Airline Service (2008-07-10)
Seattle, Spokane, Portland, Eugene, and Boise all lose direct flights to southern California after Labor Day. This, after ExpressJet Airlines announced it will cease service. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Reverse Mortgages (2008-07-10)
If you're retired and would like to tap into your home equity, one option is a reverse mortgage. But they aren't for everyone. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein explains the concept to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Gregoire Releases IRS Returns; Rossi Refuses (2008-07-10)
Governor Chris Gregoire - up for re-election - has released three years worth of tax returns. Her Republican opponent Dino Rossi says he will NOT release his. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


NW Universities Mull New State Ruling on Patrolling Dorms (2008-07-10)
Washington's Court of Appeals says university police officers have no right to randomly patrol dormitory hallways and common areas. The ruling has Washington universities reexamining their policies, while most Oregon universities say they will continue the practice. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Tree Farm Joins State "Working Forests" (2008-07-10)
Nearly a thousand acres of timber land in Snohomish County has just become part of Washington's public lands. State officials say it's another step toward protecting what they call "working forests" from the growing threat of development. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty went to check it out.


Sub Pop Turns 20 (2008-07-10)
This weekend, Sub Pop Records, a Seattle icon that put local rock music in front of millions, is celebrating its 20th birthday in style. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


Boeing Back in the Tanker Game (2008-07-09)
Boeing gets a new chance to bid on the disputed contract to build refueling tankers for the U.S. Air Force. The Pentagon says it will expedite the process and pick a new winner by the end of the year. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Food for Thought: Watching from the Counter (2008-07-09)
Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein talk a lot about eating food in their weekly conversations. But in this week's Food for Thought, Nancy and Dick discuss their love of watching cooks prepare the food.


Refueling Tanker Could Yet be Boeing Built (2008-07-09)
Boeing has another shot at building the next generation of refueling tankers for the U.S. Air Force. The Department of Defense is re-opening the competition. That's in response to the scathing report released by the Government Accountability Office last month. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has the story.


What Happens When a Business Owner is Deployed to War? (2008-07-09)
Later this summer, roughly 24-hundred members of the Washington State National Guard will deploy to Iraq - some for the second time. This means leaving behind not just families but JOBS in the civilian world. By law, employers are required to hold those jobs. But what if you own your own business? That presents a special hardship. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Defense Secretary Visits Fort Lewis (2008-07-09)
Defense Secretary Robert Gates is expected to announce today whether he intends to rebid the Air Force tanker contract that Boeing lost. Gates hinted that his decision was coming soon, during a visit to Fort Lewis yesterday. It was part of a two-day tour of Northwest military installations. KPLU's Austin Jenkins was there.


Lingering Snow, Late Berry Season Brings More Bear Complaints (2008-07-09)
Wildlife agents around the region are fielding more bear complaints than usual this month. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on why bears are busting bird feeders and raiding garbage cans in high summer.


Farmers Growing More Wheat in Response to High Prices (2008-07-09)
Northwest farmers are expected to harvest a half million more acres of wheat this year than last. They're hoping for continued record high prices brought on by a world-wide shortage of the grain. KPLU's Anna King reports.


WA Political Parties Warn Top-Two Primary Results May Not Count (2008-07-09)
The state's political parties are warning that the August 19th statewide primary may not count. They say that's because of unresolved questions over the legality of a top-two primary system. The Secretary of State says he's not concerned. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports


Seattle Superintendent's First Year (2008-07-08)
Schools had been closed. The board wasn't getting along. Public confidence was low. That's the Seattle School District Maria Goodloe-Johnson inherited one year ago. She came from Charleston, South Carolina to take over as superintendent. On Goodloe-Johnson's one year anniversary, KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes a look back:


Hearing Tuesday on Plan B Rule in WA (2008-07-08)
A court hearing is scheduled today in the ongoing fight over whether pharmacists in Washington State must provide the morning after pill. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Wineries Hold Their Own Despite Economy & Gas Prices (2008-07-08)
Will high gas prices and a slowing economy put a cork in Northwest wine sales? Not so far. That's the word from Washington and Oregon wine country. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Olympic Track Trials Bring Thrills, Agony to Couples (2008-07-07)
Running is largely an individual sport. But several couples from the Northwest tried to make this year's US Olympic team TOGETHER. The Olympic Track and Field Trials wrapped up last night (Sunday) in Eugene, OR. KPLU's Tom Banse reports if any of the elite pairs made it.


Negative Ads Start Early in Governor's Race (2008-07-07)
The Fourth of July may be over...but that doesn't mean the fireworks are. The political fireworks, that is. Independent ad campaigns have launched on both sides of the gubernatorial race. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this in-depth report.


Memoirs of a Bulimic Black Boy (2008-07-07)
What if you were 15 years old and trying to fit in, but all your defining characteristics were anything but mainstream? Seattle based poet Chad Goller-Sojourner chronicles his childhood eating disorder, and also explores issues of race, class and gender in his new solo show premiering this week. KPLU's Florangela Davila invited him into our studio for an interview.


Olympic Trials Wrap Up On High Note (2008-07-07)
The US has finished selecting members for its 2008 Olympic teams in two popular sports: swimming and track & field. Only a handful of Northwesterners made the cut at the swimming trials in Omaha, Nebraska. But the story is much happier from the track and field trials. They were held in Eugene, Oregon. KPLU's Tom Banse reports local athletes came through in a big way.


Mexican Rodeos Multiply in the Northwest (2008-07-07)
You're used to seeing taco trucks and Mexican grocery stores. But there's a new import heading north. It's Mexican rodeo. It's different from the American version. It's also controversial. KPLU's Anna King went to a Mexican rodeo in Outlook, a small town in Eastern Washington.


4th of July Citizenship (2008-07-07)
Every Fourth of July hundreds of immigrants take part in a naturalization ceremony at the Seattle Center. This year we sent KPLU'S Daysha Eaton.


Seattle Ponders Green Fee for Disposable Bags (2008-07-07)
Paper or plastic? Whatever the answer, it may start costing you extra. The Seattle City Council wants to know what you think of its proposal to add a 20-cent per bag green fee on disposable grocery bags. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Seattle School Board to Vote on Budget (2008-07-07)
Rising prices for food and fuel are causing school districts across Washington State to cut back their budgets. This is not the case for the Seattle School District. The school board is voting on its budget Wednesday night. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing has more.


The Meaning of Work Summer Encore: Walrus Trainer (2008-07-05)
For the next two months on Weekend Edition Saturday, we'll be re-airing highlights from our recently concluded series, The Meaning of Work. If you heard any of the segments, you know that we visited with everyone from mail carriers to software engineers. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp begins our encore presentation with a profile of a walrus trainer at the Point Defiance zoo in Tacoma.


Thiel on Sonics Leaving Town (2008-07-04)
With the Sonics now headed to Oklahoma City, basketball fans and sports experts in Seattle are left to digest the settlement that sent them packing. It's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


BC Fish Farm Escape Riles Enviros (2008-07-04)
The escape of 30,000 Atlantic salmon from a British Columbia fish farm is renewing calls to require aquaculture companies to raise their fish in closed containers. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Metro Fares Keep Going Up (2008-07-04)
Gas prices are now averaging $4.35 per gallon statewide. That's up $1.27 in the past year. The pain at the pump is causing more people to ride city buses in Seattle and King County. It's also about to cause another fare hike from Metro Transit. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has the story.


Real-Estate: Selling Your House (2008-07-03)
Our region's housing market is still healthy, but most homes are taking longer to sell. In this month's real estate commentary, KPLU's John Maynard talks with Richard Hagar, an educator and appraiser, about ways to get your house noticed by all the buyers out there.


Prayer and Cheers for WA Right to Die Initiative (2008-07-03)
Washington State is one step closer to adopting an Oregon-style Death with Dignity law. Supporters of I-1000 have submitted well over the number of signatures they need to get the measure on this November's ballot. As KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports, opponents prayed while supporters cheered.


Metro Planning for Higher Bus Fares (2008-07-03)
High Gas Prices might have you considering leaving your car at home and riding the city bus. But Metro Transit says it's feeling the pain at the pump too. You can expect fares to go up by a quarter this fall. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Salmon Escape BC Fish Farm (2008-07-03)
An estimated 30,000 thousand Atlantic salmon have escaped from a fish farm in British Columbia. That's got Indians and environmentalists fuming over what they say is one more assault on dwindling wild salmon stocks. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Food for Thought: Captain Bay-Schmidt's Chicken (2008-07-02)
On this week's Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson shares with KPLU's Dick Stein a terrific recipe for chicken cooked in a charcoal grill.


WA Foster Care System Says it Needs More Money (2008-07-02)
Washington's foster care system needs more money if it's going to reduce social worker caseloads. That's the response from the Department of Social and Health Services after a judge's ruling Monday. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Starbucks Closing 600 Stores Nationwide (2008-07-02)
Some Starbucks customers may soon have to drive a bit farther to get their caffeine fix. The Seattle-based coffee giant has announced it will close 600 underperforming stores nationwide. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Sonics and City Settle (2008-07-02)
The Seattle Super Sonics are leaving the city they've called home since 1967. The city settled with team owner Clay Bennett, who is moving the NBA franchise to Oklahoma City. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, the city of Seattle gets to keep the Sonics name, but there's no assurance it'll ever have another basketball team to give it to.


Legal Glitch Ensnares Five Juvenile Lifers (2008-07-01)
Five juvenile murderers in Oregon are waging a legal battle against the state. They say that because of a legal glitch they've been given much harsher sentences than if they'd been older when they committed their crimes. So far, the courts have not been moved. And the state isn't backing down. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports, in Part Two of our series on "juvenile lifers."


Ex-Husky Secures Trip to Beijing in Pole Vault (2008-07-01)
Day three of the Olympic Trials in Eugene featured the first five events of the decathlon and the final in the men's pole vault. Northwest athletes are making their presence known, as Andrew Theen reports.


Makah Whalers Get Jail Time (2008-07-01)
Two Makah Indian whale hunters are behind bars. They were jailed yesterday (Monday) immediately after a judge sentenced them for leading an illegal whale hunt last September. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Recent Frying Temperatures Can Damage Potatoes (2008-07-01)
If you've felt like you're wilting in our recent hot weather, think of a potato. Northwest potatoes like heat. But when it gets into the hundreds, the plants suffer. That's bad news for the State's French fry processors, as KPLU's Anna King explains.


Enviros Praise, Pan State Lawmakers (2008-07-01)
Want to know how your state legislators have voted on environmental issues? The Washington League of Conservation Voters has released its scorecard of green heroes and zeroes. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Sonics Ruling Expected (2008-07-01)
Will they stay or will they go? A decision is expected Wednesday afternoon in the Sonics trial. Owner Clay Bennett wants to move the basketball team to Oklahoma. Seattle doesn't want to let him out of his lease. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, whatever the ruling, the legal battles aren't over for the team.


Alaska/Horizon Second Bag Fee in Effect (2008-07-01)
Starting today, Seattle-based Alaska and Horizon Airlines have joined the ranks of air carriers charging for a second checked bag. Officials say high fuel costs and a weaker economy are forcing changes in how the business operates. Ed Schoenfeld reports.


New State Law: Plug in that Handset and Drive (2008-06-30)
The State Patrol says it will have NO grace period for drivers who violate the state's new cell phone ban. The law goes into effect after midnight tonight (Monday). It makes it illegal to drive while holding a cell phone to your ear. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Fewer Wheels with Meals (2008-06-30)
Local agencies that deliver meals and groceries to the homebound are losing volunteer drivers faster than they can replace them. High gas prices get the blame. It's a hard problem to solve, as KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Ex-Cougar Starts Run for Gold in Eugene (2008-06-30)
He competed for his native Kenya at the past two Olympics. Tonight (Monday) in Eugene, this same runner competes for a spot on the US Olympic squad bound for Beijing. As KPLU's Tom Banse explains, the change in allegiances was nurtured in the Northwest.


Summer School Enrollment Up (2008-06-30)
Many children across the region are celebrating summer vacation. But a growing number are about to head back to the classroom for summer school. KPLU Education reporter Chana Joffe-Walt explains


Life in Prison for Juveniles: Is it Good Public Policy? (2008-06-30)
It's been ten years (May 1998) since Kip Kinkel shot and killed his parents and then opened fire at his school in Springfield, Oregon. Kinkel is serving a 111-year sentence. He is one of at least 60 juvenile murderers serving life sentences in Northwest prisons. Some will die in prison. Others have a chance at parole. But is it good public policy to prosecute juveniles as adults and sentence them to life? In part one of the series, KPLU's Austin Jenkins takes us behind bars in search of answers.


Environmentally Friendly Funerals: A Conversation with Mark Harris (2008-06-28)
Like most of us, you're probably looking for ways to lead a greener life. But what about a greener death? KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty recently spoke with journalist Mark Harris. He's the author of Grave Matters: A Journey Through the Modern Funeral Industry to a Natural Way of Burial. Harris was in Seattle to speak at the national conference of the Funeral Consumers Alliance.


State Fish and Wildlife Investigates Reports of Wolf Pack (2008-06-27)
The State Department of Fish and Wildlife is intensively investigating photographs and reports of wolves in North Central, Washington. But so far, the agency says there's NO proof that a pack of wolves has taken up residence in the state. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Thiel on Sonics Trial (2008-06-27)
The City of Seattle's lawsuit against the Sonics is now in the hands of a federal judge. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel was in the courtroom for closing arguments this week, and shared his thoughts on the trial with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick.


Northwest Firefighters Head to California (2008-06-27)
More than 25-hundred firefighters from the Northwest have been sent to Northern California to join the fight against the escalating wildfires there. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Neah Bay Rescue Tug To Return Year-Round (2008-06-27)
The oil-spill prevention tug boat stationed at the mouth of the Strait of Juan de Fuca returns to duty next week. For the first time, the tug will be available year-round. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Gun Ruling (2008-06-27)
In a landmark ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court has affirmed the right of individuals to own a gun under the Second Amendment. But it won't change much here in Washington. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


Hand-held Cell Phone Ban to Take Effect (2008-06-27)
That cell phone law the state Legislature passed last year is finally going into effect. In January, it became illegal to text while driving. And next week, it becomes illegal to talk on a cell phone -- without a hands-free device. KPLU's Daysha Eaton has more.


Solar Power (2008-06-26)
Is there a bright side to the high price of gas? Our technology commentator, Mark Anderson, hopes it will spur the development of alternative energy. He spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Teen Jobs (2008-06-26)
The number of available jobs for teenagers is down this summer, but then so is the number of teens looking for the work that is available. We have more from John Vlahovich from Spokane Public Radio.


Highway Tolls Seem Likely (2008-06-26)
Paying tolls for driving on bridges and highways is common on the East Coast. Here in Washington, drivers have long been accustomed to cruising the public roads for free. But if the talk at a policy workshop in Seattle Thursday is any indication, tolls are an inevitable part of our transportation future. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story.


Are Privately Operated Highways in Your Future? (2008-06-26)
Western Washington is coming up tens of billions of dollars short of what's needed for highway improvements, bridge replacements and transit infrastructure. Tolls and more involvement by the private sector were among the solutions discussed at a workshop in Seattle Thursday. KPLU's Liam Moriarty has more ...


U.S. Supreme Court - Valdez Damages (2008-06-26)
Coastal fishermen are reviewing the Supreme Court's decision on damages for the Exxon Valdez disaster. April Baer reports from Oregon Public Radio that yesterday's (Wednesday's) decision dashed the hopes of thousands of Northwest fishermen who lost work because of the spill.


Tacoma Goodwill Breaks New Ground (2008-06-25)
One of the state's largest worker training programs is expanding. Tacoma Goodwill broke ground on a new Workforce Development Center this afternoon. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Boeing Had "Substantial Chance" of Winning Tanker (2008-06-25)
If not for mistakes made by the Air Force, "Boeing would have had a substantial chance of being selected" for the $35-billion-dollar air-tanker-refueling contract. That's from the full 67-page report now made public by the federal Government Accountability Office. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


GAO Releases Full Report on Tanker Dispute (2008-06-25)
Boeing says it's a validation of the company's decision to file a protest. The federal Government Accountability Office has released its full 67-page report on the tanker dispute. It confirms that the competition was skewed in favor of Northrup- Grumman and its partner, European Aeronautic Defense and Space. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Will There Be Enough Labor for the NW Fruit Harvest? (2008-06-25)
Northwest farmers are unsure if there will be enough labor to harvest the region's fruit this summer and fall. The sinking economy, high gas prices and low cherry yields are all playing a part. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Seattle & Portland Housing Prices Up (2008-06-25)
A new home price index released this week shows US housing prices suffering record declines in April. But for Seattle and Portland, home prices actually posted slight gains. Even so, as Pete Springer reports from Oregon Public Broadcasting, the Northwest housing market is weaker than a year ago.


Food for Thought: Chinese Food (2008-06-25)
On this week's Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein talk about Chinese food. And why they love it.


WA Study: Racial Bias in Child Welfare System? (2008-06-25)
Is there racial bias in the state's child welfare system? A new study released today (Wednesday) suggests the answer might be yes. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Blood Pressure Treatment Advanced Via Web (2008-06-24)
If you're among the millions of Americans with high blood pressure, you know treatment can sometimes demand repeated doctor visits. Now dramatic results from a study of people with the condition show web-based care, with assistance from pharmacists, can provide success. KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis explains.


Hanford Demolition (2008-06-24)
Over the weekend, the federal government used explosives to demolish parts of the N Reactor at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation [in Southeast Washington.] The reactor is one of nine that once produced plutonium during the Cold War. The demolition is part of ongoing cleanup at Hanford. KPLU's Anna King reports from Richland.


The African American Achievement Gap (2008-06-24)
African American students, especially boys, have some of the highest drop-out rates in Washington State. Many also struggle on the WASL exam. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing tells us a new committee is looking at ways to close this achievement gap.


520 Bridge Options to be Discussed (2008-06-24)
The latest designs for the much-debated 520 floating bridge replacement are up for public comment. Transportation officials are holding open-house meetings in Seattle and Bellevue to explain the plans. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Meth and Kids in Washington State (2008-06-24)
An increase in crime and identity theft both are linked to the use of methamphetamine. But what does the drug do to children? KPLU's Jennifer Wing reports.


Saving Historic Churches (2008-06-24)
Still reeling from the loss of one historic landmark, some people in Tacoma are hoping to save others. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports on an effort to preserve the city's churches.


Interior Designers Want New Laws (2008-06-24)
Interior designers say they're different from home decorators, who pick out pillow colors and bed spreads. That's why groups of designers want the state to pass new laws to govern their industry. They want to require a certain level of education and skill before someone can call themselves an 'interior designer.' Critics say the designers are trying to stifle competition. KPLU's Anna King has the story.


Meth Problems Spread to Kids (2008-06-24)
Adults who are addicted to methamphetamine aren't the only people hurt by the highly addictive drug. KPLU's Jennifer Wing tells us more and more child care workers and teachers are seeing the harm meth does to children.


Foreclosures Help Papers (2008-06-23)
You hear a lot about how the major newspapers are struggling because of the loss of classified ad revenue. But it's a different story for community papers. They're packed with classifieds. The reason? The mortgage crisis. KPLU's Paula Wissel explains.


Clean Car Rules Start to Kick In (2008-06-23)
The new 2009 models are starting to arrive at car dealerships in Washington. And according to a law passed four years ago, those cars now have to meet stricter California emissions standards mostly. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains.


Class Aims to Take the Fight Out of Water Disputes (2008-06-23)
There's a saying in the West: whiskey is for drinking, water is for fighting. But what if you could take the fight out of water conflicts? Oregon State University is offering a series of courses that aims to do just that. The goal is to teach water users to make peace, not war. But will it work? KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


NW Whitewater Rafters Loving Huge Snowpack and Slow Melt Off (2008-06-23)
Whitewater river rafting companies say this may be one of the longest and busiest whitewater seasons in years. The combination of a massive mountain snowpack and an unusually cool spring has set the stage for a slow and lengthy snowmelt. It's likely to keep rapids running well into the summer. KPLU's Anna King caught up with a Northwest guide for this report.


Olympic Trials: The Big Leap (2008-06-22)
Later this week, hundreds of the nation's top runners, jumpers, and throwers descend on Eugene, Oregon for the US Olympic Track and Field Trials. About a dozen athletes with Northwest ties could "punch their tickets" to Beijing. University of Washington grad Brad Walker enters the Olympic Trials as the man to beat in the pole vault. The most technically demanding track & field event attracts risk takers... and Walker says he's no exception. KPLU's Tom Banse has this profile.


Green Collar Jobs to be Focus of Conference (2008-06-20)
As part of Washington's response to global warming, the state has set a goal of creating 25,000 so-called green-collar jobs. How to do that is the focus of a conference to be held Saturday at the University of Washington. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has this preview.


State of Oregon Relaxes Its Policy on Posting State Laws Online (2008-06-20)
The state of Oregon says it's going to stop harassing people who post the text of state laws online. A legislative panel has voted to back down in the face of threatened lawsuits. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Signs of NW Economic Woes (2008-06-20)
Unemployment is up and state revenues are down. That's the economic reality in the Northwest these days - as underscored by two fresh developments yesterday (Thursday). KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Thiel on Mariner Firings (2008-06-20)
With the Mariners still holding the worst record in baseball, the team has made another big change. They've fired Manager John McClaren just days after firing General Manager Bill Bavasi. It's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Impact of War: Feedback (2008-06-19)
This week we've been running a series about how the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are affecting the lives of families and children here in the Northwest. Now it's time to hear from you. How these conflicts are changing YOUR life, if at all. KPLU's Jennifer Wing shares some of your responses.


Cruise Line for Sale; Northwest Sailings Cut Back (2008-06-19)
A regional cruise ship company is on the sales block. Majestic America is experiencing sluggish bookings. The cruise line is cutting back fall sailings on the Columbia and Snake rivers and dropping late summer tours in southeast Alaska. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


WA Inmates to Help Rebuild Burned Elk Fence (2008-06-19)
It's not a prison chain gang. But dozens of Washington state inmates have a tough summer job ahead of them. They will help rebuild miles of elk fence that was destroyed by wildfire three years ago. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Research Dollars Fuel Washington Economy (2008-06-19)
It's no secret that health science research money is big business in Washington. And one agency, in particular, provides the fuel for a lot of it. KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis explains.


WaMu Capital Infusion Vote (2008-06-19)
Next Tuesday, Washington Mutual shareholders meet in SeaTac to vote on a proposal to inject more cash into the company. Financial Commentator Greg Heberlein looks at the deal with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Impact of War: Iraqi Boy Becomes American (2008-06-18)
The war in Iraq is an adult conflict but children often get caught up in the violence. One of the children is named Hamoody Jouda. Today KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt brings us the story of how one war, two traumatized parents, a team of medical experts and an American couple have left Hamoody stuck between Baghdad and Snohomish, Washington


NW Relief Organization Takes Micro-financing to Next Level (2008-06-18)
Northwest relief organization is the new owner of an Indonesian bank. Leaders at MercyCorps say the purchase will make it possible to provide small loans to millions of poor people. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Boeing Wins GAO Ruling on Tanker Contract (2008-06-18)
Boeing might still win the contract to build re-fueling tankers for the US Air Force. The federal Government Accountability Office has ruled that the process was flawed when Boeing lost the high-stakes competition for the contract in March. Now, the U.S. Air Force has to decide what to do next. More from KPLU Business and Labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Glass Tombstones (2008-06-18)
There's a new shopping experience in Seattle. Stroll downtown and you can buy food for some new togs, or if you're in the mood, you can now pick out your own glass tombstone. KPLU's Shirley Skeel has more.


GAO Ruling is Victory for Boeing and its Backers (2008-06-18)
It's a decision that stunned and delighted politicians, analysts and aerospace workers all over the Northwest. The Government Accountability Office heeded Boeing's call and backed its criticism of the U.S. Air Force procurement process. Now, Boeing is back in the running to get a contract to build the military's re-fuelling tankers - worth 35-billion dollars. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has the story.


Food for Thought: Hideous Snacks (2008-06-18)
She had no choice - they double-dog dared her! On this week's Food for Thought, we bring back one of our favorites, when Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson told KPLU's Dick Stein about the culinary pleasures of Larvettes.


State Economic Picture Clouded by Joblessness (2008-06-17)
For the first time in nearly two years, Washington's unemployment rate is higher than five percent. At five point three percent, it's still below the national average, but evidence of a slowdown is mounting. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Group Health Consolidating on East Side (2008-06-17)
Group Health Cooperative is celebrating completion of a new medical center for specialty services on the east side of Lake Washington. Doctors and staff who currently report to Redmond for work are moving into a state-of-the-art facility in Bellevue. The co-op's administrators promise the added expense will bring improved care for members. More from KPLU Business and Labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Impact of War on Children: Support from the Schools (2008-06-17)
Having a mom or a dad away, at war, is stressful. To help fill the void, some schools are trying to reach out to these children. As a part of our week-long focus on how war is affecting families in the Northwest, we take you to an elementary school in Dupont, Washington. KPLU's Jennifer Wing reports.


New Competitor in Seattle-to-Portland Skies (2008-06-17)
In two weeks (6/30), a new airline takes to the Northwest skies. SeaPort Air will compete for business travelers on the Seattle to Portland route. KPLU's Tom Banse reports it's an interesting time to start an airline, to say the least.


State Unemployment Rate Jumps Up (2008-06-17)
The state's seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate saw a big jump from April to May. It went up more than half a point - to five point three percent. But, local economists say the picture's still better here than in the rest of the nation. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Sonics Fans Rally at U.S. Courthouse (2008-06-17)
The lawsuit between the City of Seattle and Seattle Sonics basketball club owners is underway. As the first day's testimony closed, nearly two-thousand fans crowded outside the front doors of the U-S Courthouse to rally in favor of the franchise. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


WASL Results for 2009 Class (2008-06-16)
Next year's high school graduates appear to be on track to getting a diploma. KPLU education reporter fills us in on the latest WASL numbers.


CEO Search for Seattle Public Library (2008-06-16)
It's one of Seattle's most important cultural institutions and an increasingly popular tourist destination. The city's public library system is looking for a new leader. The search will include input from both the local public and a high-profile headhunter. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Big Shoes to Fill at Seattle Public Library (2008-06-16)
Seattle's City Librarian, Deborah Jacobs, made her mark over the past eleven years. She presided over an expansion that included the modernization of twenty seven branches, including the famous downtown building. Jacobs is moving on next month. Now, the Seattle Public Library's board is asking for help in its search for a new leader. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


What Initiatives Can You Expect on Fall Ballot? (2008-06-16)
Northwest initiative backers have less than a month left to collect enough signatures to get their measures on the November ballot. The deadline in Washington and Oregon is July 3rd. So what measures are likely to make the ballot? KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this preview.


Impact of War on Kids: A Parent Deployed (2008-06-16)
As we continue to look at the wars and children this week, we turn now to the kids who get left behind. According to the Pentagon 1.7 million children have had one or both parents deployed since 9/11. Those moms and dads now have more opportunities to keep in touch with their kids than ever before. But is it really possible to parent from a warzone? KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes up that question with one Thurston County teenager and her deployed dad:


Global Nutrition Gets Seattle Hearing (2008-06-16)
Organizers of a childhood nutrition summit in Seattle say it doesn't get enough attention. The issue: the world's malnourished children. KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis has more.


Impact of War: Can't Tell You What My Mom Does (2008-06-14)
We hear a lot these days from generals, veterans and politicians about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. This week, KPLU brings you a special series to introduce other voices-- those of children affected by the wars. Today, we focus on the Al-Zubaidi boys. They recently fled Iraq for the US because their mother's job put the family in jeopardy. She was an interpreter for US forces in Iraq and she's moved her family to Auburn. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Local Analysts Don't Like Google-Yahoo Deal (2008-06-13)
It's official. After months of rumors and speculation, Yahoo has announced it is teaming up with Google to go after the lucrative market of online advertising. That means Microsoft's talks on a full or partial acquisition of Yahoo have ended. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


South Korea Beef Ban Off; Beef Exports Still On Hold (2008-06-13)
South Koreans have taken to the streets of Seoul to protest beef. That's U.S. beef and the ban against it that was lifted in April. It's been nearly five years since exports were halted after a case of mad-cow disease was discovered in Mabton, Washington. Northwest meat packers are anxious to start up shipments. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Citizen Bloggers Gaining Clout Abroad (2008-06-13)
The Internet is empowering more and more people around the world to speak out. It's also leading to more arrests of those who do - that's according to new research from the University of Washington. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Northwest Not as Healthy as New England (2008-06-13)
Northwesterners are known for living an active, outdoor lifestyle. But New England "has us beat" in a new ranking of the healthiest states. KPLU's Austin Jenkins got a sneak peak at the report, which comes out today (Friday).


Thiel on Sonics Trial Preview (2008-06-13)
The City of Seattle's lawsuit against the Sonics goes to trial Monday in Seattle federal court. The city is trying to hold the team to the final two years on its Key Arena lease, while the ownership wants to move the team to Oklahoma City as soon as possible. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel takes issue with one of the arguments the Sonics owners plan to make at the trial. He talked with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick.


Choose Your Security Lane at the Airport (2008-06-13)
Many of us have experienced this airport aggravation: You're running late for your flight and then you get stuck in the security line behind a bunch of people who don't know what they're doing. At SeaTac, Portland, and the Spokane and Boise airports, the security lanes have been revamped to address this. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Assisted Suicide Measure Divides WA Democrats (2008-06-13)
Last month it was Republicans. Now, Washington State Democrats are descending on Spokane. The occasion: the state party convention. It will be held this weekend. Democrats say they're united behind Barack Obama. But the issue of assisted suicide could disrupt that unity. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Fear of Derivatives (2008-06-12)
Will the sub-prime loan disaster be followed by a new monetary crisis? Financial commentator Greg Heberlein is worried about the derivatives market. He spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Local Analysts Don't Like Google-Yahoo Deal (2008-06-12)
It's official. After months of rumors and speculation, Yahoo has announced it is teaming up with Google to go after the lucrative market of online advertising. That means Microsoft's talks on a full or partial acquisition of Yahoo have ended. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Microsoft Yahoo Deal Off - Google's On (2008-06-12)
It's the biggest Internet deal that never happened. Microsoft's bid for a proposed takeover of Yahoo is off the table. Yahoo has announced it's partnering with Google. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Northwest States Beef Up Programs to Protect Food (2008-06-12)
Tomatoes are hitting waste cans with a fury after nearly 200 people nationwide became sick from the bacteria salmonella. But did you know that Northwest states have a program in place to check regionally grown crops for nasty microbes? KPLU's Anna King has more.


WASL Leaves Some Seniors Without Diplomas (2008-06-12)
Last week education leaders were celebrating this fact - over 90 percent of the class of 2008 passed key sections of the WASL. But that celebration ignored the large number of students who failed the math section. To graduate those students were required to take an extra math class. And this week right before graduation grades are coming in. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


Life After Failing the WASL (2008-06-12)
This weekend and next week the Class of 2008 will graduate high school. The seniors were often referred to as the guinea pig class - the first required to pass the WASL. Last fall KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt introduced us to one senior who had failed the math WASL 3 times. Today, we check back in with Britney LaBoyne:


St. John's Wort & ADHD Study (2008-06-11)
Herbal treatments are popular with some parents to treat kids with Attention Deficit - Hyperactivity Disorder, or A.D.H.D. But new research into one commonly used herb showed it's no more effective than a sugar pill. KPLU health & science reporter Gary Davis explains.


Politics of Steep Slope Logging (2008-06-11)
Steep slope logging is likely to become a top issue in this fall's campaign for State Lands Commissioner. It became front page news after last winter's devastating storms in Southwest Washington. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Language of Politics (2008-06-11)
Democrats running for office could learn a lot from Republicans. That's the message from a California professor of Linguistics who has made a career out of studying the language of politics. More from KPLU's Paula Wissel.


Food for Thought: Tiny Fishies (2008-06-11)
On this week's Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein that some of her favorite fish are the small ones.


A Winning Candidate (2008-06-11)
Never underestimate the value of a good story. That's the advice of strategists from both political parties. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports on what the experts say it takes to wage a successful campaign.


Amtrak Travel Up (2008-06-10)
A lot of people are apparently finding an alternative to driving or flying on their vacation. Ridership on the train is way up. With more interest in rail travel, Amtrak has just given one of its most popular runs a makeover. More from KPLU's Paula Wissel.


Ferry Worker Says Border Patrol Asked Him to Spy (2008-06-10)
A few months ago, the U.S. Border Patrol raised hackles when agents started setting up checkpoints for ferry riders arriving in Anacortes from the San Juan Islands. The Border Patrol says it's looking for smugglers and illegal immigrants sneaking into the islands from Canada. Now, a ferry worker who the agency asked to gather information on passengers is making waves. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty.


Jazz and Baseball (2008-06-10)
With the Mariners still sitting at the bottom of the American League standings, we thought we'd talk about the LIGHTER SIDE of baseball. KPLU's Nick Morrison has put together a list of five great jazz songs about baseball. He talked about some of them with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick.


Mountain Safety Reminders After Mt. Rainier Tragedy (2008-06-10)
The blizzard that killed a Seattle climber on Mt. Rainier on Monday is a poignant reminder of how suddenly extreme weather conditions can turn fatal for even experienced mountaineers. In light of the tragedy, experts say "stick to the basics." More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Hanford Resumes Tank Waste Cleanup (2008-06-10)
Nearly 200 underground tanks of radioactive waste sit idle on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in Eastern Washington.) Following some big fines, the cleanup work is scheduled to get back underway this month. KPLU's Anna King has more.


Eastern WA Serves as Moon for NASA Practice (2008-06-10)
The space agency NASA has plans to go back to the moon by the end of the next decade. Long before any astronauts blast off, lunar rovers, robots and crew modules need to be tested under lifelike conditions. Would you believe the next best thing to stepping on the moon is a visit to Moses Lake? KPLU's Tom Banse explains.


Special Interests Line Up Behind WA Candidates (2008-06-10)
It's a big political year in Washington State. Beside a governor's race, voters will decide contests for attorney general and lands commissioner - to name a couple. So, what special interests are giving money to which candidates? KPLU's Austin Jenkins takes a peek at the finance reports.


Confidence Builds for NW Olympic Hopefuls (2008-06-09)
Olympic hopefuls from the Northwest did well in a preview of the US Olympic Track and Field Trials yesterday (Sunday). KPLU's Tom Banse reports from the Prefontaine Classic track meet in Eugene, Oregon.


Direct Flights Between Seattle and Beijing (2008-06-09)
An airplane that took off from Sea-Tac Airport this afternoon (Monday) has a lot of people celebrating. Hainan Airlines launched the first-ever direct flight between Seattle and Beijing, China. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Governor Campaigns Spend Out of State (2008-06-09)
The amount of money political candidates RAISE always gets a lot of attention. But how much they SPEND and where they spend it is often ignored.
KPLU's Austin Jenkins takes a look at out-of-state spending by the leading candidates in the governor's race.


High Gas Prices Hit the Oregon Coast (2008-06-09)
High gas prices are hitting the Oregon Coast. KPLU's Chris Lehman visits some coastal towns to find out how local businesses are coping with the tourist slow down.


World Premiere Namaste Man at Seattle's Intiman Theater (2008-06-06)
A new play had its world premiere at the Intiman Theater in Seattle this week. Tony-Award winner Bartlett Sher directed the show. It's called Namaste Man and it's a 90-minute monologue about the life of a New York actor, who grew up as an ex-patriot in Nepal. His name is Andew Weems. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp invited him to our studio for an interview.


Craig of The List Says Trust is King (2008-06-06)
It's one of those things that the Internet does really well - most of the time. Online communities allow people to exchange information - and goods and services - in all kinds of new ways. That's changing how we do everything from renting out apartments to finding a date. But, along with the growing legitimate uses - as KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has learned - there are more and more scams and pitfalls.


Thiel on Mariners' Woes (2008-06-06)
With emotional outbursts from the manager and even the team president this week, the Mariners have sunk to a new low. That's the opinion of Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel. He talked with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick.


BIAW Hits Gregoire with Independent Ad (2008-06-06)
The gloves are officially off in the Governor's race. Election Day is still five months away. But a conservative interest group has launched an independent ad campaign attacking Governor Chris Gregoire. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


A License to Scooter? (2008-06-05)
As gas prices continue to rise, more people are deciding to scoot to work. Scooter sales are up nearly 25-percent nationally. Dealers here in the Northwest confirm the trend. But what some new moped & scooter owners may not know is you need a motorcycle license to drive many of these two-wheelers. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Real Estate Commentary - Earthquake Insurance (2008-06-05)
What's the impact of earthquakes on home values? And does it make sense to retrofit your house and buy earthquake insurance? KPLU's John Maynard talks with Richard Hagar, a Seattle-based educator and appraiser.


Farmers Struggle With High Gas Prices (2008-06-05)
This week, French farmers rode their tractors into Paris to protest high gas prices. Northwest farmers are grumbling too, but not that much. Gas prices are up, but so are profits. KPLU's Anna King trekked into the fields outside of Basin City, Washington to bring us this story.


Flex Hours for Public Workers (2008-06-04)
Public workers are getting a chance to switch to a four day week to save on gas money. Washington State University has now joined the ranks of those offering flexible work hours to its employees. KPLU's Anna King has the story.


Orca Whales Return to Puget Sound (2008-06-04)
The killer whale family groups that spend the winter on the open ocean have returned to Puget Sound. And they've got a new baby in tow. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Tre Arrow Plea (2008-06-04)
Seven years after eco-saboteurs set fire to logging trucks outside the Mount Hood National Forest, radical environmentalist Tre Arrow has publicly acknowledged playing a role. Rob Manning reports from Portland.


Native American Root Gathering - Reporter's Notebook (2008-06-04)
This week we've brought you two stories on the sacred tradition of Native American root gathering. Now, for the story behind those stories. These features have been four years in the making. It took that long for KPLU's Anna King to gain the trust of Umatilla tribal members. Over those years, she has been attending ceremonies as an observer. This year, Anna was invited to participate. She has this reporter's notebook.


Food for Thought: High Priced Hog (2008-06-04)
On this week's Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson blogs about 40 dollar pork chops and KPLU's Dick Stein is shocked - simply shocked!


Northwest Clinton Supporters on Obama Nomination (2008-06-04)
With Barack Obama securing the Deomcratic nomination for president, some Hillary Clinton supporters here in Washington are switching their support to Obama. But others are sticking by their candidate. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this regional round-up.


Makah Whale Hunt Plan Gets Public Airing (2008-06-03)
In 1999, the Makah Indian tribe set off an international firestorm of protest when they resumed their traditional whale hunt after 70 years. If lots of people are still fired up about the tribe's desire to hunt whales, it was hard to tell at a public meeting in Seattle Monday night. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty was there


Oregon Money Flows into WA Right-to-Die Initiative Campaign (2008-06-03)
Opponents of a Washington right-to-die initiative are crying foul. They say an Oregon-based front group is funneling hundreds of thousands of dollars into the campaign and not disclosing all the names of its individual donors. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Native American Woman Fights to Preserve Culture (2008-06-03)
A middle-aged Native American woman from the Umatilla Reservation near Pendleton, Oregon is taking on a big responsibility. The grandmother wants to teach younger generations how to dig roots, pick berries and sing -- to be Indian. She fears modern life is overwhelming native culture. It's a common concern on reservations around the West.In the second part of her series, KPLU's Anna King has this profile of a woman trying to keep her culture alive.


WaMu CEO Sheds Chairman Role (2008-06-02)
Seattle-based Washington Mutual Corp has made some changes at the top. CEO Kerry Killinger remains in charge of the company, but has stepped down as chairman of its board. Another WaMu board member, Steven Frank, has moved into that position and so far, the stock market seems to like the news. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Washing Down the Space Needle (2008-06-02)
Seattle's iconic Space Needle is overdue for a bath. The gleaming white structure hasn't had a professional cleaning since it was built for the 1962 World's Fair. How do you get nearly 50 years worth of air pollution, urban grime and bird droppings off a 600-foot-tall building that looks like it escaped from an episode of The Jetsons? KPLU's Liam Moriarty talked to the guys doing it.


Top Two Primary Filing Begins (2008-06-02)
Even as political party bosses continue to fight the state in federal district court, a controversial new voting system takes effect in the state today (Monday). Amanda Loder reports.


Emotional Impact of War on Kids (2008-06-02)
Military children have often been described as being resilient . But a new study that focuses on military kids reveals some are experiencing high levels of stress when one of their parents is deployed. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


Sister Roots: NW Native Women Keep Root Digging Alive (2008-06-02)
Each year, Native American women travel into the mountains of the Pacific Northwest to dig edible roots for ceremonies and subsistence. Historically, roots are one of the staples of a native diet, but the food only makes it to the table with a lot of hard work. In the past few years, women have had to travel farther away as development and fences have made favorite digging spots harder to access. KPLU's Anna King heads to the hills with Umatilla tribal members to dig for this most sacred food.


Seattle's Chinese Community Gives to Quake Victims (2008-05-31)
Members of Seattle's Chinese community will come together this evening to raise money for victims of the earthquake and its many aftershocks in China's Sichuan province. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Speed Exhibit (2008-05-30)
If you love a fast car, a fast boat or even the roller coaster, you should check out the new exhibit at Seattle's Pacific Science Center -- called SPEED. KPLU's Shirley Skeel went along, in her crash helmet.


Thiel on Lofa Tatupu Arrest (2008-05-30)
Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel didn't want the month of May to get away without sharing his thoughts on the arrest of Seahawks star linebacker Lofa Tatupu. Tatupu was arrested on May 10th in Kirkland on suspicion of driving while intoxicated. It's not the first off-the-field incident for a Seahawks player, and Art tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick the team's image is suffering.


Northwest Winter Soldier Hearing in Seattle (2008-05-30)
You can support the troops while opposing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. That's the message many veterans and their allies are hoping to spread tomorrow (Saturday.) They're putting on a Winter Soldier hearing at Seattle's Town Hall and an anti-war march afterwards. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp has the story.


Canadian Refinery Pollutes the Columbia River Again (2008-05-30)
The State Department of Ecology is testing water near the Canadian border. This, after a Canadian mineral refinery, dumped lead and acid into the Columbia River this week. KPLU's Anna King has more.


New Wing Luke Asian Museum Opens (2008-05-30)
Seattle's International District is the site of a major celebration this weekend. After a 23-million-dollar renovation of an historic building, the Wing Luke Asian Museum opens in its new home. KPLU's Gary Davis paid a visit.


Fort Lewis Stryker Brigade Begins Returning From Iraq (2008-05-30)
Members of a Fort Lewis Stryker Brigade have returned home after 15-months in Iraq. A welcome home ceremony was Thursday for the first group of soldiers to return. KPLU's Austin Jenkins was there.


WA Republicans Hold Convention (2008-05-29)
State Republicans descend on Spokane today. An estimated 14-hundred party faithful will attend the State GOP Convention. Top on the agenda: adopting a new party platform and electing delegates to the national convention. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Narrows Toll Hike Elicits Grumbles, Support (2008-05-29)
There's lots of grumbling about them. But no one is expected to oppose them. Tolls for drivers crossing the Tacoma Narrows bridge will go up by a dollar starting July 1st. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


High Tech Firefighting (2008-05-29)
Every spring, KPLU technology commentator Mark Anderson leaves his home in the San Juan Islands and heads to San Diego, where he puts on his annual Future In Review conference. It's attended by executives in the computing and telecommunications industries. This year's theme was rapid response to climate change. He tells KPLU's Dave Meyer about a panel where he matched up chief technology officers with firefighters to see if they could come up with better ways to fight wildfires.


Food for Thought: Copper River Salmon (2008-05-28)
Copper River Salmon is the topic of today's Food for Thought. Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein how she chowed down with the fishermen.


Northwest Food Banks See Demand Rise (2008-05-28)
As gas and food prices rise, more Northwest families are turning to food banks for help. Officials in Washington, Oregon and Idaho all report an uptick in the number of people they serve. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


USDA Report Outlines Global Warming Impacts (2008-05-28)
A major federal study confirms that global climate change is already affecting American agriculture, including Northwest forests, water supplies and fish stocks. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Child Health Improves With Access (2008-05-28)
Compared with other states, Washington's children have a better than average chance of leading long, healthy lives. According to a new national study, that's because the state is doing a better job than most to get kids insured. KPLU health and science reporter Gary Davis has more.


Washington's First Big Pot Bust of the Year (2008-05-28)
A Yakima Valley corn farmer found more than 10-thousand small pot plants on his property late last week. It's the first big outdoor marijuana bust of the year in Washington, and likely not the last. KPLU's Anna King reports.


WA Gang Taskforce Gets an Earful from Community Members (2008-05-27)
How do you attack the growing gang problem in Washington State? With more money. That's what participants at a recent gang forum in Yakima told members of a statewide taskforce. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


A Year Later: Small Town Gang Ordinance Unused (2008-05-27)
It's been one year since the little town of Sunnyside, Washington enacted a controversial anti-gang ordinance. The law criminalized membership in a gang and gave police the authority to stop kids for wearing gang clothing or colors. Other small Yakima Valley towns soon followed Sunnyside's lead. The ACLU threatened to sue. So what's happened in the year since? The answer might surprise you, as KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Tough Job Market for Teens (2008-05-27)
For adults, getting a job these days is pretty difficult. If you are a teenager, it's next to impossible. KPLU reporter Jennifer Wing explains why.


Food Banks Feeling the Crunch (2008-05-27)
When times get hard, food banks are among the first places to see the impact. As KPLU's Liam Moriarty explains, the same economic pressures that are driving people to seek food help are making it harder to meet that need.


Ocean Acidity Raises the Climate Change Stakes (2008-05-27)
A new climate change threat makes it even more urgent to reduce carbon emissions now. That's the message researchers had for Senator Maria Cantwell at a hearing in Seattle Tuesday. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty was there.


The Meaning of Work: The Final Episode (2008-05-26)
The KPLU series The Meaning of Work began airing last September, on Labor Day. Over the last nine months, people from all walks of life have talked with us about their jobs. Now, with summer on the horizon and vacations in the offing, our series about work life comes to a close. On this, the final installment of The Meaning of Work, KPLU series editor Paula Wissel takes a look back.


Ferry Holiday Travel (2008-05-23)
Travel is expected to be heavy on some of the main state ferry crossings this weekend. But as KPLU's Gary Davis reports, system officials say high gas prices may mean fewer holiday travelers.


Salmon Treaty (2008-05-23)
Canada and Alaska have offered to significantly reduce their catch of salmon migrating home to Oregon and Washington rivers. But a proposed new salmon treaty hinges on Congress approving a multi-million dollar buyout for Alaska and Vancouver Island fishermen.


Gas Prices & Summer Vacation (2008-05-23)
This could be the summer to spend your vacation not too far from home. With air fares up and gas prices through the roof, hotels and resorts in western Washington are hoping you'll stick around. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


Thiel on Mariners' Slide (2008-05-23)
2008 has not started out well for the Seattle Mariners. And it may end up being their worst season ever. That's the opinion of Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel. He talked with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick.


NW Cherry Crop Worries (2008-05-23)
Cool spring weather has put a damper on the Northwest cherry crop this year. Cherry growers suffered more frost damage that previously thought, according to an industry group. KPLU's Chris Lehman has more.


Iraqi Student Solidarity Committee (2008-05-23)
It's been called the cradle of civilization and the birthplace of algebra, modern medicine and astronomy. Yet modern-day Iraq can no longer educate most of its young people. A group in the U.S. called the Iraqi Student Project is trying to help - by securing tuition waivers at colleges and universities here. And it looks like The Evergreen State College in Olympia will be one of the first state schools in the nation to take part. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp has the story.


Memorial Day Weekend Travel Woes (2008-05-23)
This Memorial Day weekend might be a good one to stay home. Northwest travelers face four-dollar-a-gallon gas prices, snowbound campgrounds and raging rivers. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


One Year Later: Small Town Gang Ordinance Unused, Unchallenged (2008-05-22)
It's been one year since the little town of Sunnyside, Washington enacted a controversial anti-gang ordinance. The law criminalized membership in a gang and gave police the authority to stop kids for wearing gang clothing or colors. Other small Yakima Valley towns soon followed Sunnyside's lead. The ACLU threatened to sue. So what's happened in the year since? The answer might surprise you as KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Sound Transit Floats New Proposals (2008-05-22)
After voters rejected last year's massive Roads and Transit ballot measure, Sound Transit spent some months licking its wounds and looking at its options. Now, the agency is taking another stab at crafting a plan to expand light rail, commuter rail and regional bus service in the central Puget Sound area. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Costco - Hold, Buy or Sell? (2008-05-22)
Discount retailers and grocers are usually considered safe-havens in times of economic downturn - their stock goes up when money is tight. But analysts are split on whether Issaquah-based Costco Wholesale is a good stock to hang on to right now. That's the topic of this week's chat with our financial commentator, Greg Heberlein. He spoke with KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Know How 2 Go (2008-05-22)
The competition to get into college in Washington State is getting stiff and educators say low income students are under-represented. KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing tells us about a new advertising campaign that hopes to point these students in the right direction.


Scientist Collects Dust from Hanford (2008-05-22)
A Massachusetts scientist is spending this week standing on Tri-Cities area toilets and peering under refrigerators. An Indian tribe and a Hanford watchdog group hired him to analyze dust. They want to know if lowly dust can tell us whether Mid-Columbia residents have been exposed to radioactive contamination from the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. KPLU's Anna King shadowed the scientist on one of his dust collecting missions.


Court Tosses Out Voter-Approved Hanford Waste Initiative (2008-05-22)
A popular Washington State citizen initiative has been ruled unconstitutional - for the second time. A US Appeals Court says voters can't block the shipment of radioactive and hazardous waste to the Hanford nuclear reservation. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


WSU May Consolidate Course Offerings, Programs (2008-05-21)
Changes may be coming to Washington State University. A report from a 16-member task force is recommending the university consolidate some of its course offerings and programs. Reporter Glenn Mosley has more.


Gas Prices Change Business Practices in NW (2008-05-21)
Call it a "tipping point." Gas has gotten so expensive that companies are changing how they do business - to save on fuel. From realtors to truckers, here in the Northwest the push is on to reduce miles driven and eek out better gas mileage. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Food for Thought: Salt (2008-05-21)
On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson gets salty with KPLU's Dick Stein.


Sound Transit Tests the Water (2008-05-21)
Sound Transit wants to know what you think of a range of options for expanding transit in the central Puget Sound region. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty takes a look at what's on the table.


Alaska Air Pilots Threaten Strike (2008-05-21)
Labor trouble may be on the horizon for Alaska Airlines. More than 300 Alaska Air pilots picketed the carrier's annual shareholders meeting in Seattle yesterday (Tuesday). The unionized pilots are threatening to strike unless the airline improves their pay and benefits. Management says the pilots are making untenable demands, in light of skyrocketing jet fuel prices. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Swollen Rivers Cresting (2008-05-20)
Cooler weather in the forecast starting today (Tuesday) should moderate the rapid mountain snow melt. But rain is also in the forecast. Flood warnings continue on half a dozen northwest rivers. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Northwest Soldiers Return (2008-05-20)
Today (Tuesday) will be a day of homecomings for Northwest soldiers. Two units - an Air Defense Battalion from Fort Lewis and a National Guard Company from Oregon - will be reunited with their families. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Commercial Waste at Hanford Raises Eyebrows (2008-05-20)
Things like radioactive medical waste, "glow in the dark" exit signs from airplanes, and lab waste have to go somewhere after they're used up. Much of that radioactive garbage is trucked through Washington, Oregon and Idaho to the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. There, a little-known commercial waste landfill is getting some attention from Hanford watchdogs. KPLU's Anna King visited the massive sandy trench where that stuff gets dumped and has this report.


Learning from Schoolyard Embarrassment (2008-05-20)
The schoolyard can be a fun place but it can also be home to some acute embarrassments. Slipping and falling in front of a crush. Being the poor kid who never gets to strut the right shoes. Or the gifted kid that everyone else hates. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt visited a late night celebration of these childhood mortifications. She brought us this story.


Heart Disease Study (2008-05-19)
Women living in the central Puget Sound area have one of the healthiest lifestyles in the country. That's according to a new study from the American Heart Association. KPLU's Shirley Skeel has more.


Candidates Make Final Push Before Oregon Primary (2008-05-19)
Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama have made their last campaign stops in Oregon, ahead of tomorrow's (Tuesday's) primary election there. It's been the most hotly-contested presidential primary in the state in many years. Reporter Chris Lehman has a round-up of the final push for votes.


Domestic Violence & Male Victims (2008-05-19)
When it comes to violence in the home, women and children are its most frequent victims. They suffer more brutal abuse, and are more likely to be killed. But men can be victims, too. New research indicates the problem is probably underestimated. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


College Students Reconsider Summer Travel (2008-05-19)
It's that time of year - college students are packing up dorm rooms, walking in graduation and many are making summer travel plans. But this year - in a slumping economy - a summer backpacking tour of Europe seems out of reach. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


Greek Orthodox Nuns in Washington Mountains (2008-05-19)
Did you know there's a place in Washington State where people only speak Greek, eat Greek food and pray all day for the salvation of the world? In the pine-dotted mountains just north of Goldendale in south central Washington, 18 women live in a different time. It's called St. John The Forerunner Greek Orthodox Monastery. KPLU's Anna King lived in the monastery for two days, to bring us this story.


The Meaning of Work: Bread For Success (2008-05-19)
It's said bread is the 'staff of life'. For one Seattle baker, that's certainly true. On today's "Meaning of Work," KPLU's Gary Davis introduces us to a bread maker who feeds the soul of a community.


Sunny Weather a Problem For NW Rivers and Mountains (2008-05-16)
If the sunny weather has you planning to play near rivers or up in the mountains this weekend, take heed. Fast melting snow is expected to create dangerous conditions. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Online Purchasers in WA To Pay Sales Tax More Often (2008-05-16)
One of the attractions for Washington residents to shop from catalogs or online, is the frequent absence of sales tax. That's starting to change. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Governor Talks Frankly with WEA Members (2008-05-16)
Teachers from across Washington are in Spokane this week for an annual meeting of the Washington Education Association. Governor Christine Gregoire addressed the crowd gathered at the Spokane Convention Center last night (Thursday). But, as Amanda Loder reports, an unprecedented smaller gathering preceded the big event.


Thiel on Griffey Possibly Coming Back to Seattle (2008-05-16)
The Mariners are looking at possibly bringing Ken Griffey Junior back to Seattle. Many fans have fond memories of Griffey's time here and may be ready to embrace his return. But Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick he isn't so sure it's a good idea.


Farm Bill Includes Salmon Disaster Aid (2008-05-16)
All six Northwest Senators voted in favor of the compromise Farm Bill when Congress sent the package to the president yesterday (Thursday). The measure includes 170 million dollars in cash assistance for coastal salmon fishing communities. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Washington Home Sales Slump (2008-05-16)
The home sales slump continues in Washington state. Glenn Mosley has more.


Mercy Corps Earthquake Relief in China (2008-05-16)
The devastating earthquake in China has one Northwest aid group looking beyond the immediate need for food and water. A Seattle-based worker for Mercy Corps spoke with KPLU's Liam Moriarty from the provincial capital Chengdu about efforts to help stricken families get back on their feet.


Sunny Weather a Problem For NW Rivers and Mountains (2008-05-16)
If the sunny weather has you planning to play near rivers or up in the mountains this weekend, take heed. Fast melting snow is expected to create dangerous conditions. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Carbon Experiment Meets Opposition (2008-05-15)
An experiment to demonstrate whether a global warming gas could be captured and locked up forever deep underground in the mid-Columbia is catching flak from an unexpected quarter. Critics include people who want something done about climate change. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Credit Card Debt at Record High (2008-05-15)
Credit card debt has reached an all-time high in the United States. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein tells KPLU's Dave Meyer it might trigger another financial crisis.


New Rules Would Require "Green" Taxis (2008-05-15)
New taxi cabs would have to get at least 30 miles per gallon, under a proposed rule intended to green-up Seattle's fleet. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Nader Visits Northwest (2008-05-14)
We hear a lot about John McCain, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. But they aren't the only presidential hopefuls who've made their way to the Northwest. Ralph Nader will speak at the University of Washington tonight. He was in Tacoma earlier. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports on his bid as an Independent candidate.


Cruise Traffic to Alaska Low (2008-05-14)
A hundred-and-twenty years ago, prospectors departed Seattle for the goldfields of Alaska. Now, it's tourists who depart, in search of wildlife, scenery and Alaska Native culture. Luxury cruise ships will leave Seattle for Alaska about 200 times this season. CoastAlaska's Ed Schoenfeld reports on an industry that continues Puget Sound's role as a gateway to the Last Frontier.


Not Enough Ships to Send NW Products Overseas (2008-05-14)
Business is booming for Northwest exporters. That's because of the weakened US dollar. But now, companies that need to get their products overseas are running into a problem. There aren't enough ships to take the goods. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


NW Aid Groups Challenged by Simultaneous Disasters (2008-05-14)
The quartet of international aid organizations based in the Northwest say they can respond to two major disasters simultaneously. As it happens, China is proving more welcoming of outside assistance for earthquake victims than the government of Myanmar is for cyclone survivors. KPLU's Tom Banse has more on the story.


Northwest Hay Shortage Worsened by Late Crop (2008-05-14)
Many Pacific Northwest hay farmers this week are gearing up for their first cutting of alfalfa for the season. But it's going to be a skimpy one because of the cool spring weather. As KPLU's Anna King reports, the light crop isn't helping the region's hay shortage.


Food for Thought: Splendid Table Cookbook (2008-05-14)
On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Time food writer Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein about her new favorite cookbook.


McCain Touts His Environmental Program (2008-05-14)
Republican presidential candidate John McCain is showcasing his green agenda on the campaign trail this week. The senator visited the Seattle area to speak at a roundtable of elected officials, business leaders and conservationists. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty was there.


Cruise Traffic to Alaska Low (2008-05-14)
A hundred-and-twenty years ago, prospectors departed Seattle for the goldfields of Alaska. Now, it's tourists who depart, in search of wildlife, scenery and Alaska Native culture. Luxury cruise ships will leave Seattle for Alaska about 200 times this season. CoastAlaska's Ed Schoenfeld reports on an industry that continues Puget Sound's role as a gateway to the Last Frontier.


NW Police Feel Pain at the Pump (2008-05-13)
Record high gas prices aren't just hurting commuters and businesses. Northwest police agencies say they too are feeling the pain at the pump. The cost of fuel is busting budgets. The situation is so dire in one rural county in Washington that sheriff's deputies may soon have to park their cars. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Cost of Fuel Hurts NW Sheriffs (2008-05-13)
If you're feeling pain at the gas pumps, you're not alone. Some Northwest police agencies say the high cost of fuel is busting their budgets. The situation is so serious that one rural Sheriff says his deputies may have to park their cars. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Drop, Cover and Hold? (2008-05-13)
If you're in China, running out of a building when an earthquake strikes may make sense. But emergency officials say that's the last thing you should do if a similar disaster hits here. KPLU's Paula Wissel explains.


Head Winds Buffet Some Wind Projects (2008-05-13)
The Skamania County prosecutor is asking a judge to throw a wind farm challenge out of court. Earlier, a citizens group filed suit against the county to stop a proposed wind farm near the Columbia Gorge. This is the third wind project to run into opposition in the Northwest, despite public votes in favor of more renewable energy. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Clinton Rallies Support for Clinton in Oregon (2008-05-13)
A week from today, the Northwest will be in the spotlight in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, when Oregon holds its primary. Today in Oregon, former President Bill Clinton is spending a third day campaigning for his wife in the Southwest part of the state. Reporter Chris Lehman has more on Clinton's visit to the Oregon coast yesterday.


McCain Defends Boeing Tanker Stand (2008-05-13)
Republican presidential candidate John McCain is defending himself against union members who accuse him of helping kill Boeing's shot at a lucrative Pentagon tanker contract. McCain is campaigning in the Seattle area today. KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports


Winter Takes Heavy Toll on Elk Herd (2008-05-12)
Last winter's harsh weather killed a record number of animals in Washington's largest elk herd, despite an emergency feeding program. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Has the Weather Gone Haywire? (2008-05-12)
The weather forecast for later this week calls for temperatures around 85 degrees. In mid-May? What's that about? KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty asks the local experts.


Last Mill in Coeur d'Alene Saws Final Log (2008-05-12)
Dozens of saw mills are being idled around the Northwest because of plummeting demand for lumber. No surprise that the national slump in the housing market gets the blame. The latest casualties include Stimson Lumber Company's Couer d'Alene, Idaho mill. It expects to process its final log today (Monday). This mill's days were numbered anyway because of the transformation of the town it's in. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on the "end of an era" in Coeur d'Alene.


Seattle, Bellingham, and Olympia "Recession-Proof" (2008-05-12)
Here's some good news for those worried about the economy. Seattle, Bellingham, and Olympia appear on national lists of recession-proof cities. KPLU's Tom Banse explains.


Washington Holds Mental Health Summit (2008-05-12)
Washington State has embarked on a five year effort to transform the way mentally ill people are diagnosed and treated. The idea is to bring a public health approach to mental health - that means a focus on prevention. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Mentally Ill Children Face Long Wait for Treatment (2008-05-12)
Imagine having a young child who beats you up - physically, violently. A child who doesn't just throw the occasional temper tantrum, but rages out-of-control daily. This has been Janet Friedberg's agony for the past seven years. Now the suburban Seattle mother of three is speaking out - about the lack of services available to families like hers. Including the long wait to get her child into "in-patient psychiatric care". KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this special, in-depth report.


Meaning of Work: Mom the Manager (2008-05-12)
For our next Meaning of Work - here's one for you - a job where you supervise several other people, have no office and never ending hours. Oh and you don't get paid. That job -- a stay-at home mom. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes us to Medina to experience a typical morning with mother Mary Alhadeff.


Boeing Contract Talks Begin (2008-05-09)
Boeing continues to do well - despite the flagging economy. And both labor and management are optimistic that their negotiations will go well this year -- as they sit down for the first round of contract talks tomorrow (Friday 5/09/08). More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Boeing and Machinists Negotiating (2008-05-09)
Boeing the Machinists Union sit down later today (Friday at 3pm) to have a first round of negotiations. The contract covering 25-thousand aerospace workers who assemble commercial airplanes expires in September. And both sides want to avoid a costly strike like the one in 2005 that lasted nearly a month. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Mompreneurs Gathering at Microsoft (2008-05-09)
Women CAN have it all. And stay-at-home moms aren't necessarily only caring for kids. That was the mother's day message delivered at a conference on Microsoft's campus targeting so-called Momprenuers. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp


Iraqi Interpreter in US Longs to Return (2008-05-09)
At least 9 thousand Iraqis have signed up to work as interpreters for U-S troops in Iraq. It's a dangerous job -- interpreters are special targets of insurgents who see them as traitors. This year the US is granting special immigrant visas to 500 Afghan and Iraqi interpreters. They come with their families to live here in safety. But as KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports - their story doesn't always end there happily ever after. This warning - this story contains some graphic images:


Iraqi Interpreter in US Longs to Return (2008-05-09)
Tens of thousands of Iraqis have signed up to work as interpreters for US troops in Iraq. It's a dangerous job - interpreters are special targets of insurgents who see them as traitors. This year the US is granting special immigrant visas to 500 Afghan and Iraqi interpreters. They come with their families to live here in safety. But as KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports - their story doesn't always end there, happily ever after. Warning - this story contains some graphic images.


Feds Unveil Environmental Review for Makah Whale Hunt (2008-05-09)
The Makah Indian tribes' effort to resume hunting whale has taken a step forward. Federal fisheries managers have released a long-awaited environmental review. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Thiel on Seahawks' Bobby Engram (2008-05-09)
It's baseball season, but pro football has grabbed sports headlines of late. Seattle Seahawks receiver Bobby Engram wants more money, and he's decided to sit out this week's voluntary training camp. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel tells KPLU's Gary Davis why the star has a point.


Senator Clinton in Oregon (2008-05-09)
Hillary Clinton returned to Oregon last night with a stop at the fairgrounds in Central Point, outside of Medford. The senator from New York made it clear she plans to stick with her campaign at least through Oregon's primary on May 20th. Jessica Robinson has more.


Courting Rural Votes (2008-05-08)
Democrats Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama's campaigns are coming back to the Northwest. Oregon will vote on May 20th. Clinton will campaign in Southern Oregon tonight. Obama arrives tomorrow. In recent primaries, Clinton has fared well with rural voters. Her campaign is going after those same voters in Oregon. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Wild Sky Wilderness Signed into Law (2008-05-08)
It took years of partisan wrangling in Congress, but Washington State finally has its first new wilderness area in nearly 25 years. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


NW Cities Join Aint-Water Bottle Movement (2008-05-08)
More cities around the country are joining the movement against bottled water. Seattle yesterday became the latest Northwest city to urge its residents to tap into tap water. Chris Lehman reports.


Don't Buy That House! (2008-05-08)
Interest rates for 30-year-mortgages are hovering around 6 percent and real estate prices are lower than they were a year ago. Is this a good time to buy a house? Financial commentator Greg Heberlein tells KPLU's Dave Meyer it's a good idea to wait for prices to drop even lower.


Property Tax Forum Hits the Road (2008-05-08)
Majority Democrats in the Washington legislature did not tackle property tax reform this year, despite promises to do so. Now they're hitting the road for a series of election year property tax forums. The first one is today in the Tri-Cities. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this preview.


Food for Thought: Do It Yourself Designer Water (2008-05-07)
Want the taste and feel of fancy imported sparkling water at a fraction of the price? KPLU's Dick Stein shares his secret recipe with Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson on today's Food for Thought.


Auto Theft Drops In WA State (2008-05-07)
Fewer people got their cars stolen in Washington State last year. New crime statistics show auto theft dropped 18-percent in 2007. Police credit aggressive crackdowns and tougher sentences for a crime that didn't used to get a lot of attention. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Group Health Coop Ranks High (2008-05-07)
Group Health Cooperative is apparently well-loved by those who use it for their care. A national survey ranked it highest for member satisfaction in the Northwest - and second highest in the nation. Premera Blue Cross and Regence Blue Shield of Washington also came in above average. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Sea Lions Not Shot to Death (2008-05-07)
What at first seemed a brutal act of animal cruelty has instead turned into a scientific mystery. Examinations of the six sea lions found dead in cages on the Columbia River show they were not shot to death after all. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Housing Slump May Aid Growers (2008-05-07)
The housing slump is bad news for builders, but not for Northwest fruit growers. One of the world's largest fruit companies reported a record turn out at its job fair recently. KPLU's Anna King has the story.


Latest Recovery Plan for NW Salmon (2008-05-06)
The Bush Administration is making its third try at convincing a federal judge that Northwest dams and irrigation programs can be made compatible with endangered salmon. The jury is out on whether the latest plan will pass muster. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Attorney General Race Heats Up (2008-05-06)
The State Attorney General's race is heating up. Pierce County Executive John Ladenburg announced yesterday that he will run against incumbent Rob McKenna. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Lost Grant (2008-05-06)
A 13-million dollar grant that would have gone to a handful of public high schools across Washington state has fallen through. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing explains why the money won't be spent here.


New Effort to Monitor Prostate Cancer (2008-05-06)
For men diagnosed with prostate cancer the best course of action may be no treatment at all. KPLU health & science reporter Gary Davis tells us researchers hope to find a better way to monitor the deadly disease.


King County Approves Eastside Rail/Trail Deal (2008-05-06)
Advocates of a new Eastside commuter rail line and those pushing for more bike trails find themselves in a somewhat uneasy alliance. That's because 26 miles of unused railroad track from Renton to Woodinville are now a big step closer to being made into a corridor for shared public use. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains.


Holocaust Teacher (2008-05-05)
A Tacoma high school teacher has won a national prize for teaching students history in a way they won't easily forget. KPLU's Shirley Skeel has the story.


Insanity Defense (2008-05-05)
The trial continues this week for the man accused of killing a woman and wounding five others at the Jewish Federation in Seattle. His attorneys argue that Naveed Haq should be found "not guilty by reason of insanity." They point to his erratic behavior and his statement that God had sanctioned the attack. But Seattle University criminal law professor David Boerner says an insanity defense is a difficult thing to prove in Washington state. He talked with KPLU's Paula Wissel.


Meaning of Work: Mariner Music Man (2008-05-05)
Have you ever been at a Mariners game and wondered who decides what music to play and when? KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick has found the answer in this week's installment of our series The Meaning of Work.


Washington Forests and Carbon Trading (2008-05-05)
Washington's new climate change laws are leading the state toward a carbon trading system. An advisory panel in Olympia has just started figuring out how the state's forests would fit into such a scheme. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains.


Holocaust Teacher (2008-05-05)
A Tacoma high school teacher has won a national prize for teaching students history in a way they won't easily forget. KPLU's Shirley Skeel has the story.


Salmon Disaster (2008-05-02)
The federal government has officially declared this year's West Coast salmon fishery to be an economic disaster. That clears a path for states to seek cash relief from Congress for coastal fishing communities. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Thiel on Mariners' First Month of 2008 (2008-05-02)
The Mariners are in New York for a three-game series with the Yankees (Friday through Sunday). After one month of play in the 2008 season, Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick things aren't looking good for the M's. He joined her by phone this week.


May Day Brings Marches, Rallies to Northwest (2008-05-02)
Today (Thursday) is May Day, and it was greeted with marches and rallies across the Northwest. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Protesters March for Immigration Reform (2008-05-02)
As the sun began to set last night, a long line of marchers made its way through downtown Seattle. Protesters in the annual May Day march were demanding changes to immigration law. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt was there.


Project Helps Farmers Fight Global Warming (2008-05-02)
Agriculture is a big contributor to global warming. It uses lots of fossil fuels for running machinery, transporting goods and manufacturing fertilizers and pesticides. Now, a project at Washington State University is finding ways farmers can cut their greenhouse gases. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Dock Workers March (2008-05-02)
Ports all along the West Coast were shut down yesterday as thousands of longshore workers rallied for peace. In Seattle, several hundred activists marched up Alaskan Way to protest the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. KPLU's Shirley Skeel was there.


NW Reaction to Guns in Parks (2008-05-01)
Strong reactions are coming in toward new rules for guns in national parks. The Department of the Interior wants to partially lift its ban on bringing loaded weapons into parks and wildlife refuges. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


A Portrait of the State Supreme Court (2008-05-01)
This year, three of Washington State's nine Supreme Court Justices are up for re-election. These campaigns will likely be overshadowed by the governor's race and the presidential race. But there's a lot at stake in these judicial contests as well. The high court routinely rules on cases dealing with property rights, civil rights, open government, and criminal matters. To get a pulse of the current court, KPLU's Austin Jenkins recently interviewed several court-watchers.


Mine Near Mt. St. Helens Rejected (2008-05-01)
The federal government has rejected an application for a controversial copper mine close to Mt. St. Helens. In response, the developer says it's shelving its plans. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Real Estate Commentary: Time to Buy? (2008-05-01)
It this the time to get a great deal on a house, now that more and more are being auctioned off? And is there anything to those celebrity "wheeler dealers" in late-night info-commercials who say there's big money to be made in real estate? With more on that, KPLU's John Maynard talks with Richard Hagar, and educator and appraiser based in Seattle.


Immigrants March for Workers' Rights (2008-05-01)
Rallies are planned today across Western Washington in support of immigrants' rights. The largest one will be in Seattle. It will follow at least two other downtown Seattle May Day marches. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has more.


Smaller NW Cities Feel Airline Cutbacks (2008-05-01)
You know that pain in your wallet every time you fill up your gas tank? Airlines are feeling the pinch of high fuel prices too. And that's leading to cutbacks in air service to midsize Northwest comunities. Reporter Chris Lehman has more.


Longshore Workers Plan War Protest (2008-04-30)
Longshore workers will protest in Seattle and other major West Coast ports tomorrow (Thursday). They're calling for an end to the Iraq War. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Congress Approves New Wilderness & Monument (2008-04-30)
Congress has approved the first new wilderness area in Washington State in more than twenty years. The US House has sent a measure to President Bush that includes a number of other items of Northwest interest, too. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Northwest Cherries Hit Hard By Spring Frost (2008-04-30)
Spring frosts have wiped out millions of pounds of Northwest cherries. Washington Agriculture Director Valoria Loveland and other state officials plan to tour the east side of the state today (Wednesday) to get a handle on the damage. It's more spotty than widespread. KPLU's Anna King has more.


Food for Thought: Familiar Places (2008-04-30)
While our first visit to a new restaurant can be exciting, we reserve a special affection for the old familiar places we've been patronizing for years - as Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Separate Housing Market for Houseboats (2008-04-30)
Seattle is one of precious few cities that have mostly managed to escape the nationwide housing slump...that is, so far. But there is one small, unique housing market that is almost guaranteed to be safe: houseboats. Seattle's most famous houseboat has just gone on the market. And as KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports, it is likely to be the most expensive floating home sale ever.


Plea Deal Reached in Thirtymile Fire Deaths (2008-04-30)
Manslaughter charges have been dropped under a plea deal between the federal government and a former fire crew boss. Ellreese Daniels has pleaded guilty to lesser charges in connection with a wildfire that killed four of his crewmembers in "a canyon of north-central Washington" back in 2001. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on the case watched closely by forest firefighters around the country.


Irregular Heartbeat Linked to Osteoporosis Drug Fosamax (2008-04-29)
A drug commonly prescribed to treat osteoporosis may greatly increase a patient's risk of developing an irregular heartbeat. The link to Fosamax was discovered in a study of hundreds of women treated by Group Health. KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis explains.


NW Biodiesel Squeezed by High Prices (2008-04-29)
Gasoline and diesel prices have hit new record highs in Washington. You'd think that might drive consumers to alternative fuel. But in the case of biodiesel, prices at the pump are rising as fast as for regular fuel. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


WASL in a Foreign Language (2008-04-29)
It will be at least another month before high school students find out how they did on the state WASL exam. The subjects on the WASL that students have the hardest time with are math and science. Now, imagine how difficult it is for kids who don't speak English. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing tells us the state wants to level the playing field for these young men and women. However, some educators aren't so sure the plan will work.


Budget Woes on the Horizon (2008-04-29)
Legislative budget writers are pessimistic about Washington State's fiscal outlook for next year. That's according to a new 50-state survey. Their peers in Oregon and Idaho place themselves in the "concerned" category. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains what this means.


New Math Standards (2008-04-28)
Elementary and middle school students should get ready to dig deeper into their math text books. KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing explains why.


Rights of the Disabled - A Talk With Dick Thornburgh (2008-04-28)
The United Nations' Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities takes effect. Its aim is to affirm the basic dignity of the disabled, and provide a legal framework for their full integration into society. But the United States hasn't signed it. KPLU's Gary Davis recently sat down with former U.S. Attorney General Dick Thornburgh, who fought for the 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act.


The Meaning of Work: The Baby Room (2008-04-28)
It's a job where people crawl all over you. And everybody around you seems to need something right now. On today's Meaning of Work we meet a woman who spends her days inside the baby room of a Redmond child care center. KPLU's Paula Wissel takes us there.


Schools Communicate with Direct Voicemail (2008-04-28)
Police are investigating a death threat Everett's school superintendent received last week. The threat is described as serious but the district was able to ease parents nerves with a message delivered right to their voicemail boxes. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt explains.


Native Myths Incorporated into Earthquake Preparedness (2008-04-28)
Government seismologists have raised their estimate for how much the West Coast will shake when the Big One hits. The scientists agree there's a higher probability the offshore Cascadia earthquake zone will rupture unleashing a massive - magnitude nine - earthquake. Scientists and emergency planners at a national also pondered legends gathered from coastal Indian tribes. KPLU's Tom Banse reports how Native storytelling is being incorporated into earthquake and tsunami preparedness.


Controversy Continues Over WA Heat Stroke Rule (2008-04-28)
It's still a bit chilly outside, but the State is looking ahead to the dog days of summer. The Department of Labor and Industries will hold public hearings this week (week of April 28th) on controversial new regulations to protect people who work outside from heat stress. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Tacoma Chooses New Superintendent (2008-04-25)
After several months of interviews Tacoma has chosen a new school superintendent. The district did a nationwide search, board members flew to candidates home districts across the country. But in the end Tacoma ended up choosing someone close to home. KPLU Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


Thiel on Shaun Alexander Leaving Seahawks (2008-04-25)
As expected, the Seahawks released running back Shaun Alexander this week. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick it was time for Alexander to go but he also says it's time for fans to start looking at Alexander's entire career in Seattle, and not just his final two injury-plagued seasons.


Sea Lion Roundup Starts on Columbia River (2008-04-25)
Three sea lions have snacked on endangered salmon in the Columbia River for the last time. They were captured yesterday (Thursday) and are now destined to live out their days at Sea World. State wildlife agents will return to the river next week to trap and relocate more hungry sea lions. Killing them is not allowed, for now. KPLU's Tom Banse has more on the start of a roundup.


Settlement on Record Fine for Hanford Tank Waste Spill (2008-04-25)
A deal has been struck over a record fine for a radioactive waste spill at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The spill happened during a night-time pumping operation last summer. Yesterday (Thursday), the State Department of Ecology announced a settlement that involves half-a-million dollars in penalties for the accident. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Cow Manure Energy Plant Gets a Boost (2008-04-24)
Puget Sound Energy has just signed onto a plan by a pair of young entrepreneurs in Mount Vernon who hope to turn cow manure into green power. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


The CarryAlong PC (2008-04-24)
Small computers are about to make a big splash in the marketplace. Strategic News Service publisher Mark Anderson says they're about the size of a book and almost as powerful as desktop PCs. He spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer from his office in the San Juan Islands.


Getting Westerners to Care About AIDS (2008-04-24)
Several big Northwest institutions, including the Gates Foundation and World Vision, are working to relieve the AIDS epidemic in Africa. World Vision is trying to dramatize the issue by taking a portable African village on tour in Washington, Oregon, and California. The exhibit designers confront the question of how to get everyday Northwesterners to care about AIDS in Africa. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from Tacoma.


Sea Lion Capture On, But Killing Verboten (2008-04-24)
A federal appeals court has forbidden Washington and Oregon from killing any of the troublesome sea lions in the Columbia River this season. The states did receiver permission to put some sea lions into permanent captivity. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Oregon Still Important Democratic Battleground (2008-04-24)
Hilary Clinton's 10-point victory in the Pennsylvania primary this week keeps things more or less the same in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. And it means that Oregon's May 20th primary continues to shape up as one of the last important primary battlegrounds. Reporter Chris Lehman has more from Salem.


WA Dairy Sued for Air Pollution (2008-04-24)
Environmentalists have filed suit against one of the Northwest's largest dairy cow operations. But this lawsuit comes with a twist. At issue is air pollution from the dairy, not waste getting into nearby streams. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Tick Season is Here (2008-04-24)
Warm weather means dogs playing in the woods and people playing on mountain trails. And all that can mean ticks! KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


Local Iraqis Continue to Support War (2008-04-24)
When the war in Iraq started, Iraqi exiles in Everett paraded in the streets. Five years later, polls show most Americans oppose the war. But support is still strong among those who lived under Saddam Hussein. KPLU's Austin Jenkins recently returned to Everett, and filed this reporter's notebook.


Canadians Plan to Recover Sunken Fuel Trucks (2008-04-23)
Canadian officials will try to recover at least some of the heavy equipment that slid off a barge last summer, causing a fuel spill in an ecological reserve in British Columbia. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Washington Agriculture Director Valoria Loveland to Retire (2008-04-23)
Valoria Loveland, the State's director of Agriculture, has announced that she will retire on May 5th. The short-statured, but influential director frequently talked up her roots as an Eastern Washington farm girl. KPLU's Anna King talked to growers in the state about her departure.


Harbors, Politicians Jockey to Homeport NOAA Fleet (2008-04-23)
The federal government's marine research arm is considering alternative homeports for its Pacific fleet. Four vessels are currently stationed in Seattle. Harbors and politicians from Bellingham to Newport, Oregon have begun jockeying for the business. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Don't Trash Compact Flourescents (2008-04-23)
Sometimes solving one problem creates another. Such is the case with compact fluorescent light bulbs. They last longer and burn less energy, but they also contain mercury. Now the "push is on" to get consumers to recycle the curly bulbs. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Food for Thought: Donuts (2008-04-23)
They're round, they're firm, they're full of fat - and soooo good. On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein muse on the virtues of America's favorite deep-fried circular pastry.


Sound Transit Struggling With Next Move (2008-04-23)
Since the defeat of the Proposition 1 "Roads and Transit" ballot measure last fall, Sound Transit has been struggling to figure out its next move. At least one board member seems confident the transit agency will move forward this week with proposals for extending light rail and boosting existing bus and train service. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Enviros Push for Transit Vote in November (2008-04-22)
Sound Transit is still licking its wounds from the stinging defeat of the Prop 1 Roads and Transit ballot measure last fall. Now, environmental groups are urging the agency to put a transit-only measure before voters this November. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story


NPR'S PENNSYLVANIA PRIMARY SPECIAL (2008-04-22)
KPLU and NPR will provide coverage of the Pennsylvania primary on Tuesday, April 22nd from 5pm-7pm. Robert Siegel and Melissa block will host the special which will cover the results from Pennsylvania and will look ahead to the primaries in North Carolina and Indiana. Click here to listen starting at 5pm.


Earth Day 2008: Green Hype (2008-04-22)
It's Earth Day, and KPLU's environment reporter Liam Moriarty is digging out from under an avalanche of press releases. Dozens of businesses across the country want him to do an Earth Day story about their product or service that's saving the planet. Liam sat down with Robert McClure - environment reporter at the Seattle P-I - to compare their favorite examples of Earth Day marketing hype.


Worldwide Hop Shortage Spurs Boom in Yakima Valley (2008-04-22)
A worldwide hop shortage has spurred higher prices for the small cones that flavor beer. The shortage has fostered an explosion of new hop acres in The Yakima Valley. KPLU's Anna King visited the back rooms of breweries and the dusty hop fields of Eastern Washington to bring us this report.


Teacher Opposes the WASL (2008-04-22)
A Seattle middle school teacher is taking a stand against the WASL exam and is paying a price for it. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing tells us he's being disciplined by the school district for refusing to administer the controversial test.


It's Not Just Earth Day Anymore (2008-04-22)
Today is Earth Day (Tuesday). But many companies and institutions are celebrating something called Earth WEEK. When did the event morph? We asked KPLU's Anna King to track down a little history.


The Meaning of Work: Weyerhaeuser Executive Steve Rogel (2008-04-21)
What if your base salary was a million dollars with a possible bonus of several million more? That's the case for many corporate executives. Today on The Meaning of Work, KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp introduces us to one of them.


Teacher Refuses to Give WASL (2008-04-21)
The Seattle School District is disciplining a teacher for refusing to give his sixth grade students the WASL exam. The teacher at Eckstein Middle school in Northeast Seattle, says the state WASL is harmful to students, teachers and families.KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing has more


Man-made Waterfall May Help Fish (2008-04-21)
Dams and baby salmon don't mix. The fish get killed by turbines or can't find their way past. But now an Eastern Washington utility district has found a solution. They've built a man-made waterfall on the Columbia River to slip fish past the dam, and further on their way to sea. KPLU's Anna King explains.


Airline Wars (2008-04-21)
Airline passengers are having a terrible year with flights being canceled and scares over safety. But here on the West Coast there's one bright spot. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


Life Expectancy Study Shows Declines (2008-04-21)
There's a disturbing trend when it comes to life expectancy. In some areas of the US people aren't living as long. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


WA Tobacco Settlement Goes to Life Sciences Research (2008-04-21)
Remember when the states sued the tobacco companies and won nearly 250 billion dollars over 25 years? Much of that money has gone to reduce smoking rates. But now Washington State is using some of the settlement dollars for scientific research. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Sonics Move to Oklahoma OK'd (2008-04-18)
The Seattle Sonics can move to Oklahoma City. Team owners got the O-K from the National Basketball Association to relocate. But as KPLU's Gary Davis explains, it all hinges on the courts.


Thiel on Legal Volleys in Sonics Deal (2008-04-18)
The NBA Board of Governors is expected to vote later today to authorize the relocation of the Sonics from Seattle to Oklahoma City. The NBA's action will end a week of angry words and legal maneuvers in the case. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel talked with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick about everything that's transpired. Art was out of town this week, and joined Kirsten by phone.


State Gas Prices Up, Consumption Down (2008-04-18)
Two new studies are shedding some light on how Washington's high gas prices are affecting consumers. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Enviros Strike Deal Over Gold Mine (2008-04-18)
Here's a follow up to a story we brought you last fall. Environmentalists have struck a deal with a Canadian company over a controversial gold mine in North Central Washington State. The agreement means the mine can open, but with additional protections in place. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


E-Waste Event Questioned (2008-04-18)
With Earth Day coming up, it seems every business in the world wants to show off its environmental credentials. But a Vancouver, B.C. junk-hauling company is finding out that sometimes, it's not so easy to be green. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains.


New Map to Track Money in Governor's Race (2008-04-18)
The governor's race is already on track to be the most expensive in state history. Now, there's a new way to track the money flowing to the candidates. The Public Disclosure Commission has launched an on-line map. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains how it works.


Local Food, Local Decisions (2008-04-17)
The way we produce and distribute our food impacts our wallets, our health, our communities, our planet. The Seattle City Council is considering a far-reaching initiative that could re-shape how we in Western Washington interact with our food. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


WaMu Meeting (2008-04-17)
When Washington Mutual shareholders met this week in Seattle, C-E-O Kerry Killinger asked them to show a little faith. Instead, he saw a lot of anger. The nation's largest thrift lost three billion dollars in the past six months, and is expected to lose billions more in the near future. KPLU's Dave Meyer spoke with financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


A New Generation of Homeless Vets (2008-04-17)
More help is on the way for homeless veterans, including those just back from Iraq and Afghanistan. Next month, the federal government will disperse $75-million to public housing agencies across the country. The money will pay for rental vouchers. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Judge Refuses to Block Sea Lion Killing (2008-04-17)
There will be no reprive for salmon-eating lions on the Columbia River. A federal judge in Oregon has declined to block state officials from killing the protected sea mammals. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


WASL Only One of Life's Tests (2008-04-17)
Students across the state are hunching over their desks this week, rubbing their foreheads and grinding down number 2 pencils. It is WASL time - the Washington Assessment of Student Learning. We adults feel for the kids who have to sit through hours of multiple choice. But as KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt found testing is not limited to kids in a classroom:


Dalai Lama, Tutu Discuss Compassion and Spirituality (2008-04-16)
Two of the world's most renowned spiritual leaders closed out the Seeds of Compassion conference. The exiled leader of Tibet, the Dalai Lama, and South African Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu spoke at an interfaith forum in Seattle yesterday. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Financial Literacy Required for Low-Income Aid (2008-04-16)
Here's something that may surprise you: financial industry research finds that one in seven American money-earners don't have a bank account of any kind. Local agencies that serve the poor are paying more attention to personal money management - and mismanagement. They're starting to require that some clients take financial literacy classes in order to receive other services. KPLU's Tom Banse has more from Tacoma.


Food for Thought: Hoarded Food (2008-04-16)
It's good to be prepared with reserve supplies of food but sometimes you can be a little too prepared - or even a lot too prepared - as Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Washington to Start Using Traffic Cameras on Highways (2008-04-16)
Next time you drive through a highway construction zone - check your speedometer. Washington State is starting to use traffic cameras near construction zones to nab speeders. KPLU's Anna King has more.


Seattle Considers Local Food Initiative (2008-04-16)
How our food is grown, where it comes from and how it gets to our plate are among the issues the Seattle City Council is currently chewing over. It's part of an ambitious initiative that could affect everyone around the region who eats. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story


Rossi Rolls-Out Transportation Plan (2008-04-16)
Washington State gubernatorial candidate Dino Rossi has rolled-out his plan for fixing Washington roads. Rossi, a Republican, wants to spend 15-billion dollars to reduce congestion and encourage people to buy hybrid cars. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Transportation Looms Large in Governors Race (2008-04-16)
Transportation could be the top issue in the 2008 governor's race. Republican candidate Dino Rossi has rolled out a 15-billion dollar plan to reduce congestion and encourage hybrid ownership. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


The Green Office: Breaking Open the Box (2008-04-16)
A Seattle architecture firm is moving into what they say is the city's first major office building in decades to be constructed without air conditioning. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Duncan Trial (2008-04-15)
Jury selection began Monday in Bosie for a federal hearing to determine whether Joseph Edward Duncan should be executed. He kidnapped a boy and a girl in 2005 from their home near Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, molested them for weeks and killed the boy. He pleaded guilty. Now a jury will decide whether he should be sentenced to life in prison or death. Bosie State Radio's Don Wimberly has more.


Dalai Lama & Desmond Tutu in Seattle (2008-04-15)
The Dalai Lama is wrapping up his five day visit to Seattle this afternoon (Tuesday) at a forum on inspiring compassion in young people. The exiled spiritual and political leader of Tibet was joined by South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu. KPLU's Gary Davis was there, and has our report.


Law Keeping Ill Out of Jail Isn't Working (2008-04-15)
A new law to keep mentally ill people out of jail in Washington State isn't working. That's according to a survey of counties and cities. Officials say the law is a good idea, but there are too many barriers to implementing it. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Beachside Homeowners Clash with Sea Farmers (2008-04-15)
An unusual land-use fight is festering in Southern Puget Sound. Beachside homeowners are clashing with geoduck farmers. Geoducks are giant clams that fetch more than a hundred dollars a plate in overseas restaurants. Opponents complain the farms are an eyesore that foul the beach. Farmers counter that geoducks are good for the health of Puget Sound. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Hanford Watchdogs Call for Change in Cleanup Management (2008-04-15)
A federal watchdog group wants to fire the Department of Energy from its job of cleaning up the contaminated Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The "Heart of America Northwest" made the announcement at the nation's capital. KPLU's Anna King has more.


Back to Basics with a High Tech Twist (2008-04-15)
Many of us work in office buildings with sealed windows and sophisticated systems for lighting, heating and cooling. Now, a Seattle architecture firm is trying something radical - letting in natural light and fresh air. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Shaky Economy Depresses Horse Industry (2008-04-14)
Here's a story about the souring economy through the eyes of horse traders. With commodity prices up, it's more expensive to keep a horse. It's harder to sell them too, with the recent shuttering of the last horse slaughter houses in the United States. KPLU's Anna King visited a horse auction in Enumclaw and has this report.


Local Tibetans Listen for Dalai Lama's Teachings (2008-04-14)
As the Dalai Lama continues his visit in Seattle, the exiled spiritual leader of Tibet has made some political statements on recent Tibetan protests and unrest. No one is listening more carefully than Seattle's local Tibetan community. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Seattle Hotels Look at Ways To Go Green (2008-04-14)
Business people across the spectrum are looking to make their operations more earth-friendly. At a symposium this week, hotel managers in Seattle will get a look at a growing number of ways they can help save the planet - and save money, too. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Northwest Road Crews Tally Winter Costs (2008-04-14)
Northwest transportation officials are tallying up the costs of this past winter. Avalanches, pass closures, and unrelenting snow challenged road crews and busted budgets. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Auto Parts Angel - The Meaning of Work (2008-04-14)
You talk to people in the course of your day that may not get much of your attention: the person who serves you coffee or who runs your credit card. Service jobs can be thankless and invisible. Today on The Meaning of Work, KPLU's Gary Davis takes us to the other side of the cash register.


Dalai Lama Visit A Concern for Chinese Students (2008-04-14)
Hosting the Dalai Lama on Monday is turning out to be no simple task for the University of Washington. Some Chinese students' are worried the university convocation will promote a political agenda. Other students say the UW is censoring their questions about Tibet and China. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Thiel on New Seattle Sounders FC (2008-04-11)
Major League Soccer has officially arrived in Seattle. The new team unveiled its name, colors and logo this week. And it's the topic of conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


King County Shelters In Spotlight (2008-04-11)
Dogs will get more space to run around. And cats will be free from the dogs' menacing glare. It's all part of a new plan to revamp King County's troubled animal shelters. More from KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt.


Human Footprint: An Interview with Eric Sanderson (2008-04-11)
Most of us go through our daily life without giving a lot of thought to how our activities fit into the big picture. This Sunday, the National Geographic Channel will air Human Footprint, a documentary that cleverly illustrates the sometimes startling impact each of us has on the planet. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty recently spoke with ecologist Eric Sanderson, who worked on the project.


WaMu: Whoo hoo? (2008-04-10)
Seattle-based Washington Mutual has been hit hard by the sub-prime loan crisis. The bank lost more than a billion dollars to bad loans in the first quarter of this year, and more losses are expected. The company is closing all 186 of its home loan centers around the country and cutting three-thousand jobs. WaMu holds its annual shareholder meeting next Tuesday. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein would love to ask a few questions at that meeting. He shares them with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Spring Snow Pack Report (2008-04-10)
There's been a lot more snow in the Cascades this winter than is normal. And as KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty found out, that's mostly a good thing.


Alaska Airlines Cancels Flights (2008-04-10)
Alaska Airlines joined American Airlines in cancelling flights yesterday. The groundings primarily affected flights out of Seattle and Portland, and eleven more Alaskan flights have been cancelled today. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Critics Blast Water Truce in WA (2008-04-10)
Water is quickly becoming a scarce resource in the Northwest. This week, water watchdogs are blasting the State Department of Ecology. They say the agency is failing to use its authority to stop the drilling of non-permitted residential wells. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Cuts at Seattle Times (2008-04-09)
The Seattle Times Newspaper will cut about 200 positions over the next two months. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


Two-Ton Salmon Hits the Road (2008-04-09)
West Coast fisheries are expected to be cut back to record lows this week due to sharply declining salmon stocks. A coalition of fishermen and environmentalists plans to haul a two-ton fish across the country to raise awareness of the plight of Northwest salmon. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


No Confidence Vote Possible for Schools Superintendent (2008-04-09)
State Superintendent of Public Instruction Terry Bergeson is running for re-election. She's been in office for 12 years. But her campaign could run into a few problems soon. As KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing explains, it all has to do with the WASL exam.


No Confidence Vote (2008-04-09)
State Superintendent of Public Instruction Terry Bergeson is running for re-election. She's been in office for 12 years. But her campaign could run into a few problems soon. As KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing explains, it all has to do with the WASL exam.


WSU Campuses Test Out New Emergency System (2008-04-09)
It's been almost a year since the Virginia Tech shootings on April 16, 2007. Officials at Washington State University know they can never be totally ready for an emergency like that on campus. But they plan to be as prepared as possible. Today (Wednesday), the university is testing a new system to alert students and faculty on all of its campuses. KPLU's Anna King explains.


Big Day for WaMu (2008-04-09)
Seattle-based Washington Mutual has received a seven billion-dollar ($7B) cash infusion from private investors. At the same time, the company has announced it is closing all its free-standing loan offices and laying off three-thousand people nationwide. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Food for Thought: Disgusting Snacks (2008-04-09)
She had no choice - they double dog dared her! On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein about the culinary pleasures of Larvettes.


Alaskan Way Viaduct Update (2008-04-08)
You haven't heard much recently about plans to replace Seattle's aging Alaskan Way Viaduct. But a small army has been laying the groundwork for major decisions to get made by the end of this year. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty


Key Arena Proposal Dies (2008-04-08)
The clock has run out on an offer by a group of local investors to pay half the cost of a $300 million expansion of Key Arena. The offer was seen by many as Seattle's best chance to keep the Supersonics playing basketball in the city. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty.


Debate Over Green Collar Jobs in NW (2008-04-08)
You've heard of blue collar and white collar jobs. Now there's a lot of buzz about green collar jobs. The Democratic Presidential candidates are talking about them. So are the Democratic Governors of Washington and Oregon. But even advocates are having a hard time defining what a green collar job is. And skeptics say it's a lot of hype. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Makah Whalers Convicted (2008-04-08)
The leaders of a group of rogue whalers from the Makah Tribe have been convicted of shooting and killing a gray whale. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on the federal court case.


Gregoire Launches Re-Election Campaign (2008-04-08)
Governor Chris Gregoire is on a 10-city bus tour of the state. It's the kick-off for her re-election campaign. Gregoire launched her tour in her hometown of Auburn. KPLU's Austin Jenkins was there.


Getting Pushy: A tug boat captain helps keep the ports moving (2008-04-07)
Ever look out on the Puget Sound and wonder who operates those tugboats that haul barges, move log booms and maneuver container ships in and out of port? As part of our series, The Meaning of Work, KPLU's Liam Moriarty recently found himself aboard a tug in the Port of Tacoma. He files this report.


School Ombudsman Takes Complaints (2008-04-07)
Ever run into a roadblock at your kid's school? Or wondered how exactly do the schools actually work from the inside? A new Ombudsman office in Olympia promises to hear all your public school questions and resolve your school conflicts. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt explains.


Governor Campaign Kicks-Off (2008-04-07)
Governor Chris Gregoire officially kicks off her re-election bid today (Monday) with a statewide bus tour. Her presumptive opponent, Republican Dino Rossi, launched his campaign back in October. Both candidates have already amassed sizeable war chests for their rematch. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Bio-dynamic Farming Catching on at NW Wineries (2008-04-07)
You might have noticed a new term on wine labels ... it's called bio-dynamic. The technique involves planting with the cycles of the moon, making "nettle teas" to spray on the vines and burying animal parts in the field. More than a dozen Northwest wine makers have adopted the unusual farming style. But other growers are skeptical it will yield better wine. KPLU's Anna King reports from the vineyards outside of Richland.


Parents Teach Teachers (2008-04-04)
For years it's been a catchphrase in the education world - parent engagement. Usually that means piles of flyers in the mail and PTAs. But in Seattle's Van Assalt Elementary school they're trying something different. They're inviting the parents to teach teachers how to teach their children. KPLU's Education Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt explains.


Thiel on New Seattle Arena Proposal (2008-04-04)
Just weeks after Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer and other Seattle business executives unveiled their plan for renovating Key Arena, a former Sonic rolls out a plan for an entirely new sports and entertainment arena in downtown Seattle. The proposal comes from Fred Brown, captain of the 1979 NBA champion Sonics team, and his business partner Dave Bean. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick it contains at least two really good ideas.


Food for Thought: Nancy's Fruit Trees (2008-04-04)
On todays Food for Thought, Seattle Times food writer Nancy Leson, talks about Dick Stein's least favorite agricultural product.


Hanford Negotiations May Avert Lawsuit (2008-04-04)
A lawsuit over clean-up delays at the Hanford nuclear reservation has been averted - at least for now. Top state and federal officials met this week near Seattle. They made progress toward new timelines to remove and treat nuclear waste. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Property Taxes and Big Houses (2008-04-04)
When you consider buying a home, you also need to keep in mind what the property tax will be. KPLU's John Maynard speaks with Richard Hager, a Seattle-based educator and appraiser, about a high priced-home in King County and compares that to the cheapest one on the market...property taxes and all.


NW Fruit Farmers Battle Blast of Cold (2008-04-03)
Northwest fruit growers are waking up in the wee hours of the morning to protect their fruit trees from the cold. Icy weather can kill the fruit buds and blossoms needed for a healthy crop of cherries, apricots, and apples. KPLU's Anna King has the story.


Sea Lions Get Temp Reprieve (2008-04-03)
The sea lions that feast on endangered salmon below Bonneville Dam have won a temporary reprive. The state and federal governments have agreed not to put down any of the pesky sea lions, until at least mid-month. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Governor Vetoes Sections of Toxic Toys Bill (2008-04-02)
Governor Chris Gregoire has signed into law the nation's strictest limits on toxics in toys. But she vetoed sections of the bill and is appointing a work group to come up with ways to amend the law next year. The toxic toys bill doesn't take effect until the summer of 2009. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Gray Whale Watch (2008-04-01)
Gray Whales are once again off the coast of Washington State. About 2,000 are migrating north from their Baja, California breeding grounds to feed in the Artic Sea. With a bit of luck, you might be able to see them. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


Gray Whale Watch (2008-04-01)
Gray Whales are once again off the coast of Washington State. About 2,000 are migrating north from their Baja, California breeding grounds to feed in the Artic Sea. With a bit of luck, you might be able to see them. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


Salmon Fishers Angle for Relief (2008-04-01)
People who make a living from salmon fishing on the West Coast face a no-win question. Should they fight over crumbs or just give up on the 2008 season? Salmon returns to the big rivers of the West, the Columbia and Sacramento, are plummeting. Ocean salmon fishing could be shutdown from northern Oregon all the way to the Mexican border. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from Coos Bay, Oregon, that fisherman are resigned to pleading for federal disaster relief once more.


Proposed Arena on Seattle Waterfront (2008-04-01)
Is there room for another sports arena in Seattle? Some sports figures and personalities think so. KPLU's Jennifer Wing has more.


Bad Teacher Contest (2008-04-01)
When an award is handed out, it's usually a good thing. This is not the case for a national contest that highlights the worst of the worst in the field of teaching. More from KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing.


Gray Whale Watch (2008-04-01)
Gray Whales are once again off the coast of Washington State. About 2,000 are migrating north from their Baja, California breeding grounds to feed in the Artic Sea. With a bit of luck, you might be able to see them. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


WA Gov Plans to Sign Budget (2008-04-01)
How much will she cut? That's the question as Governor Chris Gregoire prepares to sign into law an update to the state's two-year budget. The signing is scheduled for later today. As KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports, one key lawmaker expects the Governor will use her veto pen.


Tacoma Careful in Choosing School Superintendent (2008-03-31)
Tacoma public schools is looking for a new leader. The school board has selected 4 finalists for its open district superintendent position. And as KPLU's Education Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt reports there a lot more work ahead:


Foster Kid Advocates Cheer State Budget (2008-03-31)
Foster children in Washington are going to have more visits with case workers and their separated siblings. That's because the legislature put more money into foster care this year - under threat of legal action. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Section 8 Lottery (2008-03-31)
Finding an affordable place to rent is hard if you're living paycheck to paycheck. And wait lists for housing assistance programs are long. But KPLU's Paula Wissel reports on a current window of opportunity for people struggling.


Abraham Lincoln Brigade Veteran Honored (2008-03-31)
The Spanish Civil War that began in 1936 was seen by many as a prelude to World War Two. A Seattle man who is among the last surviving veterans of a group of American volunteers in that war traveled to San Francisco over the weekend. 92-year-old Abe Osheroff spoke at the dedication of a new memorial. KPLU's Liam Moriarty has the story


Tacoma Schools Careful in Choosing Superintendent (2008-03-31)
Tacoma Public Schools is looking for a new leader. The school board has selected 4 finalists for its open district superintendent position. And as KPLU's Education Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt reports, there's a lot more work ahead.


The Meaning of Work: a Techie Revealed (2008-03-30)
When you think of a software programmer, you might envision an obsessive guy sitting alone in a dark room at a keyboard, with no time to shower. But the people who work in IT say the truth is more than the cliche. This week on The Meaning of Work, KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp introduces us to an engineer at Seattle's F5 Networks.


DB Cooper Update (2008-03-28)
The DB Cooper case is known as the only unsolved skyjacking in American history. The passenger who hi-jacked a flight from Portland to Seattle 37 years ago registered under the name Dan Cooper, but the name DB has stuck over the years and is now a part of Northwest lore. A new discovery has put the case back in the national spotlight. As Andrew Theen reports, the FBI agent in charge of the case hopes the discovery of a parachute in Southwest Washington will bring some long awaited answers.


National Film Festival for Talented Youth (2008-03-28)
You can never be too young to start making movies. That's the spirit behind a new film festival in Seattle. It's happening this weekend. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


Thiel on Mariners' Season (2008-03-28)
The Mariners' regular season starts Monday (March 31st) against the Texas Rangers at Safeco Field. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about how the season is shaping up, after a month of Spring Training games.


Canada Moves Forward on Orca Protection (2008-03-28)
In the U.S., the region's orca whales are listed as endangered. Now, Canada has released its plan for protecting them. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Thiel on Mariners' Season (2008-03-28)
The Mariners' regular season starts Monday (March 31st) against the Texas Rangers at Safeco Field. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about how the season is shaping up, after a month of Spring Training games.


WA Army Unit Deploys to Iraq for Third Time (2008-03-28)
Four hundred soldiers at Fort Lewis (Washington) are preparing to head to Iraq - some for the third time. The 14th Combat Engineer Battalion held a formal deployment ceremony yesterday [Thursday]. KPLU's Austin Jenkins was there.


Where's The Innovation? (2008-03-27)
The Puget Sound region is one of the high-tech capitols of the world. Many of the companies here claim scientific research drives their success, but this may be an illusion. Mark Anderson publishes the computing industry newsletter, Strategic News Service, from his office in the San Juan Islands. He tells KPLU's Dave Meyer innovation has become a meaningless buzzword.


South Puget Sound is Focus of Science Symposium (2008-03-27)
Puget Sound is in trouble. But what's going wrong and why is a complex puzzle. In Tacoma this week, nearly 400 scientists from around the region got together to compare notes. KPLU's Liam Moriarty has more.


Olympics Good for Entire Northwest (2008-03-27)
The chief of the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver says the Olympics are a once in a lifetime opportunity that will mean great things for not only Vancouver, BC, but the Pacific Northwest, as well. Glenn Mosley reports


Water War: The Fight Over Wells in WA (2008-03-27)
These days property owners need a permit to do just about anything. But not to drill a well. Now with explosive growth in parts of the rural Northwest - and water in short supply - some are asking: should there be more restrictions on well-drilling? KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Basketball Stars Not Graduating College (2008-03-27)
Washington State University's basketball team faces off against University of North Carolina tonight. But a new report is more concerned with another challenge ahead of these players - school. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


Tips for Protecting Against ID Theft When You Travel (2008-03-27)
ID theft isn't just a worry at home. It's also a concern when you're on a trip. Now the Washington Attorney General's office is issuing tips on how to protect your identity when traveling. Olympia KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


NW States Update Organ Donation Laws (2008-03-26)
When an organ donor dies, hours count. Now Washington, Oregon and Idaho have updated their organ donation laws to make sure they're uniform and streamlined. The Washington law was signed today [Tuesday]. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains what it means. :56


Scientists Compare Notes on South Puget Sound (2008-03-26)
What do you get when you put nearly 400 scientists together to share their research? Organizers of the South Sound Science Symposium in Tacoma Wednesday hope you get progress toward a healthier Puget Sound. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Washington Prepares for E-Waste Recycling (2008-03-26)
When broadcasters make the switch to digital next February, millions of analog television sets won't work any more. Lots of people are expected to ditch their old sets and buy new digital TVs. Washington is gearing up an innovative recycling system to make sure all that electronic trash doesn't end up dumped overseas. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


More Dams May Become Reality (2008-03-26)
For years heated debate has focused on taking out the four lower Snake River dams and other obstructions to salmon habitat in the Pacific Northwest. But now, Washington officials are looking seriously at building more dams. The state is studying a handful of sites mainly in Eastern Washington for more water storage. KPLU'S Richland Correspondent Anna King explains. 1:35


New Holly Lawsuit (2008-03-26)
A public housing development in south Seattle that mixes low income units with higher end homes is being sued. Homeowners say they've had serious problems with every thing from heat to water. More from KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel.


Food for Thought: Nancy's New Gig (2008-03-26)
No longer will she be the mysteriously anonymous restaurant critic for the Seattle Times. Now, Nancy Leson's got a brand new foodie bag - as she tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Housing Prices Drop (2008-03-26)
For the first time since the national housing slump began, Seattle and Portland are showing a drop in home prices, according to a national report out this week. Oregon Public Radio's Rob Manning reports.


Fighting Underage Drinking (2008-03-25)
Underage drinking is often highest in better off neighborhoods. For example, Roosevelt and Nathan Hale high schools in northeast Seattle have higher rates of alcohol use than the rest of the city or the state. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports on community efforts to turn it around.


Makah Plea Deal Falls Apart (2008-03-25)
Five Makah Indians facing federal charges for a rogue whale hunt last year had planned to plead guilty in a deal that would have spared them jail time. But as KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports, the deal abruptly fell apart in court.


Colleges-Tribes Agreement (2008-03-25)
Five area colleges and universities have joined together to provide education and services to tribal peoples in the Pacific Northwest. KPLU's Glenn Mosley reports.


Digital TV Conversion Will Bring Recycling Challenges (2008-03-25)
Next year's planned shift from analog television broadcasts to digital could mean more electronic waste, as millions of consumers across the country replace their old analog TV sets. Washington is bracing for the switch with a new recycling program. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Burrowing Owls in Trouble (2008-03-25)
As spring comes, burrowing owls are starting to return home from their winter vacation in the Southwest. The small owls lay eggs in the abandoned dens of badgers and ground squirrels. But the birds are in trouble. KPLU's Richland Correspondent Anna King follows a group of volunteers as they explore one of the last places in the Pacific Northwest where the birds still thrive.


Pulling Plug on Public Toilets (2008-03-24)
Sleek, self-cleaning public toilets debuted in downtown Seattle with a lot of fanfare four years ago. Now the city says the German built structures have become magnets for nefarious activity. A new report recommends getting rid of them. More from KPLU's Paula Wissel.


Quality Higher Education to American Indians in NW (2008-03-24)
Five institutions of higher education in the Northwest plan to sign an agreement today (Monday) to deliver quality education and services to American Indians. Reporter Glenn Mosely has more.


DNA Backlog in Washington (2008-03-24)
More sex offenders in Washington will soon have to submit a DNA sample to a state database. That's because of a new state law. But the requirement promises to add to an already major backlog at the state's DNA lab. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Flocks of Finches Die on Stevens Pass (2008-03-24)
It's a case of unintended consequences. This winter's heavy snows required 20-thousand tons more deicer on Washington's highways and mountain passes than last year. But that salty solution is being fingered for killing flocks of finches and browning the needles of evergreen trees. KPLU's Richland Correspondent Anna King explains.


The Enforcer (2008-03-24)
Unless you are from another country and are in the United States illegally, you probably won't cross paths with Neil Clark. In the latest installment of the Meaning of Work, KPLU's Jennifer Wing introduces us to the man who oversees the removal of illegal immigrants.


Washington Trade Reps Touring State (2008-03-23)
Exporting is a business that's looking increasingly attractive. The weakness of the US dollar means selling your wares abroad can be more lucrative. A special group of government officials have been touring Washington this week reaching out to small and medium-sized companies that want to get into international trade. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Pregnant Moms (and Dads-To-Be) Smoke Cigarettes (2008-03-21)
Most expecting mothers are pretty clear that they should steer clear of alcohol. Some know that cigarettes aren't too great either. But a new University of Washington study asks what happens after the pregnancy? And what about the dads? KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Thiel on Seahawks Changes (2008-03-21)
Some big names have recently left the Seahawks. And perhaps the biggest name is yet to come. It's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Tracking Quality Health Care (2008-03-21)
Sharing information in the digital-age seems like an easy task. But the health care industry is still catching up. That's the assessment from the nation's top health official. But one local initiative has caught the Fed's attention. KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis explains.


Alaska Pilots Leafleting (2008-03-21)
If you've been to SeaTac Airport recently, you might have seen uniformed pilots leafleting. They've been handing out information about current contract negotiations and their willingness to go on strike. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


The Dreaded D Word (2008-03-20)
Now that most analysts seem to agree the United States economy is in a recession, financial commentator Greg Heberlein says it's time to think about the unthinkable. Is a Depression possible? Greg spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Iraq War Protest (2008-03-20)
A small but dedicated crowd of about 200 marked the fifth anniversary of the start of the Iraq war with a rally at Westlake Plaza in downtown Seattle Wednesday night. KPLU's Liam Moriarty was there.


Alaska Pilots Leafleting at Seatac (2008-03-20)
If you've been to SeaTac Airport recently, you might have seen uniformed pilots leafleting. They've been handing out information about current contract negotiations and their willingness to go on strike. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Starbucks Appealing in Tipping Suit (2008-03-20)
A Superior Court judge in San Diego has ordered Starbucks to pay its California baristas more than $100 million in back tips that had been paid to shift supervisors. The coffee chain says it will vigorously appeal. KPLU Business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has more.


High Court Approves Top-Two Primary (2008-03-19)
You won't have to vote a "straight party ticket" in future primary elections in Washington. The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the state's open primary election system, which was challenged by the major political parties. KPLU's Tom Banse has more on how the voting will work now.


Protesters Rally Outside Military Recruitment Offices (2008-03-19)
Anti-war activists throughout the region have been organizing vigils and rallies for today to mark their opposition to 5 years of war in Iraq. In Seattle and Tacoma the morning plan was to shut down military recruitment offices through civil protest. More from KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt.


Fish-Eating Sea Lions Get Death Sentence From Feds (2008-03-19)
The federal government has given the go-ahead to kill salmon-crushing sea lions that lurk near the base of the Bonneville Dam in the Columbia River. The license to kill comes after firecrackers, rubber bullets and hundred-mile relocations failed. KPLU's Anna King has the story.


Food for Thought: Noodles (2008-03-19)
KPLU's Dick Stein is a lover of Asian-style noodles from way back. Lately, he's noticed they've been getting a lot of press. He talks about that with Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson on today's Food for Thought.


Starbucks Annual Meeting (2008-03-19)
Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz promises investors the company will fight to the death to return value to the coffee chain, despite economic challenges. Its stock has been falling steadily for more than a year. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp attended the annual shareholders meeting in Seattle and has the story.


Opposing the War (2008-03-19)
As bombs began to fall in Baghdad five years ago, opposition in Seattle was intense. At the time, there were daily protest marches and tensions with police. So, what's the current state of anti-war activism here? KPLU's Paula Wissel takes a look.


Food for Thought: Noodles (2008-03-19)
KPLU's Dick Stein is a lover of Asian-style noodles from way back. Lately, he's noticed they've been getting a lot of press. He talks about that with Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson on today's Food for Thought.


Prices Up in Gas and Groceries (2008-03-18)
Rising fuel prices are contributing to rising prices in grocery stores around the Northwest. Glenn Mosley reports.


New Advice on Drug Disposal (2008-03-18)
We've been telling you about trace amounts of medicines and drugs turning up in river water or drinking water. Scientists have yet to establish whether the very low levels detected are harmful. But the drug industry and the US Fish and Wildlife Service are updating their advice anyway for what to do with unused medicines. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Dangerous Highway 2 Gets Help (2008-03-18)
The road between Everett and Stevens Pass is one of the state's most deadly. Nearly 50 people have been killed over the past decade along US Highway 2. Now, new safety measures are being put in place. KPLU's Gary Davis explains.


Virgin America Enters Seattle Market (2008-03-18)
There was a big party at Sea-Tac Airport today (Tuesday 3-18.) Low-fare carrier Virgin America launched its new service from Seattle with a fleet of Airbus jets and a promise of putting fun back into flying. And as KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp explains, the service aims to take a piece of the market from Seattle-based Alaska Air.


Supreme Court OK's State's Top-Two Primary (2008-03-18)
The long legal fight over the way state voters choose candidates in a primary election got a ruling from the Supreme Court today. By a 7-to-2 decision, the justices upheld Washington's top-two primary. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Washington Cracks Down on Private Dams (2008-03-18)
In Northwest farm country, growers build large earthen dams to hold water for their crops. But recently, some of those dams have failed. Now, Washington state officials say they are cracking down on farmers who build private dams without permits. KPLU's Anna King explains.


Virgin America Comes to Seattle (2008-03-18)
Alaska Airlines now has some tough competition on its popular California routes. The new airline Virgin America has launched three daily non-stop flights between Seattle and its home base, San Francisco - with connections to New York and other east coast cities. In April, Virgin plans to expand the service to include several flights a day to LA. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp says the new carrier is aiming to get your business not just with its prices.


New Advice on Drug Disposal (2008-03-18)
We've been telling you about trace amounts of medicines and drugs turning up in river water or drinking water. Scientists have yet to establish whether the very low levels detected are harmful. But the drug industry and the US Fish and Wildlife Service are updating their advice anyway for what to do with unused medicines. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Roots of Empathy (2008-03-18)
The best way to get the schoolyard bully to stop picking on others might not be time outs and lectures from adults. Some educators think the way to reach these kids is through a newborn baby. Tapping the power that an infant has on our emotions is the heart of a program called Roots of Empathy. It's making its U.S. debut in the Seattle area. More, from KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing .


New Advice on Drug Disposal (2008-03-18)
We've been telling you about trace amounts of medicines and drugs turning up in river water or drinking water. Scientists have yet to establish whether the very low levels detected are harmful. But the drug industry and the US Fish and Wildlife Service are updating their advice anyway for what to do with unused medicines. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Highway 2 Safety (2008-03-17)
The road between Everett and Stevens Pass is one of the state's most deadly. Nearly 50 people have been killed over the past decade along US Highway 2. Now, new safety measures are being put in place. KPLU's Gary Davis explains.


Citywide Drug Tests in the Northwest (2008-03-17)
Sewage doesn't lie. And it only takes a teaspoon to administer a citywide drug test. Researchers at Oregon State University have started testing sewage samples to gauge the consumption of illegal drugs. Oregon is cooperating . . . and sampling at Washington treatment plants could start later this year. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


St. Patrick's Day Card (2008-03-17)
Four Seattle musicians have discovered there's truth in the saying "The luck of the Irish". For today's St. Patrick's Day, Hallmark Cards has chosen a song by their band for a new musical card. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


RV Sales Slump (2008-03-17)
RV's are a common sight on the northwest highways. Our region also manufactures some of the swankiest motor homes on the market. But, slumping RV sales have led to layoffs at plants in Washington and Oregon. The reason isn't necessarily what you'd expect. KPLU's Chris Lehman has more.


Drive By Case Goes to U. S. Supreme Court (2008-03-17)
A drive by shooting that shook Seattle 14 years ago is back in the news. The U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether to reinstate murder charges against the teen who was the driver of the car involved in the killing. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


WA Trade Week Helping Businesses Expand Overseas (2008-03-17)
Many people know that Washington is the most trade-dependent state in the U.S. That's mostly because of Boeing. But there are also a lot of smaller companies that rely on a good export market to keep them going. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp spoke with one of them - who's getting a little help from the state government.


Garbage as Biofuel (2008-03-17)
Northwest biodiesel and ethanol production is on the rise. But most of the raw materials come from far away. Midwestern corn and soybeans, for example, or canola oil from Canada. A new study by the Pacific Northwest National Lab suggests the path to truly "homegrown" fuel might lead to the garbage dump. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Despite Bumps, Amgen Looks Ahead (2008-03-17)
It's been a bumpy past few months for Amgen, the pharmaceutical firm that employs about a thousand people in the Seattle area. Despite staff cutbacks and reduced sales forecasts, a local company leader says the future remains bright. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


The Meaning of Work: Industrial Strength (2008-03-16)
Have you turned a light switch on in the last few minutes? Filled up your gas tank lately? On today's Meaning of Work we meet a man who says without industrial workers like himself those things wouldn't even be possible. KPLU's Paula Wissel has his story.


Democrats Proud as WA Legislature Adjourns (2008-03-14)
A ban on toxic toys. More rights for domestic partners. A budget that leaves 800-million dollars in the bank. These are just a few of the bills that pased duing the 2008 state legislature. The session wrapped up last night (Thursday). KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more.


2008 Washington Legislature Adjourns (2008-03-14)
The 2008 session of the state legislature is officially over. The final gavel fell just before 8 o'clock last night. Lawmakers spent the last day of the 60-day session passing a $300 million update to the two-year budget. But as KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports, the session may be remembered more for what wasn't done.


Injured Vets Discover Golf's Benefits (2008-03-14)
For the thirty-thousand-plus US troops who've returned home from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan with severe injuries, recovery can be difficult and isolating. KPLU's Gary Davis tells us how some local vets are finding community and support through a familiar sport.


Thiel on Legislature Saying No to Sonics Plan (2008-03-14)
The Legislature has adjourned for the year without taking action on a plan by Seattle business leaders to help renovate Key Arena. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about the latest developments.


Ocean Salmon Fishing Outlook Bleak (2008-03-14)
You may see less wild salmon in your grocery store, or at least, end up paying more for it. That's because there's a possibility that West Coast salmon fishing will be completely shut down this year from northern Oregon all the way to Mexico. That's the word out of a fisheries management meeting this week. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


It's A Recession (2008-03-13)
A recession is usually defined as two quarters of negative economic growth. By that standard, we won't know if we're in one until June at the earliest. But financial commentator Greg Heberlein tells KPLU's Dave Meyer there's no need to wait.


WA Democrats Reach Budget Deal (2008-03-13)
House and Senate Democrats in the State Legislature have agreed on an update to the state's two year budget. It spends $300-million and leaves a little more than $800-million in the bank. KPLU's Austin Jenkins tells us what made it into the budget.


Redevelopment in Columbia Gorge Stirs Passion (2008-03-12)
One of the scenic wonders of the Northwest is at a crossroads. The bi-state Columbia Gorge Commission wrestled inconclusively all day yesterday (Tuesday) with a proposed new destination resort. Tonight, a large new tribal casino is up for discussion by a different agency. Those projects - and several others - could bring new energy to the national scenic area... or ruin it, depending on your point of view. KPLU's Tom Banse has more from the scene.


Seattle Proposal for Green Cabs (2008-03-12)
The Mayor of Seattle wants to require all taxis that the city licenses to get at least 30 miles per gallon. At the same time he's proposing to nearly double the number of medallions issued for taxi drivers. As you might imagine, these ideas are controversial. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Bill Gates Speaks to Congress (2008-03-12)
Why can't the United States be more like Canada? That's the question Bill Gates posed to lawmakers in Washington D.C. Wednesday. The Microsoft chairman was testifying before a congressional technology committee. KPLU's Paula Wissel has the story.


Outside Support Helps With Weight Loss (2008-03-12)
If hours at the gym and diets aren't quite working, it might be time to try some personal intervention. A new study done in the Pacific Northwest has found that people trying to lose weight were more likely to keep it off if they had outside support. Bilal Qureshi reports.


Food for Thought: Dick's High Class Crab Feed (2008-03-12)
KPLU's Dick Stein is never one to turn down a chance at a free meal. On today's Food for Thought, Dick tells Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson all about his Giant Tasmanian Crab adventure at Tacoma's Sea Grill.


Flurry of Bills Pass WA Legislature in Final Days (2008-03-12)
State lawmakers are sending a flurry of bills to the Governor in the final days of the session. The topics run the gamut: from "whale watching rules" to tougher sex offender laws. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Seattle Mayor Wants All Cabs Green (2008-03-12)
You've heard of Yellow cabs, even Orange Cabs - but how about Green ones? Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels wants to require all the cabs in the city to get 30 miles per gallon. And he wants the city to nearly double the number of medallions it issues - so more people could rely on cabs and leave their cars at home. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Boeing Explains Air Force Bid Protest (2008-03-11)
Boeing has formally accused the U.S. Air Force of irregularities and unfairness in its award of the $35-billion-dollar tanker deal. The company responded to questions about its complaint shortly before submitting the objections to the federal Government Accountability Office. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Legislature Steps in to Referee Math Wars (2008-03-11)
Call it the million dollar fight over how math should be taught in Washington State schools. The legislature is poised to spend another $150-thousand to hire a consultant to review another consultant's work. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Legislature Steps in to Referee Math Wars (2008-03-11)
Call it the million dollar fight over how math should be taught in Washington State schools. The legislature is poised to spend another $150-thousand to hire a consultant to review another consultant's work. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Legislature Steps in to Referee Math Wars (2008-03-11)
Call it the million dollar fight over how math should be taught in Washington State schools. The legislature is poised to spend another $150-thousand to hire a consultant to review another consultant's work. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Legislature Steps in to Referee Math Wars (2008-03-11)
Call it the million dollar fight over how math should be taught in Washington State schools. The legislature is poised to spend another $150-thousand to hire a consultant to review another consultant's work. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Boeing Gives Details of GAO Complaint (2008-03-11)
The federal government has 100 days to issue a ruling on the formal protest filed by the Boeing Company. The company described its reasons for the move in a conference call. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


UW Students Share Secrets (2008-03-11)
Over the past few years, a project called Post-Secret has been receiving anonymous confessions from across the country. The confessions are then made public online and in books. A new class at the University of Washington has decided to mimic the project on campus. They've solicited secrets from the UW community. Now they're unveiling their findings. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has the story.


NW Wineries Switch to Glass Corks (2008-03-11)
Northwest wine drinkers are well familiar with the ongoing debate over cork versus screwtops. Now there's a third way. About a half-dozen wineries have switched to glass stoppers. KPLU's Tom Banse explains why.


The Meaning of Work: An Immigrant's Flight Path to Boeing (2008-03-10)
For years, the word Boeing was synonymous with Seattle. And despite all the ups and downs, Boeing still employs more people in Washington than any other business. One of them is Bulgarian-born mechanical engineer Svetlana Spassova. She literally won a lottery to get her job. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp has her story in our latest installment of the Meaning of Work.


Boeing Protesting Air Force Decision (2008-03-10)
Boeing has announced it is formally protesting the U.S. Air Force decision to buy new re-fuelling tankers from Northrop-Grummon and the Airbus parent company EADS. The protest will be submitted Tuesday to the Government Accountability Office, which will have 100 days to rule. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Mitigating Pandemic Flu (2008-03-10)
The impact of a pandemic flu outbreak could be greatly reduced even without a vaccine. KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis explains what a team of local researchers have found.


CCC Alumni Celebrate 75th Anniversary (2008-03-10)
This month marks the 75th anniversary of the creation of the Civilian Conservation Corps. The men who signed up for the Depression-era jobs program built local trails and improved parks that we still use today. The program's alumni are now in their eighties and nineties. KPLU's Tom Banse spoke to several who say now may be a good time to revive a version of the CCC.


WA Legislature Enters Home Stretch (2008-03-10)
The State legislature is in the home stretch. The 60-day session is scheduled to wrap up this Thursday. Lawmakers still have to pass an update to the state's two-year budget. But otherwise, much of the heavy-lifting is done. Majority Democrats say they've been active, but prudent. Republicans counter that Democrats have spent too much and are punting on big issues. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Global Wind Map on the Web (2008-03-09)
If you want to use wind energy, you've got to know where the wind blows. Now, a Seattle firm has launched a website that will map the potential for wind energy across the globe. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Toxic Toy Bill on Life Support in WA Legislature (2008-03-07)
A proposal to limit toxic chemicals in children's toys is on life support in the State Senate. And with a key deadline looming, the bill may be doomed. Supporters say industry lobbying and poison pill amendments are to blame. Tonight is the deadline to pass the toy safety bill off the Senate floor. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Local Investors Bid For Sonics (2008-03-07)
A group of Seattle business giants wants to buy the Seattle Sonics. The offer is impressive, but faces a tough political battle and a race against the clock. KPLU's Gary Davis has the story.


Thiel on Seattle Plan to Renovate Key Arena, Keep Sonics (2008-03-07)
The city of Seattle has made it official. Four prominent business leaders want to help fund a renovation of Key Arena and purchase an NBA team to play there, preferably the Sonics. The plan includes a financial contribution from the city. But it also needs approval from state lawmakers, who adjourn next week. It's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Analysts Say More 787 Delays (2008-03-07)
A tough week for Boeing got even tougher on Friday. After the loss of a 40-billion dollar bid to build refueling tankers for the U.S. Air Force, it looks like there is another delay of the new 787 jetliner. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:03)


Northwest African American Museum Opens (2008-03-07)
A new museum opens Saturday (March 8th) in Seattle. The Northwest African-American Museum occupies the restored Colman School in the city's historically black Central Area. KPLU's Gary Davis paid a visit.


It's Elementary (2008-03-07)
For most elementary students, the words gay and lesbian are often heard for the first time on the playground, and the words are meant to hurt. A handful of schools in Washington State and around the country are teaching students about gay and lesbian issues. Many of the teachers have been inspired to do this by the 1996 documentary It's Elementary-Talking About Gay Issues in Schools. KPLU's Jennifer Wing spoke with the film's director, Debra Chasnoff


Jury Convicts Earth Liberation Front Arsonist (2008-03-07)
A jury has convicted a reputed Earth Liberation Front lookout for the 2001 arson that leveled a University of Washington research building. But the jury deadlocked on several other charges lodged against 32-year-old Briana Waters. Her defense attorneys are calling the verdict a "tragedy." KPLU's Tom Banse has this in-depth report, from the federal courthouse in Tacoma.


Independents Voice in Health Care Reform (2008-03-06)
Political observers agree that the nation's independent voters will likely decide the next President. But those same independents are often ignored once the race is over. That's the view from a bipartisan health care reform group, based in Seattle. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


Hotel Workers Rising for Boycott in Seatac (2008-03-06)
It's been a month now since unionized hotel workers at the Doubletree and Hilton in Seatac voted for a boycott of their employers. They want better wages and working conditions, but contract talks have gone nowhere. Now, community groups are rallying behind the boycott. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has more. (1:54)


WA Joins Idaho in Uranium Factory Bid (2008-03-06)
Washington State is joining Idaho in the pursuit of a huge uranium processing plant. The two Northwest states are among the finalists in a competition to lure a $2 billion nuclear fuel factory. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Hotel Workers Call for Boycott (2008-03-06)
Workers at the Seatac Hilton and Doubletree are asking people not to eat, sleep or meet at those hotels. The boycott call comes amid contract talks over better pay and conditions. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:12)


WA Legislature Passes Climate Change Proposal (2008-03-06)
The state legislature has passed sweeping climate change legislation. It mandates major reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. It also calls for a major reduction in the number of miles people drive their cars each year. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Real Estate Commentary: Ugly Homes (2008-03-06)
It's blocking you view and casting a long shadow where the sun used to shine -- it's that house next door that's getting bigger and bigger. KPLU's John Maynard talks to Real Estate expert Richard Hagar about just how big houses can get in Seattle and still be legal.


NW States Look for Ideas to Clean Up Columbia River Gorge (2008-03-06)
How do you clean up dirty Northwest air? That's the question being posed not to scientists, but to residents of the Columbia Gorge yestserday in Hood River. Oregon and Washington environmental officials want fresh ideas on how to clear out the smog from one of the Northwest's most iconic locales. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Meet the New State Ferries Director: Interview with David Moseley (2008-03-06)
Washington's state ferry service has a new Director. 60-year-old David Moseley started this week after his predecessor's resignation in December. The system is struggling with a nearly 30-million-dollar deficit and an aging fleet of boats that seem to break down on a daily basis. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp sat down with him in his office and has this interview. (4:53)


Health Care Reform Survey (2008-03-05)
When it comes to the health care debate, it's easy to believe the nation's voters are deeply divided. New research from a bi-partisan health care reform effort shows most voters know what they want. The question is, will the political parties listen? KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis explains.


WA Republicans Unveil $6B Highway Plan (2008-03-05)
Minority Republicans in the state legislature say they have a plan to reduce highway congestion and fund key transportation projects. And it won't require a tax hike. GOP lawmakers unveiled a proposal yesterday they say would raise six-billion-dollars over ten years. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Math Wars: How to Teach Math in Schools (2008-03-05)
Have you heard of the Math Wars? This is a reference to the ongoing battle over how kids should be taught math in school. Basically, it's a fight between tradionalists and reformers. Teachers, parents and policy-makers are grappling with this issue. And things have gotten heated. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Food for Thought: Cooking for the Neighbors (2008-03-05)
On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein what's cooking - who's cooking - in her neighborhood.


Ham Radio to the Rescue (2008-03-04)
There will be a six-point-seven earthquake in Seattle Wednesday. But you won't feel it. It will be pretend - part of an exercise called Sound Shake '08. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, the purpose is to test our region's emergency communication systems.


What's Next for Boeing After Tanker Loss? (2008-03-04)
Boeing and several members of Congress are pushing hard for answers from the U.S. Air Force on why Boeing lost the bid for new re-fueling tankers. But, as the company considers how it might contest the award, one local analyst says Boeing should just move on. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:30)


WA Tax Constitutionally Questioned (2008-03-04)
Do Washington State lawmakers need a two-thirds vote to raise taxes? Washington voters have passed two initiatives that say yes. But Senate Majority Leader Lisa Brown thinks the requirement is unconstitutional. She's filed a lawsuit with the State Supreme Court to overturn the super-majority rule. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


National Grammar Day: A Conversation With Martha Brockenbrough (2008-03-04)
You might not know it, but today is National Grammar Day. The brand-new holiday was proclaimed by Seattle-based writer Martha Brockenbrough. KPLU's Liam Moriarty chats with the former high school teacher and self-described grammar enthusiast.


Activist Pleads Not Guilty (2008-03-04)
Environmental activist Tre Arrow has pleaded not-guilty to 14 counts of arson, malicious damage, and conspiracy yesterday in Portland. KPLU's Kristian Foden-Vencil has more on court action.


New Foreclosure Counseling Hotline in WA (2008-03-03)
Help is a phone call away for Northwest residents facing foreclosure. Two toll free numbers are now active. One is a national hotline. The other is for Washington State. That one became active over the weekend. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more.


Gang Forum (2008-03-03)
Law enforcement knows there is an increase in gang activity. Now a task force created by the legislature is working to figure out how bad the situation is in schools. More from KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing.


Misunderstood Banners in Yakima Coming Down (2008-03-03)
Light pole banners are becoming a common way for Northwest cities to spruce up their downtown. But in one Central Washington city some abstract banners have become a real-life Rorschach test. The banners were supposed to depict sunrays, but they are coming down because too many Yakima residents say the "jagged stripes of yellow" look like guns. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Builders React to Blaze (2008-03-03)
The FBI is investigating the torching of luxury homes near Woodinville as a possible act of domestic terrorism. Explosive devices were found in all of the burned houses. A white sheet at the sight was painted with the initials of the Earth Liberation Front. More from KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel.


UW Students Want Help with "Hidden Disabilities" (2008-03-03)
If you are blind or in a wheelchair at the University of Washington, the school will accommodate you. But what if you have an invisible disability -- like a learning challenge or a mental illness? As KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports, then it gets more complicated.


Meaning of Work: Making Picture Day Painless (2008-03-03)
It lives on the refrigerator, sits on the mantle or hides in the wallet. The school picture reminds us of first grade, second grade, or 12th grade... In this Meaning of Work, we meet a Tacoma man who creates those memories. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt introduces us to a school photographer.


Investing in White Center (2008-03-03)
Giving a child a good start in life goes a long way. That belief is motivating a multi million dollar investment in White Center, just south of Seattle. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing


Air Force Readies for Tanker Decision (2008-02-29)
It's been nearly four years since an ethics scandal derailed Boeing's deal to build refuelling tankers for the U.S. Airforce. Now the aerospace giant is competing against an Airbus-Northrup Grumman venture for a $40-billion-dollar contract. The much-awaited decision is expected today (Friday 2-28). More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Leap Year Birthday (2008-02-29)
It's leap year, and today is that special day that comes round just once every four years - February 29th. Of course, for people born on this day, its arrival is really welcome. KPLU's Shirley Skeel reports.


Boeing Loses Air Force Tanker Deal (2008-02-29)
The Air Force wants Airbus and Northrup Grumman to build its new fleet of aerial refueling tankers. The announcement is a major defeat for The Boeing Company, the rival bidder. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Weyerhaeuser-Chevron Joint Venture (2008-02-29)
Weyerhaeuser and Chevron are teaming up on bio-fuels. They've formed a new joint venture that aims to crack the code for large-scale production of cellulosic ethanol. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has details. (0:51)


Washington Day Cares Could Unionize (2008-02-29)
More day care directors and workers in Washington State may soon have the right to unionize. Support appears strong for a proposal moving through the Democratically-controlled legislature. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Thiel on Mariners Spring Training Optimism (2008-02-29)
It's not officially spring yet. But it may feel like it to Mariner fans. The team has begun spring training play in Arizona. And the new manager for the Mariners has quite a sunny outlook for the team this year. Too sunny, in fact, for Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel, who tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick there could be a few dark clouds on the horizon.


Weyerhaeuser and Chevron Form Biofuels Company (2008-02-29)
Weyerhaeuser has formed a new company - called Catchlight Energy. It's a joint venture with Chevron, focused on manufacturing bio-fuels made from wood and other plant materials. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:04)


Accused Arsonist Maintains Innocence (2008-02-28)
The accused lookout in an arson pinned on radical environmentalists maintained her innocence on the witness stand yesterday. The 32-year-old violin teacher is the only person arrested in the lengthy investigation of politically motivated arsons to go to trial. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from the federal courthouse in Tacoma.


WSU Revokes Fraternity Recognition (2008-02-28)
Washington State University has revoked recognition of a campus fraternity for violating university policy and selling drugs. Reporter Glenn Mosley has more.


Teachers Vs Legislature: Pay Raise (2008-02-28)
Majority Democrats in the state legislature are getting an earful from the teachers' union. THe Washington Education Association has launched an ad campaign to convince lawmakers to fund an extra one-percent pay raise. But it's a tough sell. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Project Inkwell (2008-02-28)
Library card catalogs are now relics of history. Can printed books be far behind? The Information Age relies on computers, and this is a problem for public schools. Conventional laptop computers are too fragile and expensive to hand out to each student. Mark Anderson is KPLU's technology commentator and is also CEO of Project Inkwell, which is setting a standard for educational computing. He spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Rescue Tug to End Season (2008-02-28)
The rescue tugboat that's been stationed at Washington's northwest tip will be pulled from service when its funding runs out next week. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story


WA Transportation Crisis (2008-02-28)
The Seattle Viaduct hasn't collapsed and the 520 bridge over Lake Washington hasn't sunk. Even so, Washington State is facing a transportation crisis. Ferriers are failing. Roads are crubmling. Congestion is building. And money is running out. At the same time, the cost to build am daintain roads is skyrocketing. So what does the future hold? KPLU's Austin Jenkins recently put that question to several transportation leaders in the state, and has this in-depth report.


NW Churchgoers (2008-02-28)
The Northwest has a reputation for low church-attendance, and a new study by the Pew Research Center reinforces that image. KPLU's Chris Lehman has the story.


New Jazz CD Releases (2008-02-27)
A lot of jazz artists have new releases out. They range from tribute albums to jazz versions of country tunes! KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Music Director Nick Francis about some of his top picks.


New Emergency Center (2008-02-27)
The next time there's a major earthquake, the city of Seattle says it will be better prepared to deal with it. KPLU's Paula Wissel attended the unveiling of the city's new emergency operations center in the International District.


Democrats Don't Always Agree (2008-02-27)
What's more important: giving teachers a raise or funding all day kindergarten? In Olympia, House Democrats say the raise. Senate Democrats say kindergarten. That difference of opinion highlights an often overlooked reality: majority Democrats don't always see eye to eye. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Washington Exports Boom (2008-02-27)
Washington exported more than $9-billion worth of produce, grain, and meat last year, according to a new federal report. That's almost a 40 percent increase from 2006. KPLU's Anna King explains why more Washington goods are shipping out.


Photo Traffic Enforcement Expanding (2008-02-27)
After a slow start, photo traffic enforcement is growing rapidly in popularity in the Northwest. Cameras automatically catch drivers who run red lights in more than a dozen cities. You then get get the ticket in the mail. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on the newest converts to the technology.


Local Salmon for Local Consumers (2008-02-27)
Some Puget Sound family fishermen are hoping a bill making its way through the legislature in Olympia helps them put local salmon on your plate. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story.


Admin Scolded over Tsunami Funding (2008-02-27)
Northwest members of Congress have publicly scolded the admiral in charge of tsunami warning and education. The politicians are upset that a federal agency diverted tsunami money that was supposed to flow to the West Coast. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Gregoire Testifies on S-CHIP (2008-02-26)
Governor Christine Gregoire says new federal regulations will make it impossible for the state to achieve its goal of providing all children with health insurance. Gregoire testified before Congress on the federal S-CHIP program today. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


Pierce County Reads (2008-02-26)
More than one-thousand people in Pierce County are paying a visit to the African Country Botswana. No, they aren't getting on a plane. They're doing it through a book: The Number One Ladies' Detective Agency. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing http://www.piercecountylibrary.org/reading-books/pierce-county-reads/


State Transportation Budget (2008-02-26)
Not now, but in the future, Washington drivers will have to pay more when it comes to transportation. That was the reality check legislators heard yesterday from transportation leaders in the State Senate. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Jet Test of Biofuels (2008-02-26)
A Seattle company supplied nut oil for the first flight test of a Boeing jet using biofuels. A blend with regular jet fuel recently powered a Virgin Atlantic airliner from London to Amsterdam. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Starbucks Retraining Baristas (2008-02-26)
Starbucks is closing more than seven thousand of its shops tonight (Tuesday,2-26-08.) For three hours starting at 5:30, the company will shut all company-owned stores nationwide and re-train baristas in "espresso excellence." More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:53)


Meaning of Work: Lunch Lady for the Office Crowd (2008-02-25)
Have you ever liked a lunch spot so much you just had to tell your friends about it? If so, you're the kind of customer Judy Lew wants and needs. She runs the Harbor Cafe in downtown Seattle. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick has her story, in this week's installment of our series The Meaning of Work.


Snow Mold Worries Washington Wheat Farmers (2008-02-25)
It may be dry here in western Washington, but a blanket of snow still persists in many parts of the inland Northwest. Some of the white stuff can be helpful for wheat crops. It adds moisture to the soil and protects the plants from frost. But if the snow sticks around too long it can decimate a crop. KPLU's Anna King explains why.


Starbucks Shops To Close For Training (2008-02-25)
If an evening trip to Starbucks is part of your routine, you'll be out of luck tomorrow (Tuesday.) The company is shutting down more than seven thousand of its shops for three hours to re-train baristas nationwide. It's part of CEO Howard Schultz' initiatives to improve the customer experience and restore shareholder value. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:10)


Electric Bills Could Drop (2008-02-25)
Your electric utility has a decision to make that could result in bill credits or a one-time refund for some folks. Regionwide, there are hundreds of millions of dollars on the table. We get more from KPLU's Tom Banse.


Gov. Gregoire Says: Save Your Pennies (2008-02-25)
This might be the week to skip that latte or pack your lunch. It's "America Saves Week" - a nationwide effort to get people to spend less and sock away more. Governor Chris Gregoire is joining the effort. She's declared "Washington Saves Week." KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Planning for Puget Sound Cleanup Moves Forward (2008-02-25)
If you've got an opinion about how to go about restoring Puget Sound, now's your chance to weigh in. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Seattle Public School Enrollment Remains Stagnant (2008-02-25)
It's been more than a decade since Seattle Public Schools has seen any growth in its student population. And don't expect that to change anytime soon. A new report shows district enrollment staying the same or continuing to decline over the next 10 years. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Washington's Independents On The Move (2008-02-22)
Senator Barack Obama is getting strong backing from Washington's independents, enough to easily defeat Senator John McCain in the state if they were to face off for President. That's just one finding of a new poll conducted by a non-partisan group of university researchers. It shows Obama's popularity could also have a big impact on the governor's race. KPLU's Gary Davis explains.


Concerns About New Homeless Veterans (2008-02-22)
What happens when Washington state's deployed soldiers return home? What happens 10 years after that? Or 20? King County social service agencies are trying to join forces to keep returning soldiers healthy and off the streets. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Thiel on Seattle and Sonics (2008-02-22)
Is there any amount of money that would convince the city of Seattle to settle its differences with the Sonics and let them leave town? That's what some people are asking, after the city rejected an offer from the team to buy its way out of the last two years on its Key Arena lease. The mayor is standing firm, and the NBA commissioner is talking tough. It's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Tater Tots: From Cattle Feed to Retro Cache (2008-02-22)
Local food advocates would likely resist adding Tater Tots to their menu of regionally produced foods. But local they are. Those crispy potato nuggets were invented on the Oregon-Idaho border, from what had been cattle feed. Yet, the Tot has transcended its humble origins. It's now appearing in trendy bars and restaurants all over America. KPLU's Guy Hand explains.


Gregoire's Savings Plan Fading Fast (2008-02-21)
Governor Chris Gregoire's plan to leave more than a billion dollars in the state's piggy bank is slipping away. Statehouse Democrats have unveiled a budget revision that saves about half that much. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Microsoft Sharing Trade Secrets (2008-02-21)
Microsoft is sharing information about its technology that once was only available to paying customers. The company wants to make it easier to create software that works with its products. It says the move will also help it resolve a dispute with European regulators. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Municipal Bond Troubles (2008-02-21)
Around this time last year, KPLU financial commentator Greg Heberlein spotted the first warning signs of the sub-prime loan debacle. Now, he's seeing an alarming trend in the world of municipal bonds. He spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Senators, Congressmen Score High on Enviro Report Card (2008-02-21)
A national conservation group's legislative report card gives high marks to Washington's congressional delegation, with two notable exceptions. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Global Health in Washington State (2008-02-21)
President Bush is in Africa, where he's promoting work being done there to improve basic health. A lot of that is made possible by organizations based in Washington State. KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis spoke with Scott Jackson of Seattle-based PATH, a local leader in the field with offices in 20 countries. Jackson says the state has become synonymous with global health.


Some Green Legislation Moves Forward, Some Dies (2008-02-21)
In Olympia, a number of key bills focused on the environment have survived the legislature's mid-session cut-off. Others have quietly died. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has this update on the victims and the survivors


Veterans Lack Care in Washington State (2008-02-21)
Some veterans from the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are turning up homeless on the streets in Northwest cities. Senator Patty Murray is appalled and says she's pumping more money into housing vouchers to help the problem. KPLU's Anna King has more.


Microsoft Goes Open Source (2008-02-21)
Microsoft has posted on the web more than thirty-thousand pages of documentation for its top-selling software products. In the past, that information was only available to licensed developers who paid fees. But the company says it wants to make it easier for a broad community of engineers to create software that works with its products. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Northwesterners Volunteer at 2010 Olympics (2008-02-20)
More than 15-thousand people have signed up to volunteer at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. Applications opened just a week ago. That number includes scores from our side of the Canadian border. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Truck Safety Still a Concern in Washington (2008-02-20)
Last year in Washington State, 67 people died in accidents involving commercial vehicles - including 18-wheelers. A new law in Washington will soon allow State Patrol to track and punish unsafe truckers. In the meantime, troopers have stepped up sting operations. We sent KPLU's Austin Jenkins out to the truck scales to see how the crackdowns are working.


Frenzy in Olympia as Legislative Deadline Looms (2008-02-20)
It's been a frenzied few days in the state legislature. Yesterday afternoon was the deadline for bills to pass out of either the House or Senate. Legislation that doesn't make it is usually dead for the session. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports on what's passing and what's not.


Enviro Legislative Update (2008-02-20)
Halfway through the legislative session in Olympia, environmental groups are feeling the love. All four items at the top of their wish-list have survived the mid-session cut-off and are looking at likely passage. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty ...


Renovations for Popular Forest Service Campgrounds (2008-02-20)
Prioritize and you shall be rewarded. That at least is how it's working right now at the US Forest Service, when it comes to recreation amenities. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Seattle's 'state' Debated (2008-02-19)
Seattle's Mayor says the city's in great shape. But some leaders are worried tough economic times are around the corner and may stall some needed programs. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Northwest Flower and Garden Show Preview (2008-02-19)
The Northwest Flower and Garden show will be celebrating its 20th anniversary when it opens Wednesday in Seattle. KPLU's Liam Moriarty got a peek inside as exhibitors were scrambling to finish their elaborate displays ...


Toxic Clean Up Philanthropy (2008-02-19)
Communities that struggle with big, dirty industries also benefit from corporate philanthropy. The money usually comes from the industries themselves or companies that contract with the industry. Philanthropy experts say the motive for giving is more than generosity. KPLU's Anna King reports on how corporate philanthropy is not unusual for this community, a community built around one of the largest superfund sites in the country.


NW Quilt Makers Comfort Iraq Vets (2008-02-19)
We keep hearing about them... suicides by Iraq War vets. One Northwest woman was so taken by the death of a vet she'd never met, she started a movement. The Vashon Island quilt maker inspired others around the nation to make beautiful blankets to give to wounded soldiers. To date, they have delivered an astonishing two-and-a-half thousand handmade quilts. KPLU's Tom Banse reports the group plans to keep sewing until the Iraq War ends.


Pre-School Kids May Spend More Time in Class (2008-02-19)
Low income pre-school kids in Washington State would spend a lot more time in the classroom under a proposal moving through the legislature. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains the reasoning behind the proposal.


Green Building Workshop (2008-02-19)
Big changes are afoot in the construction trades. Government mandates and consumer demand are making the environment a growing factor in how homes and commercial structures are built. Tonight, contractors and trades people are invited to a workshop to help them get up to speed on green building. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


The Last Polar Bear: A Conversation with Steven Kazlowski (2008-02-18)
The impacts of global warming are being seen most dramatically in the Arctic. Seattle photographer Steven Kazlowski's new book, "The Last Polar Bear: Facing the Truth of a Warming World," presents vivid stories and stunning images of a rapidly-changing ecosystem. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty recently spoke with Kazlowski, who says Arctic wildlife and native people alike are literally on thin ice.


A Bookseller's Novel Approach (2008-02-18)
Seattle almost always ranks near the top in surveys of America's most well-read' cities. One of the measuring sticks is the number of independent booksellers, and the city has a lot of them. Still, their owners have to eke out a living in a market dominated by online-retailers and large chains. On today's Meaning of Work, KPLU's Gary Davis finds out what it takes for one owner to survive.


School Levies On Tuesday (2008-02-18)
Tomorrow's presidential primary election is making a lot of people confused, and mad enough not to vote. School districts are hoping their levies don't get forgotten. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing has more.


Navigating Washington's Primary (2008-02-18)
Washington State voters have until tomorrow (Tuesday) to mail in their ballots for the presidential primary and other local elections - including school levies. Secretary of State Sam Reed is predicting a record 47-percent turnout. But some voters are clearly confused or frustrated or both. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Can McCain Win Washington Voters? (2008-02-15)
Last time they were asked, Washington state Republicans were not crazy for Senator John McCain. He won only one quarter of Republican caucus goers. But now Republicans prepare to vote again in this Tuesday's primary - and the political landscape has changed. Senator McCain is now the clear Republican front-runner. That got KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt wondering, will momentum change the minds of Washington voters?


Flu Season Filling Hospitals (2008-02-15)
Flu season is officially here and although the state health department says it's not an especially bad one this year, some hospitals are struggling to accommodate all the patients. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:16)


Thiel on Clemens Steroid Hearing (2008-02-15)
This week's congressional hearing on steroid use in baseball seemed to yield more questions than answers. Star pitcher Roger Clemens and his former personal trainer told dramatically different stories under oath. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel watched the entire hearing and tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick it doesn't look good for Clemens.


Lawmakers Debate Handcuffing in Schools (2008-02-15)
Should school security officers be allowed to use handcuffs, pepper spray and batons on students? State lawmakers are grappling with that question. The debate comes more than three years after the Kent School District was accused of handcuffing African-American students. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Head of Crime & Toxicology Labs Resigns (2008-02-15)
The head of the state's crime and toxicology labs is resigning. The announcement comes after drunk driving breath tests were tossed out by the courts. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Link Between Free Infant Formula & Breastfeeding (2008-02-15)
Some hospitals in the Northwest have stopped giving new mothers free infant formula. They say the donations undercut efforts to get women to breastfeed their babies. A new study by the Oregon Department of Human Services backs up that claim. KPLU's Cathy Duchamp reports.


Senator Larry Craig Admonished (2008-02-14)
The State Ethics Committee has admonished Senator Larry Craig. The Idaho Republican was arrested last year in a gay sex sting at the Minneapolis airport. The panel's critical letter falls short of a full ethics investigation. Cathy Duchamp reports.


Changes At Starbucks (2008-02-14)
Starbucks stock has fallen on hard times. Howard Schultz is back as C-E-O and is trying to turn the company around. One of the changes he's making will make it more difficult to determine how well the coffee retailer is doing. KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Rick Steves, ACLU Talk Marijuana Reform (2008-02-14)
Seattle travel writer Rick Steves has teamed up with the American Civil Liberties Union on a campaign to reform marijuana laws they say are doing more harm than good. KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports.


Winery Lease Will Help Build Schools (2008-02-14)
Washington State school children will profit from the expansion of an adult-only activity in South Central Washington. The state announced it's leasing vacant hillsides in one of the region's top wine growing areas for new vineyards. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Puget Sound Considers Romney Endorsement (2008-02-14)
At last Saturday's Republican caucuses Mitt Romney walked away with 15 percent of the vote in this state. That was a surprising level of support given that the former Massachusetts governor had already withdrawn from the race. Now, just a few days before the Washington state Primary, Romney is throwing his support behind Senator John McCain. We sent KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt out to find if Puget Sound Republicans are taking the endorsement to heart.


Food for Thought: Romantic Evening at Home (2008-02-14)
Who says you have to go out for that special occasion? Not Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson, as she tells, and then serenades, KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Valentine's Day Music: Love and Love Lost (2008-02-14)
We've compiled a Valentine's Day treat for you on our Web site, kplu.org. KPLU's Nick Morrison and Nick Francis have come up with a list of some of the best jazz love songs AND the best jazz songs about lost love. Nick Morrison talked with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick about why they chose some of the songs they did.


Northwest's Snowpack Good, If It Holds (2008-02-13)
It's no surprise that recent storms have dumped above average snowpack throughout the Northwest. But water experts say it's still too early to know if the white stuff will stick around for use by cities and irrigators this summer. KPLU's Anna King reports.


New Gym Program for Seattle (2008-02-13)
An old school approach to gym class is becoming popular again. The Seattle School District is the latest to embrace the trend that promises to teach kids to be active for a lifetime. More from KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing. Link to the program's funder: www.treeswing.org


ACLU Campaigns to Change Marijuana Laws (2008-02-13)
The legal war on marijuana isn't working and it's time to talk about a better way of dealing with pot use. That's the message of the American Civil Liberties Union's new campaign called, "It's Time for a Conversation." More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty


Adult Family Home Providers Consider Unionizing (2008-02-13)
What do you do when your parents are too old to live on their own, but not sick enough to be in a nursing home? Adult Family Homes are one option. In Washington, the people who operate these homes are locked in a fight over whether to unionize. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Contrasting Portraits of Eco-saboteur (2008-02-13)
The prosecution and defense painted starkly different portraits yesterday (Tues.) of a woman accused of plotting one of the last and costliest attacks by a cell of radical environmentalists. The 32-year-old violin teacher is the first alleged member of the prolific arson ring to take her case before a jury. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on opening statements at the federal courthouse in Tacoma.


Scooping Up Behind Killer Whales (2008-02-13)
In some ways, the Puget Sound's orca whales are very familiar. We've even given them individual names. But there's still a lot we don't know, like where the whales go and what they eat. Now that they're listed as endangered, those have become important questions. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty accompanied a research crew trying to get answers.


Funding For Poor A Hard Sell (2008-02-12)
Washington State has a nearly one-and-a-half billion dollar surplus. But Governor Chris Gregoire wants to hold onto most of that money in case the economy takes a dip. That means lobbyists for the poor are getting turned away at the door. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports on a faltering request for more dental care.


Lawmakers Complain About "Do Nothing" Session (2008-02-12)
The 2008 state legislature has reached its midpoint. Today is day thirty of a sixty day session. Republicans, who are in the minority, have settled upon a theme for the session. It's that Democrats are punting on major issues because this is an election year. KPLU's Austin Jenkins takes a closer look at the minority party's partisan slings and legislative proposals.


The Death of a Gay Partner (2008-02-12)
Yesterday we brought you a remembrance of Rose Hill. The Seattle psychiatrist died last month of breast cancer. In the weeks following Rose's death, her partner Heather Warncke has been struggling to gain control of her legal rights as Rose's spouse. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has the story:


Gregoire Frustrated by President's Hanford Budget (2008-02-12)
Governor Chris Gregoire is headed to Washington, D.C., next week And she says reviving negotiations on cleanup at the Hanford Nuclear site is a top priority. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Suing UW Athletics (2008-02-11)
A woman who says she was raped by a University of Washington football player eight years ago will finally have her day in court. Her case was dismissed by a judge in 2005. Now, an appeals court has ruled there is enough evidence for it to go to trial. More from KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel.


More Relief for Sub-Prime Borrowers (2008-02-11)
More help is available for families facing foreclosure. The nation's largest sub-prime mortgage lender, Countrywide, has announced an agreement with the non-profit ACORN to keep people from losing their homes. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:15)


Weyerhaeuser Slows Down (2008-02-11)
The Weyerhaeuser Company reported lower sales and swung to a loss in its latest operating quarter. You can see the downturn in home construction on the timber giant's bottom line. And they're by no means alone. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Meaning of Work:Thawing the Northwest Chill (2008-02-11)
As the saying goes, two things are certain in life: death and taxes. If (Al- Ma) Alma (Ruben-steen) Rubenstein had her way, the word love would be included in that list. KPLU's Jennifer Wing has the latest installment of the meaning of work.


WA Caucus: Next Step is Primary (2008-02-11)
Record numbers of voters turned out to caucus this weekend in our state. The lack of a clear frontrunner on the Democratic side was a key factor in driving turnout. KPLU's Austin Jenkins takes us inside one cuacus, and looks ahead to Washington's presidential primary on February 19th.


Remembering Rose Hill (2008-02-11)
Last year for Valentines Day, we told you about the self-described undatable Rose Hill. Rose had been diagnosed with a rare form of breast cancer in adolescence. Her unlikely story of finding love in the persistent face of death moved many of you wrote who us. After 10 years with cancer, Rose Hill died this January. She leaves behind her partner Heather, friends, family and a legacy of purposeful living. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has this remembrance:


A Primer on Washington's Caucuses and Primary (2008-02-08)
The leading presidential contenders are blazing trails across the state today ahead of tomorrow's party caucuses, and the state's primary on February 19th. If you find yourself confused about what's at stake with the caucuses and primary, you're not alone. It's a system that confuses even political junkies. KPLU's Gary Davis talks with our regional reporter Tom Banse about how it all works, and what you need to know.


Surge of Flood Disaster Applicants (2008-02-08)
Hundreds of December windstorm and flood victims waited until the last minute to apply for federal disaster assistance. The deadline was the close of business last night. The surge at the end brings to nearly 14-thousand the number of Washington and Western Oregon households and businesses seeking help from FEMA. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Labor Shortage Worries Wine Growers (2008-02-08)
When farmers aren't farming, they're talking about farming. And these days they're talking about whether they will have enough people to harvest their crops. That's what KPLU's Anna King found at a convention of wine grape growers in Kennewick.


Thiel on Seahawks Succession (2008-02-08)
With the announcement this week that Seahawks assistant coach Jim Mora will lead the team starting in 2009, many are wondering how head coach Mike Holmgren's final season is going to play out. It's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Hillary Clinton in Tacoma (2008-02-08)
Senator Hillary Clinton spent her second day campaigning in Washington State. KPLU's Gary Davis was with Clinton at Friday's rally in Tacoma, and has our report.


Guns on Campus? (2008-02-08)
Should people who have concealed weapon permits be allowed to take their guns on college campuses? Gun rights advocates in Washington say yes. They turned out in force yesterday for a legislative hearing. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Obama Draws Huge Seattle Crowd (2008-02-08)
A capacity crowd filled more than 17-thousand seats at Key Arena in Seattle today (Friday), as people turned out to hear presidential hopeful Barack Obama. About three thousand more watched from an overflow area outside. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp was there. (1:09)


WA Caucuses Next in the Spotlight (2008-02-07)
Washington State Republicans and Democrats are both expecting record turnout at precinct caucuses this Saturday. After Super Tuesday's election results, you've no doubt heard the phrase, "It's all about the delegates." KPLU's Tom Banse reports on how this next cache of convention delegates will be awarded.


Low Interest Rates: Time to Refinance? (2008-02-07)
With all the craziness in the housing market these days, does it make sense to re-finance your mortgage, now that interest rates are lower than they've been in years? With more on that, KPLU's John Maynard talks with Richard Hagar, and educator and appraiser based in Seattle.


Seattle Rethinks School Assignments (2008-02-07)
You want your kid to go to school close to home. You want that school to have strong academics. You want that school to be diverse. And maybe you also want that school to have after-school band. Can Seattle Public School parents really have it all? That's the question before the district and the board as KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


Yakama Nation's Black Lodge Singers (2008-02-07)
The Grammy Awards will go ahead as planned this Saturday (Feb 10), despite the writers' strike. The Writers Guild of America has given the go-ahead to script the show. That's good news for an Eastern Washington-based group that's been nominated for an award in the Native American music category. KPLU's Anna King has the story.


NW Cities Plan Airline Network (2008-02-07)
A consultant from Eugene is getting a warm reception for a plan to start airline service to eight smaller Northwest cities, including Olympia and Port Angeles. Flights would feed into a connecting hub in Portland. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Carbon Tax on Vehicles? (2008-02-07)
Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels wants drivers to pay for the cost of global warming. The Mayor and State Senator Ed Murray of Seattle have rolled-out legislation that would tax vehicles based on the amount of carbon they emit. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Yucca Mountain (2008-02-06)
The plan to store radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain could come to a full halt if either Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama are elected to president/ Both democratic candidates say they would squash the Nevada profect. But what does this mean for the Hanford Nuclear Reservation here in Washington? Hanford officials have been planning to send much of the site's highly radioactive waste to the Silver State. KPLU's Anna King takes a closer look at the options.


Food for Thought: No Knead Redux (2008-02-06)
The no-knead bread recipe rides again! And this time Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein both feel the need to knead. Hear all about it on today's Food for Thought.


High Court to Hear Tent City Case (2008-02-06)
The Washington Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case that pits a church's right to minister to the poor against a city's power to regulate land use. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty.


More Streetcars Studied in Seattle (2008-02-05)
The new streetcar between Seattle's South Lake Union and downtown is the first since 1941, when the last one was torn out. Now Seattle is cautiously pondering a city-wide streetcar network. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty .


Can Whales And Wave Energy Coexist? (2008-02-05)
This winter, researchers from Oregon State University are using surveyors' tools to chart the gray whale migration off the Northwest Coast. The goal: to learn if the migration paths run right through the planned locations of wave energy parks. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Nurses Work To Improve Patient Safety (2008-02-05)
Hospitals in Washington State would have to post the number of nurses on duty for patients and their families to see. That's just one element of a landmark patient safety agreement signed yesterday. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Patient Safety Act Would Require Disclosure (2008-02-05)
Too many patients, too few nurses. That's the situation in hospitals across Washington. For years political battles have prevented a solution. But now hospitals and nurses in Washington State have signed a formal agreement to begin to work together. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more.


Helping The Poor Through Salsa (2008-02-05)
Two Oregon women have ambitions to rival the charitable powerhouse that actor Paul Newman built, with his Newman's Own food business. This duo wants to make a difference for the poor globally, by making gourmet salsas locally. The start-up business has just turned its first profit with exotic flavors like Peach Jalapeno and Cherry Pinot Noir Salsa. KPLU's Tom Banse went into the test kitchen.


Bush Budget Boosts and Pares Pet Causes in NW (2008-02-05)
Northwest lawmakers are finding things they like and dislike in the three trillion dollar federal budget that President Bush sent to Capitol Hill yesterday. KPLU's Tom Banse has a sampling.


RealNetworks Partnering with Yahoo (2008-02-04)
Seattle-based RealNetworks is teaming up with Yahoo. The companies announced a strategic partnership that could dramatically expand the online audience for Real's Rhapsody music service. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:13)


Creating Comic Books (2008-02-04)
The comic book industry is dominated by giants such as Marvel and DC. But a husband and wife team of artists in Seattle is finding success outside of the mainstream by publishing their comics on the web. KPLU's Dave Meyer profiles Phil and Kaja Foglio in our weekly series, The Meaning of Work.


State Caucuses Take Spotlight (2008-02-04)
Super Tuesday is tomorrow. Presidential candidates are jockeying to win delegates in twenty states. Washington weighs in four days later its own caucuses on Saturday. With races still close, state voters may have their biggest impact on national politics in recent memory. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


State Caucuses Take Spotlight (2008-02-04)
Super Tuesday is tomorrow. Presidential candidates are jockeying to win delegates in twenty-four states. Washington weighs in four days later with its own caucuses on Saturday. With races still close, state voters may have their biggest impact on national politics in recent memory. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Math Teacher Shortage (2008-02-04)
Math is a difficult subject for a lot of us. It's a headache for students trying to pass the WASL. It's also a thorn in the side of school principals and administrators who hire teachers. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing tells us the hard job of filling math teaching positions is predicted to get more difficult.


Lawmakers Aim to Reduce Drunk Driving Deaths (2008-02-04)
Over the past 25 years, drunk-driving deaths in the Northwest have been cut in jalf, or better. A lot of factors have contributed to this success story. But in recent years, the rate of decline has leveled off. Now, the push is on to get those numbers even lower. Several proposals, some of them controversial, are being debated in the state legislature, as we hear from KPLU's Austin Jenkins.


UW Goes Green (2008-02-04)
Professors and students are excitedly working away on environmental issues in small pockets across the University of Washington. Now the school is looking to connect those labs, offices and classrooms under one common green umbrella. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt explains


Microsoft Would Borrow for Yahoo Bid (2008-02-04)
For the first time in its corporate history, Microsoft would borrow money if its bid to buy Yahoo goes through. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:13)


Senate Budget Committee Projects Deficit (2008-02-01)
Is our state's budget headed for the deep red? A new financial outlook shows the state faces a two-point-five billion dollar budget deficit by 2013. Republicans are leaping upon the numbers as proof that majority Democrats have overspent. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Thiel on 2008 Super Bowl (2008-02-01)
The New England Patriots are looking to stay undefeated for the season when they take on the New York Giants Sunday in the Super Bowl. But Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick that a win on the field won't necessarily win the team any new fans.


One Night Count: Riding the Rolling Shelters (2008-02-01)
As part of the recent One Night Count of the homeless in King County, KPLU' s Liam Moriarty spent the night with a volunteer team riding what have been called Metro's rolling shelters - the Night Owl buses.


Hate Crimes Alert Campaign (2008-02-01)
A spike in anti-gay hate crimes has prompted the King County prosecutor to launch a campaign aimed at raising awareness about the problem. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty


Microsoft Bid for Yahoo Surprising (2008-02-01)
It's an effort to create a more credible and competitive alternative to Google. Microsoft has extended an offer to buy Yahoo - at a price of $44.6 billion dollars. More from KPLU business and labor reporter, Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:21)


Microsoft Details Yahoo Bid (2008-02-01)
Last week, Microsoft disappointed analysts. Despite record revenue growth, it has not shown good returns in the growing business of online search and advertising. That could soon change. Microsoft has offered a whopping $44 billion dollars for the number-two search engine company, Yahoo. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:14)


School Librarians Rally in Olympia (2008-02-01)
It's been a lean decade for school libraries. New numbers from the National Center for Education Statistics show budgets falling almost 30 percent in the past four years. That has school library supporters fighting back. And as KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports, they're starting in Washington state:


New ID Requirements to Cross the Border (2008-01-31)
Are you planning a train, car, or ferry trip to Canada? Make sure to bring your passport, or at least, proof of citizenship. It's a new requirement that takes effect at border crossings today. More from KPLU's Cathy Duchamp.


Community Colleges Look to Student Feedback (2008-01-31)
The board of Washington's community and technical college met today in Olympia today. They talked budget and policy issues .but they also learned a little more about the students that fill their classrooms. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


I-960 Looms Over Legislature (2008-01-31)
It's not exactly "business as usual" at this year's legislative session. Last fall, voters approved Initiative 960 sponsored by anti-tax guru Tim Eyman. Among other things, it allows taxpayers to sign-up for email alerts so they can track the progress of all proposed tax or fee increases. Needless to say it's sending a chill through the Capitol. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Legislature Cool to DUI Check Points (2008-01-31)
Are drunk driving checkpoints constitutional in Washington? Police and prosecutors argue they are. The ACLU says they're not. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Food For Thought: Gracious & Grouchy (2008-01-31)
On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein about two Seattle area chefs with very different personalities.


Foreclosure Prevention Program (2008-01-30)
Mortgage foreclosure rates in the greater Seattle area are much lower than in other cities around the country. Still, it's estimated about twelve hundred families in King County are currently on the brink of losing their homes. A new pilot program from the city of Seattle aims to prevent that. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:39)


City Helping Seattleites Avoid Foreclosure (2008-01-30)
It's not as drastic as in many parts of the country. But King County saw a rise in mortgage foreclosure rates of more than 25 percent last year. The city of Seattle has launched a pilot program to help people facing foreclosure keep their homes. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:06)


King County SIV Woes (2008-01-30)
The subprime loan collapse is causing more shockwaves in the Puget Sound region. King County's four-point-one-billion dollar investment pool could lose up to five percent of its value. The amount of money at risk is higher than previously thought. The problem is with funds known as S-I-Vs. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein explains it to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Hearing on Domestic Partnership Expansion (2008-01-30)
Off-the-wall questions from a lawmaker. A tearful police officer. And talk of deviant behavior. These were the elements yesterday at a legislative hearing on a proposal to expand Washington's Domestic Partnership law. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Advocates, Homeless Pan Encampment Proposal (2008-01-29)
In the past year, city officials in Seattle have stepped-up the practice of sweeping out encampments of homeless people in parks and greenbelts. After protests that campers were displaced without notice and their belongings destroyed, the city agreed to revise the policy. At a hearing last night, officials got an earful from the homeless and their advocates. KPLU's Liam Moriarty was there


America's Edge Campaign (2008-01-29)
Gov. Chris Gregoire is asking the legislature to spend three-million ($3m) dollars to expand apprenticeship programs in aerospace and new technology. She announced the funding at a rally of the Machinists' union in Seattle. They were launching a national campaign on the manufacturing skills gap. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:59)


Bald Eagles Lead Poisoning (2008-01-29)
High levels of lead were found in both of the bald eagles that recently died at Washington State University in Pullman. How the lead got in their system remains a mystery. And it's a growing problem, as we hear from Glenn Mosley.


Columbia and Snake Rivers Infested (2008-01-29)
The Columbia and Snake rivers are Northwest icons, but a new study finds there are lots of foreign critters floating just beneath the surface. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Governor Expanding Aerospace Apprenticeships (2008-01-29)
The Machinists Union is calling for funds to train more young people and revitalize the manufacturing sector in the United States. Washington Governor Christine Gregoire has answered with a three million dollar plan to dramatically expand apprenticeship programs in aerospace. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:59)


Aurora Bridge Suicide Barrier (2008-01-29)
There may be a solution to a tragic problem that's plagued the Aurora Bridge in Seattle since it opened nearly 80 years ago. More from KPLU health & science reporter Gary Davis.


Idaho Nuclear Plant (2008-01-29)
A company controlled by billionaire investor Warren Buffett has abondoned plans to build a nuclear power plant near the Idaho-Oregon border. The move eliminates one of two commercial nuclear plants proposed in Southwest Idaho. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Making Police Accountable (2008-01-29)
Police misconduct in Seattle isn't getting the scrutiny it needs. That's the assessment of a new report. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has more on the findings of a high profile committee looking into police accountability.


Meaning of Work: Teen Worker (2008-01-28)
When you're a kid your job is to go to school. But teenagers sometimes straddle both the work world and the world of high school. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt introduces us to the latest and youngest worker in our series:


Meaning of Work: Teen Worker (2008-01-28)
When you're a kid your job is to go to school. But teenagers sometimes straddle both the work world and the world of high school. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt introduces us to the latest and youngest worker in our series:


Meaning of Work: Teen Worker (2008-01-28)
When you're a kid your job is to go to school. But teenagers sometimes straddle both the work world and the world of high school. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt introduces us to the latest and youngest worker in our series:


55 MPH Speed Limit Resurfaces (2008-01-28)
Freeway drivers take note. An old idea for saving gas is resurfacing as a response to global warming. Environmentalists in Washington State and California are lobbying to bring back the 55 mile-per-hour highway speed limit. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Meaning of Work: Teen Worker (2008-01-28)
When you're a kid your job is to go to school. But teenagers sometimes straddle both the work world and the world of high school. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt introduces us to the latest and youngest worker in our series:


Gay Marriage: Long Term Fight (2008-01-28)
Gay rights advocates in Washington have a bold goal: legalize same-sex marriage within a decade. But behind-the-scenes, there's a debate over how to achieve that goal. The current strategy is to take incremental steps each year. But some in the gay community would like to see a more direct approach. Meanwhile, one vocal opponent of gay marriage wants to mobilize now. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Thiel on Holmgren Staying (2008-01-25)
Mike Holmgren announced this week that he will stay on as head coach of the Seahawks for one more season. He wants to take the team to the Super Bowl again. And he's already making some changes to try to make that happen. Are there more changes in store in the off-season? It's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


State Fights Exxon Over Spill Damages (2008-01-25)
Almost two decades after a massive oil spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound, Exxon Mobil Corporation still hasn't paid damages awarded to people hurt by the catastrophe. The company wants the U-S Supreme Court to throw out a damage settlement. Now Washington State has joined the fight to make Exxon pay. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Stimulus Package Gets Local Reaction (2008-01-25)
News of the economic stimulus package President Bush and Congressional democrats are proposing met with mixed reviews among people on the streets of Seattle, as KPLU's Gary Davis found out.


Storm Waves: Problem Mounting? (2008-01-25)
For a lot of us, it would be a dream to own a second home on the Washington or Oregon Coast. But for some people who've achieved that dream, it's turning into a headache this winter. Pounding storms are eroding and flooding beachfront property. Weather buoy records going back more than two decades show winter storm wave heights steadily rising on the Northwest Coast. KPLU's Tom Banse visited coastal residents who want to know why this is happening.


ACORN Opens Prosperity Centers (2008-01-25)
Low-income families and individuals struggling to make ends meet have a new resource in three counties. The non-profit ACORN has opened what they're calling prosperity centers - to help more people get tax returns and other benefits they're entitled to, but might not know about. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:07)


Thiel on Holmgren Staying (2008-01-25)
Mike Holmgren announced this week that he will stay on as head coach of the Seahawks for one more season. He wants to take the team to the Super Bowl again. And he's already making some changes to try to make that happen. Are there more changes in store in the off-season? It's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


More Homeless Found in One Night Count (2008-01-25)
The annual overnight count of the homeless in King County found nearly 14 percent more people than last year sleeping outdoors. KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports


Debate Over Wells Heats Up in WA (2008-01-25)
People who drill wells for a living descended on the State Capitol yesterday. They're concerned that environmental groups want a moratorium on new water wells, as a way to slow development. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Storm Waves: Problem Mounting? (2008-01-25)
For a lot of us, it would be a dream to own a second home on the Washington or Oregon Coast. But for some people who've achieved that dream, it's turning into a headache this winter. Pounding storms are eroding and flooding beachfront property. Weather buoy records going back more than two decades show winter storm wave heights steadily rising on the Northwest Coast. KPLU's Tom Banse visited coastal residents who want to know why this is happening.


Storm Waves: Problem Mounting? (2008-01-25)
For a lot of us, it would be a dream to own a second home on the Washington or Oregon Coast. But for some people who've achieved that dream, it's turning into a headache this winter. Pounding storms are eroding and flooding beachfront property. Weather buoy records going back more than two decades show winter storm wave heights steadily rising on the Northwest Coast. KPLU's Tom Banse visited coastal residents who want to know why this is happening.


Thiel on Holmgren Staying (2008-01-25)
Mike Holmgren announced this week that he will stay on as head coach of the Seahawks for one more season. He wants to take the team to the Super Bowl again. And he's already making some changes to try to make that happen. Are there more changes in store in the off-season? It's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Are Performance Audits Working? (2008-01-24)
It's been a little over two years since Washington voters passed Initiative 900 - spearheaded by anti-tax guru Tim Eyman. It authorizes and funds performance audits of state and local government agencies. So far State Auditor Brian Sonntag has completed nine performance audits and recommended more than three-billion-dollars in savings. KPLU's Austin Jenkins recently sat down with Sonntag to find out what impact, if any, his report cards are having on government.


Are Performance Audits Working? (2008-01-24)
It's been a little over two years since Washington voters passed Initiative 900 - spearheaded by anti-tax guru Tim Eyman. It authorizes and funds performance audits of state and local government agencies. So far State Auditor Brian Sonntag has completed nine performance audits and recommended more than three-billion-dollars in savings. KPLU's Austin Jenkins recently sat down with Sonntag to find out what impact, if any, his report cards are having on government.


Are Performance Audits Working? (2008-01-24)
It's been a little over two years since Washington voters passed Initiative 900 - spearheaded by anti-tax guru Tim Eyman. It authorizes and funds performance audits of state and local government agencies. So far State Auditor Brian Sonntag has completed nine performance audits and recommended more than three-billion-dollars in savings. KPLU's Austin Jenkins recently sat down with Sonntag to find out what impact, if any, his report cards are having on government.


Canadian Orca Whale Reserve Threatened? (2008-01-24)
Last summer, a fuel tanker truck and other heavy equipment fell off a barge into an orca whale reserve in British Columbia. The resulting nine-mile-long diesel fuel slick dissipated within a few days. But how much of a threat does the machinery still pose, sitting under a thousand feet of water? More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Are Performance Audits Working? (2008-01-24)
It's been a little over two years since Washington voters passed Initiative 900 - spearheaded by anti-tax guru Tim Eyman. It authorizes and funds performance audits of state and local government agencies. So far State Auditor Brian Sonntag has completed nine performance audits and recommended more than three-billion-dollars in savings. KPLU's Austin Jenkins recently sat down with Sonntag to find out what impact, if any, his report cards are having on government.


Orca Recovery Plan Takes Go-Slow Approach (2008-01-24)
Federal wildlife managers have a new plan to help the recovery of the Puget Sound's endangered orca whales. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story.


Recession? (2008-01-24)
Has the recession begun? We saw a big rate cut by the Federal Reserve and more wild swings on Wall Street this week. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein explains the latest turmoil to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Brush Pickers Ruling (2008-01-23)
An update now to a story we brought you last summer. The sState has lost another court fight in its battle to regulate the brush-picking industry. More from KPLU's Austin Jenkins.


Air Passenger Rights (2008-01-23)
Have you ever been stuck on a plane, on the ground for several hours? If so, State lawmakers feel your pain. They're considering an airline passenger "bill of rights." But the airlines don't like it. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Madeleine Albright in Seattle (2008-01-23)
Former United States Secretary of State Madeleine Albright has been touring the country with a new book. Memo to the President Elect is a foreign policy primer for our nation's next leader. She spoke about it to the greater Seattle Chamber. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp was there. (1:17)


Underwater Investigation in B.C. Diesel Spill (2008-01-23)
Investigators in a small submarine have located heavy logging equipment that slid off a barge into an orca whale reserve in British Columbia last summer. Now, Canadian officials and environmentalists are waiting for a report on the machinery still lying under a thousand feet of water. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has this update


Border ID's (2008-01-23)
On January 31st, a driver's license and a smile won't be enough to cross into the US from Canada. You'll need proof of citizenship. That could be a passport. Now, some cheaper alternatives to a passport are available. KPLU's Tom Banse has details.


Food for Thought: All You Can Eat Oysters (2008-01-23)
Wehn it comes to oysters, "All you can eat" is a phrase that Nancy Leson takes seriously, as the Seattle Times restaurant critic relates to KPLU's Dick Stein, on today's Food for Thought.


Memo to the President Elect (2008-01-23)
Madeleine Albright was the first woman to serve as U.S. Secretary of State. Now she's advising businesses on global strategy. And she has a new book out that's she's written for the next president of the United States. She spoke about it to the Greater Seattle Chamber. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has highlights. (2:00)


Air Passenger Rights (2008-01-23)
Have you ever been stuck on a plane, on the ground for several hours? If so, State lawmakers feel your pain. They're considering an airline passenger "bill of rights." But the airlines don't like it. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Real Estate Market Strong in 2007 (2008-01-23)
Despite all the scary economic news, it turns out 2007 wasn't such a bad year for the region's real estate market. Though at a slower pace, median prices for Puget Sound area homes continued to go up last year. More from KPLU Business and Labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Hip-Hop Debate Team (2008-01-23)
Students have been honing their academic and public speaking skills in school debate clubs for decades. But over the past few years, the style of debate in cities like Seattle and Tacoma has been evolving. As Chana Joffe-Walt shows us, debate is starting to sound and look different:


Air Passenger Rights (2008-01-23)
Have you ever been stuck on a plane, on the ground for several hours? If so, State lawmakers feel your pain. They're considering an airline passenger "bill of rights." But the airlines don't like it. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


King County Celebrates Local Hip Hop (2008-01-22)
Many of you spent the weekend in some way honoring the legacy of Martin Luther King. In Tacoma and Seattle African-American communities gathered to honor Dr. King by honoring local hip-hop talent. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes us there


Pursuing MLK's Dream (2008-01-22)
The recent murders of two teenagers has rocked a Seattle Community. Both young men were African American. Bothe were the victims of late night gun shots. Just last summer, a grassroots group formed to try and stop this sort of violence. It calls itself the Black on Black Crime Coalition. Larry Evans is one of the founders. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel sat down with him in his office.


Turning Terns from Columbia River (2008-01-22)
Remember those Caspian terns that gobble up threatened baby at the mouth of the Columbia River? The Army Corps of Engineers wants to entice some of them to relocate hundreds of miles away. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from Eugene, Oregon on the first of six new nesting islands.


Talk of Universal Healthcare in Legislature (2008-01-22)
The state legislature is in a short, sixty-day session. But that's not stopping lawmakers, and the state's insurance commissioner, from proposing sweeping healthcare reform. Nothing major is expected to pass this year, but sponsors are laying the groundwork for next year. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Campaign Train Supporters for Caucus (2008-01-22)
Voters in Washington and Idaho caucus in February. The hot contests for president promise to draw a lot of first time caucus goers. So, party committees and various campaigns are teaching people how to caucus. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Iraqi Interpreter (2008-01-22)
The Bush administration has vowed to resettle 12-thousand Iraqi refugees in the United States by next Fall. But that goal is proving difficult to meet, in large part because of extensive background checks. A handful of Iraqi refugees have cut through the federal bureaucracy and now make their homes in the Northwest. KPLU's Anna King brings us the story of a former Iraqi interpreter, whose life was turned upside down by a bomb.


Washington Film Office Evolving (2008-01-22)
From quirky independents to mainstream commercials and blockbuster features, filmmaking is big business - and states all over the country compete for it. In Washington, a new non-profit organization has been doling out incentives to lure more film crews here. And it may soon expand. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (2:00)


Reacting to World Economic Jitters (2008-01-22)
The jittery world economic news is on the minds of people here in the Northwest. We sent KPLU Reporter Paula Wissel out to do some random sampling on the streets of Seattle.


The Meaning of Work -- High on the Job (2008-01-21)
Almost anywhere you look, construction tower cranes have popped up. Ever glance up and wonder who in their right mind would work in one of those things? KPLU's Liam Moriarty did. Today, in our series The Meaning of Work, Liam introduces us to a man who spends his workday 200 feet in the air


Lots Happening MLK Day (2008-01-20)
Tomorrow is a day off for a lot of you. But KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes us on a tour of what's going on:


Pursuing King's Dream (2008-01-20)
The recent murders of two teenagers has rocked a Seattle community. Both young men were African American. Both were the victims of late night gun shots. Just last summer, a grassroots group formed to try and stop this sort of violence. It calls itself the Black on Black Crime Coalition. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel sat down with one its founders, Larry Evans.


Bogus Checks (2008-01-18)
People at all income and education levels throughout Washington are receiving bogus check and money order offers that, if they bite, will definitely cost them money and could land them in federal prison. One victim offered her tale of woe during an Attorney General news conference in Spokane. John Vlahocich reports.


Parmaceutical Data Mining (2008-01-18)
State lawmakers are considering a crackdown on pharmaceuticl companies. Majority Democrats are especialy concerned about two issues: gift giving to doctors and datamining on what drugs doctors are prescribing. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


2008 Technology Forecast (2008-01-18)
This may be the year that you get a much faster Internet connection in your home. Mark Anderson is publisher of Strategic News Service, a newsletter for the telecommunications and computing industries. He shares some of his predictions for 2008 with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Students March in Honor of Martin Luther King (2008-01-18)
Students from 5 Capitol Hill schools walked through Seattle's Volunteer Park today. They were on a Social Justice March organized in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes us there.


BPA Improves Efficiencies (2008-01-18)
Enough power to light up 50-thousand homes. That's the amount of energy Bonneville Power Administration says it saves through conservation. KPLU's Anna King explains.


Students March in Honor of Martin Luther King (2008-01-18)
Students from 5 Capitol Hill schools walked through Seattle's Volunteer Park today. They were on a Social Justice March organized in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes us there.


Thiel on Holmgren's Future (2008-01-18)
Now that the Seahawks season is over, head coach Mike Holmgren is spending the next few days deciding whether he wants to come back for at least one more year. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick that Holmgren didn't give many clues this week as to which way he was leaning.


Students March in Honor of Martin Luther King (2008-01-18)
Students from 5 Capitol Hill schools walked through Seattle's Volunteer Park today. They were on a Social Justice March organized in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes us there.


Random Drug Testing Summit (2008-01-17)
Random drug testing for students. It's a plan backed by the Bush Administration but opposed by some leading health and civil liberties groups. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Be Prepared! (2008-01-17)
Will there be a recession this year? The economy appears to be on shaky ground these days. KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein about planning for the possibility of hard times ahead.


WaMu Losing Money (2008-01-17)
Hurt badly by the sinking value of its mortgage portfolio, Seattle-based Washington Mutual has reported a fourth-quarter loss of more than $1.8 billion dollars - its first quarterly loss in more than a decade. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has details. (1:51)


Foster Care Back to Court (2008-01-17)
It's been three-and-a-half years since the State of Washington settled a class action lawsuit over foster care. Now, the plantiffs in Braam vs. Washington are taking the state back to court for "egregious non-compliance." KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Gregoire Delivers State of State (2008-01-16)
Governor Chris Gregoire delivered a rosy State of the State address last night, her last before she hits the campaign trail seeking re-election. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Boeing Delays Dreamliner - Again (2008-01-16)
Boeing's credibility is shot. That's the word from analysts after the company ended weeks of speculation and confirmed a three-month delay of the 787 Dreamliner's inaugural flight. First delivery has been pushed back to early next year. It's the third announced delay since the program began. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (2:13)


Food For Thought: Special Occasion Dining (2008-01-16)
Planning a special occasion dinner out? Sometimes the best plan is no plan, as Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Toxic Toy Legislation (2008-01-16)
There is a growing movement in Washington State to prevent children from being exposed to harmful chemicals and lead. Everyone from lawmakers to doctors are concerned. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


Food For Thought: Special Occasion Dining (2008-01-16)
Planning a special occasion dinner out? Sometimes the best plan is no plan, as Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Boeing Dreamliner Delayed for 3rd Time (2008-01-16)
Rumors that were started earlier this week by the Wall Street Journal have been confirmed. Boeing is delaying first flight of the new 787 Dreamliner another three months, till June of this year. First delivery is pushed back till early 2009. More from KPLU business and labor reporter, Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:09)


Odd Bills in the State Legislature (2008-01-16)
The state legislature is just two days into its 60-day session. But already, lawmakers have introduced nearly 500 bills. Many are deadly boring, but some jump out as radical or odd or just plain funny. KPLU's Austin Jenkins culled through the list and reports on some of his favorites.


Food for Thought: Special Occasion Dining (2008-01-16)
Planning a special occasion dinner out? Sometimes the best plan is no plan, as Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Gregoire Delivers State of State (2008-01-16)
Governor Chris Gregoire delivered a rosy State of the State address last night, her last before she hits the campaign trail seeking re-election. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Food For Thought: Special Occasion Dining (2008-01-16)
Planning a special occasion dinner out? Sometimes the best plan is no plan, as Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Historic Hat Store Looks to Change (2008-01-15)
More and more stores like Target, Walmart, even Safeway try to deliver all your consumer needs in one convenient place. Not so in a downtown Seattle shop. Byrnie Utz has been selling hats - only hats - on 3rd and Union since 1934. But 2008 may be its last year on that corner. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has the story:


Hormones and Breast Cancer Study (2008-01-15)
Women who take a combination of hormones to ease the symptoms of menopause may be at a higher risk for a certain form of breast cancer. The findings by researchers at Seattle's Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center are both alarming and hopeful, as KPLU health & science reporter Gary Davis explains.


Property Tax Opponents Rally (2008-01-15)
The 2008 State legislative session is underway. Lawmakers formally convened yesterday for a short, sixty-day session. Inside the Capitol there was a lot of pomp and circumstance. While outside, fed-up homeowners railed against skyrocketing property taxes. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Satellite Will Track Carbon Sources (2008-01-15)
Does the Northwest produce more of a key global warming gas than its plant life absorbs? An upcoming satellite launch promises an answer. The satellite will track sources and "sinks" of heat-trapping carbon dioxide, all from an orbit hundreds of miles above the earth. In Pullman, KPLU's Tom Banse talked to a scientist involved with the project.


State-Of-The-State: Gregoire Vs Rossi (2008-01-15)
Governor Chris Gregoire will deliver her state-of-the-state address this afternoon. But last night Republican challenger Dino Rossi attempted to upstage the sitting Governor. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Clearwire Partners with Google (2008-01-15)
Wireless pioneer Craig McCaw's latest venture has received a boost. His Kirkland-based Internet service provider, Clearwire, is teaming up with Google. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:03)


Some Business Wary of Global Warming Bill (2008-01-14)
Washington State has set a goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions to half of 1990 levels by the year 2050. Now, Governor Gregiore is pushing legislation designed to boost the economic transition to a green future. Environmental groups are gung-ho, but some businesses are wary. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Historic Hat Store Looks for Change (2008-01-14)
More and more stores like Target, Walmart, even Safeway try to deliver all your consumer needs in one convenient place. Not so in a downtown Seattle shop. Byrne Utz has been selling hats - only hats - on 3rd and Union since 1934. But 2008 may be its last year on that corner. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has the story:


Border Conference (2008-01-14)
International borders help keep countries safe and secure. But what about their impact on culture, communities and families? A group of academics is gathering in Bellingham (Monday) to explore how borders change people's lives. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has more.


Health Care Costs Debated (2008-01-14)
The state's biggest health insurers are disputing a new report that claims they cover fewer people as their profits rise. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


MySpace Agreement (2008-01-14)
Protecting kids online is a challenge. A new agreement between Washington state and the social networking site, MySpace aims to make the internet a little safer. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


Legislature Convenes (2008-01-14)
The State legislature is convening for a 60-day session. There's one-party Democratic rule, and a $1.4 billion surplus. But with Governor Chris Gregoire up for re-election, you might say the theme of this session is "get in, get out, nobody gets hurt politically." KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Cashing in on the Housing Crisis (2008-01-14)
Today on The Meaning of Work we meet a man who's figured out a way to cash in on the housing crisis. Christopher Hall of Kirkland has built a business around buying up homes being lost to foreclosure. KPLU's Paula Wissel has his story.


Session Starts (2008-01-14)
The 2008 session of the State legislature starts today. It's a short, 60-day session this year. And lawmakers have the fall election on their minds as they convene. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Gregiore Pushes New Climate Change Bill (2008-01-14)
As Washington's legislature reconvenes, Governor Chris Gregoire is rolling out the first steps in her drive to dramatically cut the state's contribution to global warming. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


The Meaning of Work - Cashing in on Housing Crisis (2008-01-13)
Today on The Meaning of Work we meet a man who's figured out a way to cash in on the housing crisis. Christopher Hall of Kirkland has built a business around buying up homes being lost to foreclosure. KPLU's Paula Wissel has his story.


Tornado Touches Down in Vancouver, WA (2008-01-11)
People who live in Vancouver, Washington are assessing the damage after a rare tornado touched-down yesterday afternoon. It was destructive, but caused no major injuries. More from KPLU's Tom Banse.


Thiel on Seahawks vs. Packers (2008-01-11)
Lambeau Field in Green Bay is the site of Saturday's playoff game between the Seahawks and Packers. It's familiar turf for Seahawks coach Mike Holmgren and quarterback Matt Hasselbeck. But Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel says Lambeau Field is NOT the hallowed ground that many make it out to be. He tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick the Seahawks have more of an advantage than many people realize, despite all the hype about Packers star quarterback Brett Favre.


Western States Gather to Discuss Climate Change (2008-01-10)
The conversation about how to respond to global climate change on a regional level gets down to brass tacks today (Thurs.) in Portland. Representatives of western states and provinces have gathered to design a cap-and-trade system to reduce greenhouse gas pollution. What's cap-and-trade mean? KPLU's Tom Banse sat down with Janice Adair to find out. The Olympia woman chairs the Western Climate Initiative.


Feds to Consider Endangered Listings (2008-01-10)
The federal government announced this week that it will consider endangered species protection for the pygmy rabbit. The smallest of our native rabbits is struggling to survive across eight Western states. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


USOC Cracks Down on Olympic Penninsula Winery (2008-01-10)
There are more than a thousand businesses in Washington State with the word Olympic in their names. But in the age of the internet, that local geographic reference can cause problems with a certain international athletic movement. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on a small winery accused of trademark infringement by the US Olympic Committee.


Gregiore Proposes Tolls to Pay for 520 Bridge (2008-01-10)
Rebuilding the 520 floating bridge will require tolls starting next year - and maybe tolls on the I-90 bridge as well. That's the message from Governor Chris Gregiore. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Couple Pleads Not Guilt in Carnation Killings (2008-01-10)
The couple accused of killing 6 family members on Christmas Eve in Carnation were arraigned in Seattle today. Both pleaded not guilty. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt was there:


2007 NW Stocks (2008-01-10)
2007 was a rough year on Wall Street. The broader market showed modest gains for the year, but Northwest stocks lost ground. KPLU's Dave Meyer looks at the numbers with financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Clear-cut Picture Triggers Debate (2008-01-10)
A single newspaper photograph has triggered a debate over logging practices in the Northwest. The photo shows a clear-cut hillside that slid into a creek during last month's Pineapple Express storms. Mud and debris in streams and rivers helped contribute to devastating record floods in Southwest Washington. A University of Washington professor and a Weyerhaeuser faced-off Thursday. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports from Olympia.


Debate over Term "Assisted Suicide" (2008-01-10)
Former Washington Governor Booth Gardner yesterday filed a right-to-die ballot measure with the Secretary of State. It's closely modeled on Oregon's Death with Dignity Act. Already there's a fight over the use of the term assisted suicide. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Farms Getting Back on Their Feet (2008-01-09)
The number of Western Washington and Oregon households and businesses that have applied for federal disaster assistance has crossed the 11-thousand mark. The area hit by last month's floods and mudslides includes an unusual concentration of small family farms and dairies. KPLU's Tom Banse reports some are bouncing back quickly. On other farms, it looks like the disaster might have happened just yesterday.


Right To Die Initiative (2008-01-09)
Washington is about to become the next battleground in the debate over assisted suicide. Former Governor Booth Gardner is introducing a "right-to-die" ballot measure. It's closely modeled on Oregon's Death with Dignity Act. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Spam King (2008-01-09)
Remember the arrest last spring of the man dubbed the Spam King? He'll be back in court this morning. More charges are being filed against him. It got us wondering. What about that promise that cracking down on him would lead to a lot less spam in our inboxes? Here's KPLU Reporter Paula Wissel.


Put Your Money in Stocks (2008-01-09)
Anyone who watches the stock market knows that this year is off to a very turbulent start. But one local expert advised a roomful of Seattle leaders to put their money into stocks. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.(1:14)


Food for Thought: Having it Your Way (2008-01-09)
Having it your way is no longer a luxury in restaurants. These days, it's practically an obligation, as Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson explains to KPLU's Dick Stein, on today's Food for Thought.


Local Expert Predicts No Recession (2008-01-09)
The credit crunch caused by the sub-prime mortgage mess, increasing national unemployment numbers and the high price of oil have many analysts talking about a possible recession. But one local expert says, don't panic. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:11)


Reports Say Housing For Chronic Homeless Works (2008-01-09)
Two experimental projects to house the chronically homeless have released reports that show they seem to be improving lives - and saving taxpayers money. KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports.


Sobriety Checkpoints Coming to WA? (2008-01-08)
Washington, Oregon, and Idaho are among 11 states that don't allow DUI roadblocks. But that may soon change in Washington. The Governor and lawmakers are pushing legislation that would allow police to set-up sobriety checkpoints. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Liability Blues (2008-01-08)
State Attorney General Rob McKenna is on a one-man crusade. He says the state is too exposed to lawsuits and it's costing taxpayers tens-of-millions of dollars a year. McKenna wants the Legislature to re-impose some cloak of immunity for the state, making Washington more like Oregon and Idaho. But so far lawmakers aren't biting. That could be because trial lawyers are howling. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Landlords & Tenants: Know Your Rights (2008-01-08)
If you're a landlord, do you know your rights? If you rent, do you know yours? In our real estate commentary, John Maynard talks with Richard Hagar, a Seattle-based educator and appraiser.


Port of Seattle Hears Public Comments on Audit (2008-01-08)
The Port of Seattle held its public hearing on the state audit that found potential fraud and waste of more than 97 million taxpayer dollars. As KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp explains, the meeting attracted supporters as well as critics. (2:16)


King County Gears Up For Saving Puget Sound (2008-01-08)
The new state agency charged with putting Puget Sound on the road to health has until next fall to come up with a plan. Meanwhile, King County is taking steps to align its Puget Sound restoration efforts with the larger regional goals. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Starbucks Ousts CEO (2008-01-07)
Starbucks says it's part of new strategic initiatives to increase shareholder value. The company has fired CEO Jim Donald and returned control of the coffee chain to Chairman Howard Schultz. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:05)


The Man Behind the Curtain (2008-01-07)
The movie business is full of million-dollar budgets, star-studded glamour, and the magic of captivating story lines that take you away from your everyday life.


Feds Investigating Port of Seattle (2008-01-07)
The U.S. Justice Department has launched a criminal investigation of the Port of Seattle. It's the result of last month's report from the state auditor that found potential fraud and waste of nearly a hundred million taxpayer dollars. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:13)


Recruiting Small Town Docs (2008-01-07)
There's a shortage of rural doctors in Washington. Now the small wheat farming town of Colfax has come up with a clever solution to the problem of recruiting doctors to rural areas. The community hospital and some of its doctors are paying a local woman's way through medical school. The med student has committed to return to her hometown to practice after completing her studies. KPLU's Tom Banse reports how it pencils out.


Weekend Food for Kids (2008-01-07)
Students at Tacoma's MacArver Elementary may be returning to school today with full stomachs. Several dozen are part of a new program that distributes backpacks full of food to low-income students over the weekend. KPLU's Education Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


Seahawks Beat Redskins in NFL Playoffs (2008-01-05)
The National Football League playoffs got under way in Seattle on Saturday. The Seahawks and Washington Redskins squared off at Qwest Field. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Navy Sonar Ruling Could Impact Northwest Waters (2008-01-04)
A federal court ruling that limits the use of a type of Navy sonar believed to harm whales could have implications in the Northwest. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Thiel on Seahawks vs. Redskins (2008-01-04)
The Seahawks start their playoff run Saturday against the Washington Redskins at Qwest Field. The match-up looks pretty even on paper, but Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick it's the intangibles that Seahawks fans have to worry about.


Public Housing Door Signs OK (2008-01-04)
The State Supreme Court has ruled that residents of Seattle public housing projects have the right to choose what they put on the doors of their homes. The ruling was in response to a Seattle Housing Authority ban on door hangings. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes a look at the issue - starting in Seattle's Yesler Terrace:


Crackdown on Foreclosure Scams (2008-01-04)
You know the saying: they kick you when you're down. That's what crooks are doing to people facing foreclosure on their homes. It's called a foreclosure rescue scam. And State Attorney General Rob McKenna says it's time for a crackdown. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


2007 is Banner Year for Boeing (2008-01-04)
Washington's largest employer is flying high. Boeing reports it had a record number of orders last year. Deliveries are up as well. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:11)


Imperium Renewables Pulls IPO (2008-01-03)
One of the state's most-promising start-ups is showing more signs of trouble. Seattle-based Imperium Renewables, which operates a huge biodiesel plant in Hoquiam, is delaying its initial public offering of stock. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:11)


Eyman's Next Ballot Measure? Traffic Jams (2008-01-03)
Washington initiative King Tim Eyman is back. This time around he wants to tackle traffic jams. Eyman proposes to put a measure on the November ballot that would earmark money for reducing congestion on Washington roads. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Fred Russell Sentancing (2008-01-03)
Fred Russell has received the maximum penalty allowed under the law in connections with the car crash that killed three WSU students in 2001. Reporter Glenn Mosley has more.


Fred Russell Sentence (2008-01-03)
Fred Russell has received the maximum penalty allowed under the law in connections with the car crash that killed three WSU students in 2001. Reporter Glenn Mosley has more.


Fred Russell Sentancing (2008-01-03)
Fred Russell has received the maximum penalty allowed under the law in connections with the car crash that killed three WSU students in 2001. Reporter Glenn Mosley has more.


Seattle Expanding Red Light Cameras (2008-01-03)
Thinking of trying to beat that yellow light before it turns red? Think again. Seattle is installing more automatic cameras to nab drivers who run red lights. KPLU's Liam Moriarty has the story.


Nuclear Plant Interest Gains (2008-01-02)
The Northwest is not immune to the renewed interest in nuclear power. Two different companies have come forward with plans for commercial nuclear reactors to serve the region. Both propose to put a nuke plant in rural southwest Idaho. Why Idaho? KPLU's Tom Banse went looking for answers.


Farmers Should Have Water This Summer (2008-01-02)
A wet winter should translate into a good summer for farmers in Eastern Washington. Enough rain and snow have fallen to start filling-up mountian reservoirs and there's a good base of snowpack. KPLU's Anna King has more.


Study: Ph.Ds Need More Skills (2008-01-02)
Graduate programs take years to teach students everything they need to know about their discipline. But a new study from the University of Washington says graduate programs need to teach students even more. Not just how to be scholars but how to live in the real world. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


More Red Light Cameras in Seattle (2008-01-02)
Drivers in Seattle will soon have 24 new reasons to slow down when the traffic light turns yellow. That's the number of new cameras that'll be set up at key intersections to catch drivers who run red lights. KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports


Food for Thought: Bake Your Own Bread (2008-01-02)
The price of bread is going up. On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein attempt to encourage those with a fear of baking.


State Sues EPA (2008-01-02)
Washington is joining other states in suing the Bush Administration over auto emissions. The state wants the right to enact tougher standards. KPLU's Paula Wissel explains.


Russell Sentencing (2008-01-02)
Former Washington State University student Fred Russell was sentenced Wednesday on three counts of vehicular homicide. Russell's case gained international noteriety after he fled to Irelend to escape prosecution. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Texting While Driving Ban (2008-01-01)
Here's a worth New Year's resolution: I will stop text messaging while driving. It might save you a ticket. That's because tomorrow Washington becomes the first state in the nation to outlaw driving while texting. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Thiel on 2007 in Review (2007-12-28)
It's been quite a year for sports in Washington state. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel take a look back at some of the stories that won't end at the end of the year.


Geothermal Energy (2007-12-28)
Electricity is flowing from the first geothermal power plant to go online in the Northwest. The Southern Idaho plant is probably the first of many, judging from the the number of Northwest utilities that say they're interested in "getting into hot water." Local geothermal developers say their flavor of alternative energy has become cost-competitive. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Saving Your Tax Refund (2007-12-27)
It's the end of the year and time to start thinking about taxes. The I-R-S recently began offering new ways to deliver your tax refund. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein explains them to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Bad Behavior in Restaurants (2007-12-26)
It may surprise you to learn that restaurant diners are not always on their very best behavior. Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson recalls some memorable examples from her waitressing days for KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought


Sun Valley Ski Area Expansion Approved (2007-12-26)
Sun Valley is having better luck than ski areas in Oregon and Washington getting its expansion plans approved. Two federal agencies just recently signed off on upgrades at the Idaho ski resort.


Thiel on Mitchell Report Fallout (2007-12-21)
Reaction continues to pour in following the release of the Mitchell Report on the use of performance-enhancing drugs in Major League Baseball. It's the topic of conversation this week between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Salmon-Safe Christmas Trees (2007-12-21)
You've strung energy-saving LED holiday lights, you're using recycled gift wrap and you're got an organic, free-range turkey in the oven. But is your tree environmentally-friendly? KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty looks at one more way to have a Green Christmas.


Full Steam Ahead for Geothermal Energy (2007-12-21)
Electricity is flowing from the first geothermal power plant to go online in the Northwest. The southern Idaho plant is probably the first of many judging from the number of Northwest utilities who say they're interested in getting into hot water. Local geothermal developers say their flavor of alternative energy has become cost-competitive.


Georgia Pacific Bellingham Closes Last Mill (2007-12-21)
It's the end of an era for Bellingham, but also the start of something new. The Georgia Pacific paper mill shrink-wrapped its final rolls of toilet tissue in the wee hours of this morning. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:13)


State Audit Slams Port of Seattle (2007-12-21)
A state audit of the Port of Seattle finds the organization sorely lacking in oversight and effective management. The audit reports 97.2 million dollars has been wasted in unnecessary costs. Chana Joffe-Walt has the story:


Protest Against Sweeps of Homeless Encampments (2007-12-20)
About a hundred homeless people and their supporters rallied at Seattle's City Hall last night. They called for an end to the city's policy of clearing homeless encampments in parks and greenbelts, and destroying the campers' belongings. KPLU's Liam Moriarty has more


WA To Join EPA Lawsuit (2007-12-20)
Several states, including Washington, are lining up to sue the Bush Administration over tailpipe emission standards. The states want to impose their own limits on greenhouse gas emissions from new cars. But the EPA said that's not allowed. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Rape Allegations in Prison (2007-12-20)
Washington prison officials are scrambling to respond to allegations of sexual misconduct. It involves claims that male guards sexually assaulted female inmates. The alleged rapes date back two years - but only now, in the wake of a lawsuit, is the Department of Corrections responding.


Small Step for Wave Energy (2007-12-20)
Utilities are one step closer to getting watts from waves. Federal regulators issued the nation's first permit to build an experimental wave energy plant. It's planned for the Northwest tip of Washington state. Cathy Duchamp has more.


The Presidential Cycle (2007-12-20)
If there's a direct correlation between politics and the economy, investors should expect to do well in 2008. Financial Commentator Greg Heberlein explains the Presidential Cycle to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Gregoire Strikes Frugal Pose (2007-12-19)
Frugal is the word of the day. At least that's how Governor Chris Gregoire describes her supplemental budget proposal. This is the update to the state's two-year spending plan. But those on the left and the right are already criticizing the governor. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has the story.


Link to Clear Cutting Examinated (2007-12-19)
Investigations are underway into whether clear-cut logging was a factor in two major mudslides this month in Washington and Oregon. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Internet Giants Settle Illegal Ads Suit (2007-12-19)
The nation's three largest Internet companies have agreed to pay 31 and a half million dollars to settle federal allegations that they took ads promoting illegal online gambling. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:47)


Microsoft Settles Gambling Ads Suit (2007-12-19)
Online gambling is against the law and so is advertising for it. Microsoft has agreed to pay $21-million dollars to settle federal civil allegations that it took ads for illegal gaming. Yahoo and Google are also part of the suit. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:06)


Food for Thought: Organizing Recipes (2007-12-19)
No more the jumbled mass of "crammed-in clippings" overflowing their boundaries and creating a traffic hazard. Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson has organized her recipe collection - as she tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Seattle Reacts to Crocodile Cafe Closure (2007-12-19)
The Crocodile Cafe helped put Seattle on the map as the center of the grunge music scene. KPLU's Daysha Eaton has reaction to the venue's abrupt closure.


Tuition Waivers For Flood Victims (2007-12-19)
For victims of the recent floods, putting life back together is an expensive proposition. Now there'll be some financial relief for community college students in the most devastated areas. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


A Kinder, Gentler Water Agreement (2007-12-19)
Conflicts over limited water have long pitted farmers against endangered salmon. In Central Washington, environmentalists and irrigators have forged an agreement they hope will be an example of solving these problems in a more cooperative way. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Fish vs. Farms Water Pact Signed (2007-12-18)
Fish need water. So do farmers. Now, farmers and conservationists near Ellensburg have signed an agreement they say could be a model for how conflicts over water might be solved statewide. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Water Delivery Agreement (2007-12-18)
Governor Chris Gregoire has signed an agreement that will draw water out of a Columbia River reservoir and deliver it to thirsty Columbia Basin farmers, cities, and salmon. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Idaho Vodkas Make the Grade (2007-12-17)
Idaho potatoes aren't just for baking anymore. Two vodkas made from Idaho potatoes have won spots on Wine Enthusiast Magazine's list of the "Top 50 Spirits of 2007." Guy Hand reports.


WASL Scores & Drop Out Fears (2007-12-17)
New WASL scores are out. The latest show there are still thousands of high school seniors who aren't able to pass the test. Only a few hundred were able to make the grade in August's exams. That has some education leaders worried that kids who've failed more than once may get discouraged and drop out. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Seattle Piano Man (2007-12-17)
He's the man playing the piano while you shop, He's also there at that nice restaurant where you're having Sunday brunch. As part of our series "The Meaning of Work," KPLU's Erin Hennessey introduces us to the background piano-man.


Perennial Wheat (2007-12-17)
Research at Washington State University could transform the face of Northwest agriculture. The breakthrough centers on perennial wheat. Varities of the crop could grow for 3 to 7 years without having to be reseeded. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Going Slower to Go Faster (2007-12-17)
If you're sitting in traffic right now, consider this idea. What if the speed limit on the freeway was lowered to 45 miles per hour? Believe it or not, you might actually get to work faster. This is just one out-of-the-box idea traffic engineers and politicians in the Northwest are toying with to speed-up your commute. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Thiel on UW AD Resignation (2007-12-14)
University of Washington athletic director Todd Turner resigned this week, nearly four years after he was hired to clean up a department plagued by scandals. His resignation comes on the heels of university president Mark Emmert's decision to keep head football coach Ty Willingham, despite a losing record. It's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Shipyard Workers Delighted (2007-12-14)
Marine carpenters and metalworkers in the region are expecting a surge in demand for their services. Governor Gregoire's decision to mothball the four steel-electric-class ferries that ran between Keystone harbor and Port Townsend means more work for them. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has the story. (1:05)


Attorney General and Gun Control (2007-12-14)
The State Attorney General wants to make it harder for the mentally ill to get their hands on guns. The move comes in the wake of the Virginia Tech massacre and another shooting spree in Northern Idaho earlier this year. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Military Children Need Teacher Support (2007-12-14)
When soldiers enlist, they enlist their kids along with them. Children struggle at home while parents serve abroad. At a conference in SeaTac, teachers and school counselors talked about how to best support those enlisted kids. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt was there:


Cougar Kitten Sent to Zoo (2007-12-14)
Washington State game wardens just shipped their seventh cougar kitten off to an out-of-state zoo. All of them are believed to be orphans including the one captured and sent off to colorado this week. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Warrants in Lawmaker Extortion Case (2007-12-13)
Four men have been charged with extortion in Spokane. They're accused of attempting to blackmail former state lawmaker Richard Curtis, who resigned after accounts of a gay sex scandal became public. Srrest warrants were issued yesterday and one of the men, Cody Castagna, turned himself in to police last night. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more.


WSU Frat Investigation (2007-12-13)
Freshmen are being allowed back into one fraternity at Washington State University in Pullman, but the housing of freshmen at another fraternity will remain suspended. Glenn Mosley reports.


Health Care Squeeze Grows (2007-12-13)
Unpaid health care bills are piling up in Washington. A new report shows the number people who don't have enough insurance is growing, and hospitals are feeling the pinch. KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis explains.


The Wild Market (2007-12-13)
It's been a turbulent week on Wall Street. Actions by the Federal Reserve caused markets to rise and fall. KPLU's Dave Meyer tries to make sense out of it with financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Homeless Sweeps, Anti-Harassment Law May Collide (2007-12-13)
Seattle just passed a new law that makes harassing homeless people a hate crime. But the city is continuing its policy of clearing illegal encampments and destroying homeless campers' belongings. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty


Steel-Electric Ferries Mothballed (2007-12-13)
Port Townsend is getting a consolation prize from the state. A new passenger-only ferry run has started from downtown Seattle. Meanwhile, Governor Gregoire has announced that the four eighty-year-old steel-electric ferries that were pulled from the Keystone run last month are being mothballed. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:02)


State Officials Applaud California Clean Car Ruling (2007-12-13)
Officials in Washington are exchanging high-fives after a federal judge in California backed tougher limits on greenhouse gas emissions from cars. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Governor Announces Ferry Replacement Plan (2007-12-13)
A new passenger-only ferry run now connects Seattle and Port Townsend. The chamber of commerce there is applauding the move. Governor Gregoire is forging ahead with a replacement plan - now that it's clear the old steel electric-ferries that were pulled from the Keystone run last month are beyond repair. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has the story. (2:09)


Judge Backs California Clean Car Law (2007-12-12)
Washington's efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions from cars and trucks just got a boost from a federal judge in California. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains.


WSU Football Report (2007-12-12)
It's now official, Washington State University has a new head football coach. KPLU's Glenn Mosley reports.


WSU Football Report (2007-12-12)
It's now official, Washington State University has a new head football coach. KPLU's Glenn Mosley reports.


Restoring sagebrush in the West (2007-12-12)
The federal government is using tens-of-millions of your tax dollars to restore a scrubby looking brush to the Western landscape. Inland Northwest biologists say they value expanses of sagebrush just as much as old growth forests. KPLU's Anna King caught up with one planting crew on the Hanford Reach near Richland.


Boom Rule Didn't Apply to Boat in Tacoma Spill (2007-12-12)
A new state rule intended to head off ship-fueling accidents wouldn't have prevented the diesel spill that just fouled Tacoma's Hybelos Waterway. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains


Hanford Clean-Up Ahead of Schedule (2007-12-12)
Here's a rare bit of good news from the Hanford Nuclear site: Workers have cleaned up more than 34-thousand drums of waste ahead of schedule. The drums contain leftovers from plutonium production at Hanford in the 1970s and 80s. KPLU's Anna King reports.


WSU Football Report (2007-12-12)
It's now official, Washington State University has a new head football coach. KPLU's Glenn Mosley reports.


Campus Safety (2007-12-11)
Faster communication on college campuses might save lives. That's the focus of a 14-million-dollar plan Washington Governor Chris Gregoire wants the legislature to approve. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing


Some Flood Charity Misses Target (2007-12-11)
A week after major flooding hit parts of Western Washington and Oregon, donated goods are flowing into hard hit areas. In some cases by the semi-truck load. But what people are donating is not necessarily what flood victims need. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports from hard hit Lewis County.


Boeing Says 787 Production On Track (2007-12-11)
Significant supply-chain wrinkles are still being ironed out. But Boeing says the new 787 airplane is on track. In a quarterly update, the company announced the plane's first flight is still expected for March of next year. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:09)


Diesel Spill Cleanup in Tacoma (2007-12-11)
Clean-up is still underway for an estimated 430 gallons of diesel fuel spilled into the Hylebos Waterway in Tacoma. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has this update


Micro-managing Boeing's 787 Production Line (2007-12-11)
Having a senior manager hovering over every step of a project is not usually a recipe for success in business. But it seems to be getting Boeing's new 787 Dreamliner back on track. In its quarterly update, the company announced there will be no further delays to the program. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:58)


Some Flood Charity Misses Target (2007-12-11)
A week after major flooding hit parts of Western Washington and Oregon, donated goods are flowing into hard hit areas. In some cases by the semi-truck load. But what people are donating is not necessarily what flood victims need. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports from hard hit Lewis County.


Storm Insurance (2007-12-11)
Northwest businesses and home-owners are beginning to file thousand insurance claims for damages from last week's storm. Processing those claims is bound to be complicated. KPLU's Chris Lehman explains.


Mortgage Felons (2007-12-11)
It's possible that you got your home loan from a convicted felon. That's the topic of our real estate commentary today. KPLU's John Maynard talks with Richard Hagar, a Seattle-based educator and appraiser.


Some Flood Charity Misses Target (2007-12-11)
A week after major flooding hit parts of Western Washington and Oregon, donated goods are flowing into hard hit areas. In some cases by the semi-truck load. But what people are donating is not necessarily what flood victims need. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports from hard hit Lewis County.


River Nose plagues Columbia Windsurfers (2007-12-10)
If you live to ride the wind and waves of the Columbia River you might come away with a bad case of river nose. That's the short name for a long list of ailments that plague windsurfers and kiters on the Columbia. Symptoms include: sneezing, sinus infections and a constant runny nose. Environmentalist groups are pleased that the State of Oregon now plans to look into the causes of the dread river nose. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Washington Mutual Layoffs (2007-12-10)
The slowdown in the housing market and trouble in the mortgage lending business is forcing Washington Mutual to cut jobs. The Seattle based company says it will lay off more than three-thousand people across the country, including here in the Northwest.More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


The Meaning of Work - Small Town Doc (2007-12-10)
There was a time when being the country doctor' was a sought-after position in a small town. Now there's a shortage. Today on The Meaning of Work, KPLU's Gary Davis checks-up on a young doctor who's bucking the trend.


Metro Drivers as Police Officers? (2007-12-07)
A jury has found King County Metro negligent in responding to a recent violent attack on two passengers. It faulted the driver for not offering help to the victims. Which raises the question - what should a driver do in that situation? KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt looked into it:


Communications Links Analyzed in Wake of Storm (2007-12-07)
Many communities along the Washington and Oregon coasts found themselves almost completely isolated after this week's powerful storms. Highways and rail lines weren't the only connections that were severed. Some place could barely even communicate with the outside world. KPLU's Chris Lehman has more on what went wrong, and how the states might do better next time.


I-5 Reopens to Trucks (2007-12-07)
Truckers are celebrating the limited reopening of I-5 in Southwest Washington this morning. The first big rigs rolled through last night. Car traffic is expected to follow soon. KPLU's Austin Jenkins was there for the big reopening.


Thiel on Willingham Staying at UW (2007-12-07)
A lot of Washington Husky fans are upset with the university's decision this week to keep head football coach Ty Willingham. The move comes despite the Huskies' last-place finish in the Pac-10 and a 4-and-9 record this year. In his three seasons at U-W, Willingham has compiled an 11-and-25 record. But Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick keeping Willingham at the helm is a good thing.


Metro Drivers as Police Officers? (2007-12-07)
A jury has found King County Metro negligent in responding to a recent violent attack on two passengers. It faulted the driver for not offering help to the victims. Which raises the question - what should a driver do in that situation? KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt looked into it:


To Build Levees or Not to Build Levees? (2007-12-07)
This week's floods have anxious residents assessing the damage to their homes and officials scrambling to reopen roads. At the same time, environmentalists are looking ahead - and raising questions about lessons learned. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


River Flow Records Broken in Floods (2007-12-07)
As tthe floodwaters recede from this week's storms, the United States Geological Servey says at least 10 river-flow records were broken in Washington. Four of them were in the Chehalis River Basin. That helps explain why the small farm town of Doty, in Western Lewis County, was hit so hard. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more.


Metro Drivers as Police Officers? (2007-12-07)
A jury has found King County Metro negligent in responding to a recent violent attack on two passengers. It faulted the driver for not offering help to the victims. Which raises the question - what should a driver do in that situation? KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt looked into it:


Tacoma Gets New Hotels (2007-12-07)
This week a couple hundred people will gather in Tacoma's new convention center for meetings and holiday parties. The center has been bringing local and national businesses to the city of Tacoma for 5 years now. And as KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports, those people need places to stay:


Aid Groups Jump Into Flood Relief (2007-12-07)
The Northwest is home to an unusual concentration of international relief agencies. This week's flood disaster has prompted two of those charities to turn their lenses on their own back yards. KPLU's Tom Banse has part of that story.


Seattle Streetcar Network Proposed (2007-12-07)
Seattle's plans for an expanded monorail went by the wayside because of unrealistic financing. And phase two of Sound Transit recently failed at the ballot box. But the city's transit boosters aren't giving up. A group called the Streetcar Alliance has unveiled its vision for an expansion of the new South Lake Union trolley. An extensive network would connect all of Seattle's neighborhoods. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:57)


Flood Victims Return Home (2007-12-06)
Flood victims in Southwest Washington are returning home for the first time. KPLU's Austin Jenkins brings us the story from Lewis County.


Top Blues CDs of 2007 (2007-12-06)
If you have a Blues fan on your holiday shopping list this year, KPLU's All Blues Host John Kessler has some suggestions for what to get them. In our music commentary this month, John tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick about some of his favorite Blues releases of 2007.


Top Blues CDs of 2007 (2007-12-06)
If you have a Blues fan on your holiday shopping list this year, KPLU's All Blues Host John Kessler has some suggestions for what to get them. In our music commentary this month, John tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick about some of his favorite Blues releases of 2007.


Structured Investment Vehicles (2007-12-06)
Structured Investement Vehicles are playing a big role in the credit crunch. Many government entities have money in them, including King County. What is an SIV? Financial commentator Greg Heberlein explains the concept to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


As Water Recedes Crews Hurry to Fix I-5 (2007-12-06)
It looks like I-5 in Southwest Washington won't open until this weekend at the earliest. Flood Waters till cover much of the main North-South artery that's been closed since monday. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this update from the scene.


Streetcar Alliance Wants Expansion (2007-12-06)
With less than a week to go before Seattle's new South Lake Union Streetcar launches, a coalition of neighborhood groups is pushing for its expansion. They're proposing a network of five additional lines that would connect with other transit. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:09)


New Global Warming Bills (2007-12-06)
Lawmakers in Olympia will consider two new bills to combat global warming when they reconvene in January. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


New State Supreme Court Justice (2007-12-05)
Governor Chris Gregoire has appointed a new justice to the state's Supreme Court to replace retiring justice Bobbe Bridge. While Gregoire toured the devastation wrought by massive flooding in the Western part of the state, the formal announcement went ahead in Spokane. And, as Spokane Public Radio's Amanda Loder reports, Gregoire's last appointment made history.


I-5 Remains Closed (2007-12-05)
The direct freeway link between Portland and Seattle remains closed due to flooding from the Chehalis River. The closure of Interstate 5 is costing truckers dearly. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from the scene.


Coastal Areas Clean Up After Storm (2007-12-05)
Communitites all along the Northwest coast are in clean-up mode after this week's devastating wind and rainstorms. Most of the flood warnings have been lifted in Western Washington and Northwest Oregon, but there are still some trouble spots. Both states plan to request federal help to fix the widespread damage. KPLU's Chris Lehman filed this report from the coast.


Seattle Gifted Program Under Review (2007-12-05)
The Seattle School District is evaluating its program for gifted students. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing tells us some disturbing flaws are turning up.


Food for Thought: Holiday Chow (2007-12-05)
With the holidays, comes holiday eating, the good stuff you get only at this time of year. Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson talks about that, with KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Storm Damages Ship, Rescue Tug Goes to Work (2007-12-05)
The hurricane-force winds that battered the Northwest coast on Monday gave the state's oil spill prevention tugboat its first mission of the season. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Enviros Pitch Climate Change Proposals (2007-12-05)
In the last legislative session, Washington lawmakers set ambitious goals for cutting global warming pollution. Now, environmental groups are saying it's time to take action to meet those goals. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Record Rainfalls, Record Flooding Likely (2007-12-04)
A powerful Pacific storm has walloped much of Washington and Oregon, bringing with it heavy rains and high winds. At least two people have been killed. And the worst may be yet to come as swollen rivers spill their banks in the coming hours and days. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Flooded Basements, Dampened Spirits (2007-12-04)
Even with near-record rainfall, Seattle's Madison Valley has so far escaped a repeat of the flash flood that killed a woman last December. But residents who suffered heavy losses a year ago are looking in dismay as their basements take on water all over again. KPLU's Liam Moriarty walked around the neighborhood and got a tour of one family's soggy d j vu


Audubon Report Says Many Birds in Trouble (2007-12-04)
The Northwest's Greater Sage Grouse is in trouble. But the bird that prefers dwindling sage-studded habitat isn't alone in its plight. According to a recent report by the National Audubon Society and the American Bird Conservancy, nearly one-third of the nation's bird species are in eminent danger. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Global Liquidity (2007-12-04)
Is a recession on the horizon? Many fingers are pointing at the subprime lending collapse. Mark Anderson monitors the economy in his computing and telecommunications industry newsletter, Strategic News Service. Speaking from his office in the San Juan Islands, Anderson tells KPLU's Dave Meyer the subprime crunch is a symptom of much bigger problems with global liquidity.


Rain and Snowmelt Mean Flooding (2007-12-04)
The rains may have tapered off, but major flooding is still predited today along several rivers in Western Washington. In some places, rain and snowmelt are combining to create record clood conditions. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Media Tour Drydocked Ferries (2007-12-04)
Shipyard crews in Seattle are working double shifts to repair the hull of an 80-year-old ship. The Quinault car ferry should be ready to return to the Keystone - Port Townsend run in early February. Its sister ship, the Illahee, is being inspected to see if it should be repaired as well. Washington State Ferries invited media to see the ships in drydock. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp took a peek. (2:05)


Northwest Slammed by Powerful Storm (2007-12-03)
A powerful Pacific storm has walloped much of Washington and Oregon - bringing with it heavy rains and high winds. At least two people have been killed. And the worst may be yet to come as swollen rivers spill their banks in the coming hours and days. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Storm Causes Landslides (2007-12-03)
The wet weather is wreaking havoc on hillsides around the region. In Seattle, KPLU's Paula Wissel caught up with Mayor Greg Nickels as he checked out a landslide over a major street.


Washington Coast Hit Hard By Storm (2007-12-03)
The Washington Coast has been hit especially hard by the powerful storm. An Aberdeen man was killed when a tree fell on him outside his home. Highways are closed and power is out. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Powerful Storm Wallops Northwest (2007-12-03)
A powerful Pacific storm has walloped much of Washington and Oregon - bringing with it heavy rains and high winds. At least two people have been killed. And the worst may be yet to come as swollen rivers spill their banks in the coming hours and days. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Madison Valley Residents Keep Nervous Vigil (2007-12-03)
The heavy rains and widespread flooding have residents of Seattle's Madison Valley nervously eying their basements and backyards. KPLU's Liam Moriarty spoke to people in the neighborhood who said last December's devastating flood is weighing heavily on their minds.


A Job Where Less is More (2007-12-03)
For some of us, getting rid of our clutter is too difficult to do alone. If you've reached this point, you might need the help of someone like Amy Gray. She's a personal organizer. In our latest installment of the Meaning of Work, KPLU's Jennifer Wing tells us about a job that's defined by the phrase: less, is more.


Initiative 297 Callenged in Court Again (2007-12-03)
It's already been deemed unconstitutional. But attorneys for the state aren't giving up on a citizen initiative that bans new shipments of radioactive waste to the Hanford Nuclear site outside Richland. State attorneys will be defending Initiative 297 today in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in Seattle. KPLU's Anna King reports.


A Job Where Less is More (2007-12-03)
For some of us, getting rid of our clutter is too difficult to do alone. If you've reached this point, you might need the help of someone like Amy Gray. She's a personal organizer. In our latest installment of the Meaning of Work, KPLU's Jennifer Wing tells us about a job that's defined by the phrase: less, is more.


Water Balloons to Fight Wildfires (2007-12-03)
Fighting wildfires from the air id dangerous and often imprecise work. But there may be a safer and more accurate solution: water balloons. Guy Hand reports.


Decline in Child Safey Seats (2007-11-30)
Motor vehicle crashes are the number one cause of death for children between the ages of four and eight. Yet parents and other caregivers may be underestimating that fact. A new survey by Washington State University shows that there's a statewide decline in the use of child safety seats. More from KPLU's Erin Hennessey.


Thiel on College Football Coaches (2007-11-30)
A lot of college football coaches have been let go in the past week. One of them is Washington State University head coach Bill Doba. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talks with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about how the Internet is playing a big role in deciding the fates of many of these coaches.


Walmart Workers' Class Action (2007-11-30)
More than 75,000 current and former workers for Wal-Mart in Washington are part of a state-wide class action. The suit covers all hourly employees who worked off the clock or worked through their breaks without compensation over the past decade. They'll be getting notices in the mail starting today (Friday.) More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:13)


WA Legislature Reinstates Property Tax Cap (2007-11-30)
The State Legislature has re-instated a one-percent cap on property tax increases. It happened during a one-day special session yesterday. The measure resurrects Initiative 747, which was recently thrown out by the State Supreme Court. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more.


NW Farmers Confront Climate Change (2007-11-30)
Here at home, global climate change brings the prospect of drier, hotter summers, diminished snowpack, and lowland flooding. There's another less obvious aspect: we face more pests, weeds, and diseases. They could be among the biggest challenges for Northwest Farmers. That's what a bunch of them heard at a conference yesterday. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Boeing CEO Defends Outsourcing Strategy (2007-11-30)
Boeing is still fully committed to the global business model it's using to build the new 787 Dreamliner - despite problems with it that have delayed first flight. Commercial Airplanes CEO Scott Carson spoke at the governor's first annual aerospace summit in Bellevue. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp was there. (1:27)


WA Republicans Offer Alternative Bills (2007-11-29)
Washington State lawmakers will convene today [Thursday] for a one-day special session on property taxes. Democrats control the legislature. But Republicans still plan to propose several tax relief measures of their own. Olympia KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Nordstrom Fades out its Live Piano Players (2007-11-29)
One of the sounds of the holidays is fading. A half-dozen Nordstrom stores in the Northwest have - or are planning to -- let go their piano players. KPLU's Tom Banse reports. :52


Social Security Benefits (2007-11-29)
When planning for retirement, you need to decide when you want to start collecting Social Security. Should you go for a smaller benefit at an early age or wait for the maximum payments at age 70? KPLU's Dave Meyer goes over the options with financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Home Prices Strong Across WA (2007-11-28)
Washington ramians a comparatively bright spot for the slumping national housing market. Glenn Mosley explains.


Tribes Conducting Sturgeon Study (2007-11-28)
They can live up to 100 years and grow up to 12 feet long. But how many Columbia River white sturgeon should anglers be allowed to catch? Northwest tribes plan to answer that question by trapping and tagging some of the giants this winter. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Power Plant Iced by Global Warming (2007-11-28)
State regulators have put a big new power plant on ice. It's the first time in the Northwest that a project has been frozen because of global warming concerns. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


NW Still Defies Housing Price Slump (2007-11-28)
Seattle is no longer number 1 in the country when it comes to housing price increases. Charolette North Carolina, now has the top spot, with Seattle a close second. In Seattle, and other cities across the Pacific Northwest, housing prices continue to buck the national slump. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Metro Accident Claims (2007-11-28)
Parents of a 21-year-old who died when a Metro bus struck his pick-up truck are part of a $100 million damage claim against King County. They say the bus driver who crashed into their son was negligent and had a history of reckless driving. More from KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel.


WA Special Session Promises Fireworks (2007-11-28)
The Washington State legislature will reconvene tomorrow for a one-day special session. Lawmakers plan to reinstate a one-percent cap on property tax increases that was thrown out by the Washington Supreme Court. But minority Republicans are already calling the Governor's bill a sham. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Food for Thought: Ravioli Party (2007-11-28)
Making your own ravioli isn't hard, especially with a group of friends in the kitchen, as Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Good Jobs Without College (2007-11-28)
You don't necessarily need to go to college to get the skills to earn a good living. But most students aren't aware that they have options. U.S. Senator Patty Murray says she wants to change that - she held a field hearing on workforce development in Seattle. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp was there. (0:57)


Future Workforce Needs More Skills (2007-11-28)
How to better educate and train the next generation of workers. That was the subject of a field hearing in Seattle called by U.S. Senator Patty Murray. She says a new national strategy is needed to create a workforce that has the skills employers want. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:53)


Study Claims Cholera Control Possible (2007-11-27)
Cholera could be controlled worldwide if an inexpensive oral vaccine was made available to just a portion of affected populations. That's the findings of new research from a Seattle-based scientist. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


What's the Calorie Count? (2007-11-27)
Have you ever wondered how many calories you're swirling in that glass of holiday wine? Well, the federal government is proposing a new rule that would feature calorie and alcohol content information on all containers of alcohol. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Loft Living in Small NW Cities (2007-11-27)
You might expect fancy loft living in downtown Seattle or Portland. But how about this? There are now lofts going up in downtown Yakima and Pendleton, Oregon. KPLU's Anna King takes a closer look at how small Northwest towns are embracing downtown living.


Missing Soldier Returns (2007-11-27)
An Army sergeant, whom police thought have dissapeared under suspicious circumstances, has returned to Fort Lewis. Kristian Foden-Vencil reports.


Safety Concerns on Capitol Hill (2007-11-26)
Safety is on the minds of gays and lesbians who live in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. They plan to voice their concerns directly to Seattle Police and the prosecutor's office. KPLU's Jennifer Wing reports.


A Man With Influential Taste Buds (2007-11-26)
When you walk into a coffee shop, do you ever stop to think about all that goes into creating your latte? In addition to baristas and roasters, there are tasters who screen the coffee before it reaches customers. In this week's installment of The Meaning of Work, KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp introduces us to a man with an influential palette. (3:31)


Ferry System Needs Funding Strategy (2007-11-26)
Car ferry service won't be restored to the Port Townsend-Keystone run until the first or second week of February. State ferry officials estimate it will take till then and cost about four million dollars ($4m) just to repair one boat, the Quinault. Discussions of a longer-term solution began at a meeting with legislators in Seattle. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:25)


Police Access to Photo IDs (2007-11-26)
If a picture is worth a thousand words, police in Washington state may soon have a whole lot more information about criminal suspects. KPLU's Paula Wissel explains.


Thiel on 2007 Apple Cup (2007-11-23)
This weekend is the 100th Apple Cup football game between the Washington Huskies and the Washington State Cougars. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel tells KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick that this year's game comes at a low point for both programs but there's still at least one reason to celebrate it.


Buy Nothing Day (2007-11-23)
It's Black Friday - the busiest shopping day of the year. Millions of Americans are clogging malls and swarming big-boxes to get holiday bargains. But others are participating in a 24-hour shopping moratorium to encourage a more sustainable, less commercial culture. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty


Signs To Watch For (2007-11-22)
It's been a rough ride on Wall Street this fall. Stocks hit record highs in early October but have been sliding in recent weeks. How can you know when it's safe to get back into the market? KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Justice Report Slams King County Jail (2007-11-21)
The Justice Department has delivered a stinging report over health conditions in the King County Jail. The report charges inmates rights are being violated, but county leaders disagree. KPLU's Gary Davis has the story.


Keystone Ferry Shut Down (2007-11-21)
Thousands of people are out of luck this weekend. The state ferry system says it's just a case of bad timing that they had to discontinue the Keystone-Port Townsend run right before Thanksgiving. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp has the story. (1:13)


Toys to Avoid (2007-11-21)
That teddy bear or toy car you want to buy for your child or favorite nephew might look cute and fun. But as KPLU's Jennifer Wing reports they could be deadly.


Eat Local for Thanksgiving (2007-11-21)
Locavore - noun - "Someone who strives to buy food grown and prepared within the local region." The New Oxford American Dictionary has selected locavore as its word of the year, in a nod to a burgeoning social trend. In Washington, a growing coalition of farmers, consumers and merchants are putting the new word into action. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Hanford Gets Fined, Does Community Projects (2007-11-21)
It's the largest fine the Environmental Protection Agency has ever issued at Hanford: $1.4 million for safety violations at the nuclear waste site. But, instead of writing a check, the agencies involved are buying two jet boats and a greenhouse for the tri-cities. KPLU's Anna King explains.


Bay Area Spill Turns Up Heat on Cantwell Proposals (2007-11-21)
The freighter that spilled its fuel oil into San Francisco Bay has Senator Maria Cantwell concerned. She's calling for hearings about preventing spills from non-tanker vessels. Cantwell was in Seattle Tuesday, meeting with Coast Guard and state environmental officials. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty was there


Food for Thought: Thanksgiving (2007-11-21)
Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson is having (had) a really big Thanksgiving - as she tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Passenger Only Service for Keystone In the Works (2007-11-21)
State Ferry Officials say they're doing everything they can to restore partial service to the Keystone-Port Townsend run. Crews are working through the Thanksgiving holiday to get a passenger-only ferry ready. They hope it will be up and running sometime tomorrow or Saturday morning at the latest. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:19)


Grays Anatomy: A Coastal Rebirth (2007-11-21)
On the Washington coast, an economically distressed timber county is going green. Grays Harbor County wants to transform itself from a community of extraction to a community of renewables. As part of our weeklong series on Northwest communities reinventing themselves, KPLU's Austin Jenkins introduces us to some young adults at the forefront of this economic transformation.


Toxic Toys (2007-11-21)
This time every year we hear about toys we might unknowingly buy for the children in our lives that could hurt or even kill them. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


Jesuits Reach $50 million Deal (2007-11-20)
The Roman Catholic order of Jesuits, based in Portland, has reached a deal to pay $50 million to settle sex abuse lawsuits in Alaska. But, as Colin Fogarty reports, the deal is not yet complete.


Wetlands Investigation into Horse Arena (2007-11-20)
The Army Corps of Engineers says a development along Interstate Five in Southwest Washington has the potential to be the biggest wetlands violation the Northwest has ever seen. But the backers of the 7,000 seat indoor horse arena disagree. They're confident construction on the publicly-subsidized arena can still begin on schedule. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


From Superfund to Super Fun (2007-11-20)
About 10 years ago, North Idaho's Silver Valley was one of the poorest places in the state and the region. But the self-proclaimed Silver Capital of the World is regaining some of its former luster. The historic mining towns of Wallace and Kellogg, Idaho are transforming into resort or recreation destinations. To add icing to the cake, the old mining industry is coming back from the dead.


Producoing Camelina-Based Biodiesel (2007-11-20)
Move over canola. A Seattle-based biotech and a Texas energy company are announcing a joint venture today (Tues.) to make lots of biodiesel from a plant called camelina (CAMEL-leen-a). It grows well on marginal land. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Cantwell Calls for Oil Spill Hearings (2007-11-20)
When you say "oil spill," most people think of oil tanker ships. But a lot of major spills - including the one earlier this month in the San Francisco Bay -- involve freighters or other ships that spill their fuel oil. That's prompted Senator Maria Cantwell to call for hearings about preventing oil spills from non-tanker vessels. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


PC Sales Forecast (2007-11-20)
Is there a personal computer on your holiday shopping list? Mark Anderson publishes Strategic News Service, a computing and telecommunicatons newsletter. Speaking from his office in the San Juan Islands, he told KPLU's Dave Meyer the last quarter of this year will be a blow-out for PC sales.


Teaching Compassion (2007-11-19)
There is more pressure than ever on schools to get students to perform well academically. But, what about their emotional intelligence? A new program in the Northwest aims to make kids more understanding. KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing explains.


Keeping Watch Over the Marine Environment (2007-11-19)
It's a job title that has an almost medieval ring to it; "soundkeeper." And like the historic keepers of royal seals or ancient books, Seattle resident Sue Joerger has taken on a personal responsibility to protect a valuable treasure -- the Puget Sound. In this installment of our series The Meaning of Work, KPLU's Liam Moriarty follows the soundkeeper on her rounds


Teaching Conmpassion (2007-11-19)
There is more pressure than ever on schools to get students to perform well academically.But, what about their emotional intelligence? A new program in the Northwest aims to make kids more understanding. KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing explains.


Mitt Romney in Seattle (2007-11-19)
Illegal immigrants shouldn't get any breaks. That's the message GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney delivered during his swing through the state. More from KPLU's Paula Wissel.


Big Bucks to Replace Old Woodstoves (2007-11-19)
Tacoma-area residents with an old woodstove may be eligible to trade it in for as much as $2,500 toward a cleaner alternative. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Canadian Cattle Start Rolling into US (2007-11-19)
Starting today, live cattle of any age can be brought across the US/Canada border. That marks a return to the way things were before an imported Canadian Holstein was found to have mad cow disease in Central Washington four years ago. Some Northwest ranchers say they're still worried about the health of the canadian animals. They're also worried about what opening the border will do to the price of steak. Others say it's about time things returned to normal. KPLU's Anna King reports.


An Uneasy Timber Truce (2007-11-19)
For more than a decade, Northwest environmentalists have waged a war on what they consider unsustainable logging practices. They've filed lawsuit after lawsuit to stop timber sales. That's why in timber towns, environmentalists are often blamed for ruining the economy. So, what if the two sided called a turce and decided to work together? It's happening in a Northeast corner of Washington. And that's where we start our 4-part series on Northwest communities reinventing themselves.


Thiel on Soccer in Seattle (2007-11-16)
In our weekly chat with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel, Art talks with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick about the announcement that Seattle will be home to a Major League Soccer franchise in 2009.


Passport Rule May Be Less Trouble Than Thought (2007-11-16)
By next summer, all travelers driving into the US from Canada will need a passport. That requirement has caused much worry in the tourism industry on both sides of the border. A new study debunks conventional thinking that a lot of travelers will stay home. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Washington Mutual (2007-11-16)
One of the nation's largest instutions is based in Seattle, and it's going through some hard times. KPLU's Dave Meyer and financial commentator Greg Heberlein take a look at the challenges facing Washington Mutual.


Police and Protestors Clash (2007-11-15)
Is stopping the shipment of military goods a way to stop the war in Iraq? That's the question in Olympia this week. That's where protestors and police have clashed over military shipments through the port. Tuesday night the situation escalated with forty-three people arrested. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Anatomy of a War Protest (2007-11-15)
A series of war protests in Olympia this week has led to dozens of arrests and wild clashes with police. Demonstrators have chosen a tactic called "Direct Action." Unlike a planned march through the streets, they're blocking streets to try to stop military shipments out of the Port of Olympia. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this anatomy of a war protest.


Sighs of Relief for Simple Majority Vote (2007-11-15)
The victory celebration took place in Seattle, but the sighs of relief could be heard around the state. Education leaders have declared victory in the effort to approve a simple majority vote for school levies. It now leads by eleven-thousand votes. KPLU's Gary Davis looks at measure's impact.


Starbucks U.S. Traffic Declining (2007-11-15)
Starbucks reports its profits jumped 35 percent in the third quarter. But the coffee company says it's noticed a disturbing drop in traffic at its cafes in the U.S. Starbucks stock took a beating on that news, falling about nine percent in after-hours trading. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:05)


WA & ID Make Progress Against Hunger (2007-11-15)
Washington state and Idaho are making progress reducing hunger. Oregon is treading water, according to an annual report released by the federal Department of Agriculture. KPLU's Tom Banse has details.


Teen Smoking Trends Raise Concerns (2007-11-15)
Today is the annual Great American Smoke-Out . National trends show after years of declines the number of teens who smoke is beginning to flatten out. That has health officials worried. As KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis explains, the battle over tobacco advertising is heating up.


Washington Mutual (2007-11-15)
One of the nation's largest banking institutions is based in Seattle, and it's going through some hard times. KPLU's Dave Meyer and financial commentator Greg Heberlein take a look at the challenges facing Washington Mutual.


Simple Majority Ballot Measure Takes Lead (2007-11-14)
A ballot measure that would allow school levies in Washington to pass with a simple majority is now leading in returns by about 7,000 votes. A batch of newly counted ballots, many from King County, turned the race around yesterday afternoon. But the final outcome is still too close to call. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Tacoma Goodwill Selling Used Cars (2007-11-14)
When you have mobility, you're able to move up in the world. That's the idea behind a new program for low-income earners in Pierce County. Tacoma Goodwill is giving them great deals on used cars - if they meet certain eligibility requirements. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (2:10)


Simple Majority Declares Victory (2007-11-14)
They have a narrow lead, but they're declaring victory for their cause. Backers of a plan to allow school levies to be approved by simple majority say they're confident the measure will pass. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Food for Thought: Chanterelles and Truffles (2007-11-14)
Mushroom lover and Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson is now La Belle de Chanterelle - as she explains to KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


"Mosquito Fleet" Fuels King County Ferry Plans (2007-11-14)
Early Puget Sound settlements were served by a swarm of small steamboats known as the Mosquito Fleet. The boats moved goods and people at a time when roads weren't a reliable way of getting around. Now -- with the region's highways getting more and more crowded -- King County sees passenger-only ferries as making a comeback. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


AIDS Vaccine Study 'Unblinded' (2007-11-14)
Volunteers in a worldwide AIDS vaccine study will now be told if they received the vaccine or a placebo. Last week study leaders revealed some participants may have been put at increased risk for developing H-I-V, which causes AIDS. KPLU Health and Science reporter Gary Davis has more.


Food for Thought: Chanterelles and Truffles (2007-11-14)
Mushroom lover and Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson is now "La Belle de Chanterelle," as she explains to KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Seattle Lawyers Protest (2007-11-14)
Hundreds of lawyers marched quietly around the federal courthouse in Seattle. The procession was a show of support for lawyers in Pakistan who've been jailed for protesting martial law. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel explains.


Wheels to Work Program (2007-11-13)
You might think of Goodwill as a place to buy used clothing or household items. In Tacoma, Goodwill Industries is getting into the business of selling used cars. It's part of the agency's overall goal of helping low-income earners get and keep better jobs. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:10)


Foreign Language Trends (2007-11-13)
More students than ever in the Unites States are studying a foreign language. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing looks at what's popular, and why.


Food for Thought: Locally Caught Chum Salmon (2007-11-13)
There's something fishy about today's Food for Thought, with Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein.


Foreign Language Trends (2007-11-13)
More students than ever in the United States are studying a foreign language. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing looks at what's popular, and why.


King County Goes Into the Ferry Business (2007-11-13)
The memory of Puget Sound's historic Mosquito Fleet was evoked today as King County Council members voted to expand passenger-only ferry service. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Waiting for Vote Count (2007-11-13)
Nearly a week after the polls closed, some candidates and campaigns are still anxiously waiting to find out if they are winners or losers. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, the vote count being released Tuesday on a big batch of mail-in ballots could bring some answers.


Unsealing The Adoption Records Safe (2007-11-13)
Should adults who were adopted have access to their birth records? A report published this week by an adoption reform group says yes. It has renewed debate about the privacy rights of birth mothers, an issue with a long history in the Pacific Northwest. KPLU's Cathy Duchamp explains.


Foreign Language Trends (2007-11-13)
More students than ever in the Unites States are studying a foreign language. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing looks at what's popular, and why.


The Meaning of Work: Listeners Comment (2007-11-12)
On our weekly series, The Meaning of Work, we've talked with everyone from a mailman to a funeral director about what they do for a living. Today, we turn to you. KPLU's Paula Wissel checks the e-mail feedback and listener comment line.


Winter Storm Preparedness (2007-11-12)
It's dark by 5 o'clock these days and there are more leaves on the ground than on the trees. As winter comes on, it's a good time to recall the lessons learned from last year's floods and windstorms. As KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports, getting prepared is half the battle.


Simple Majority Measure Gains Ground (2007-11-12)
A school levy reform measure that appeared headed for defeat after last Tuesday's election now is considered too close to call. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Gold Mine Controversy in NE Washington (2007-11-12)
There's gold in them there hills! Almost a billion dollars worth of it. And a Canadian mining company is going after it, in remote Northeast Washington. The Buckhorn mine promises to be the largest underground gold mine in Washington history. Construction is already underway. But opponents are determined to stop the project. KPLU's Austin Jenkins recently visited the mine site.


Thiel on Sonics Arena Developments (2007-11-09)
It's been a dismal start to the Sonics' season, both on and off the court. The team has lost its first five games - their worst start in nearly 40 years. And, owner Clay Bennett has confirmed the speculation that he plans to relocate the team to Oklahoma City. But Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel doesn't think this is the end for the Sonics. Rather, it's the beginning of a long battle that could still keep the team in Seattle. He talked with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick.


States Sue EPA Over Clean Cars (2007-11-09)
Washington and a more than a dozen other states have joined California in suing the Bush Administration over tough state greenhouse gas emission laws. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Women's Health Event in Seattle (2007-11-09)
Heart disease is the biggest killer of women in the U-S, and its victims continue to rise in number. That statistic is true for women in the northwest, as well, especially for the poor. Today (Saturday) one Seattle provider will open its doors to women on fixed incomes to offer a day of life-saving care. KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis explains.


Supreme Court Throws Out Property Tax Cap (2007-11-09)
Reaction from across Washington after the State Supreme Court has thrown out Initiative 747. The Tim Eyman measure approved by voters back in 2001 imposed a one-percent annual cap on property tax increases. What does the ruling mean for your property taxes? KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this in-depth report.


The Bad Boys of Environmentalism: An Inverview with Michael Shellenberger and Ted Nordhaus (2007-11-09)
Last week, during the Mayors Climate Summit in Seattle, we heard a lot about growing the green economy of the future. But how do we get there? Environmental consultants Michael Shellenberger and Ted Nordhaus have written a book titled "Breakthrough: From the Death of Environmentalism to the Politics of Possibility." In it they argue that combating global warming will require a radical departure from the less is more ethic that's characterized mainstream environmentalism since the 1960s.


Legal Challenge to I-960 (2007-11-08)
Washington voters may have said yes to Initiative 960; but oppoinents are already thinking about a legal challenge. 960 is the latest anti-tax measure from initiative guru, Tim Eyman. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Retail Sales (2007-11-08)
Retail sales figures for October will be announced next week. The numbers are expected to be a preview of the holiday shopping season. KPLU's Dave Meyer spoke with financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


ACLU Settles Case With Seattle Police (2007-11-08)
Seattle Police admit they made a mistake when they detained a bystander who was taking photographs of officers making a street arrest. The ACLU sued on the man's behalf, saying his civil rights were violated. KPLU's Gary Davis has the story.


FCC Media Ownership Hearing in Seattle (2007-11-08)
It's the final chance for the public to voice their concerns about proposed rule changes that would allow more media consolidation in the U. S. The Federal Communications Commission is holding the last of six hearings on the issue tomorrow / later today (Friday, 4-11pm)in Seattle. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:12)


FCC Hearing Expected to Draw Crowds (2007-11-08)
Supporters of independent media are expected to turn out in full force tonight (Friday) at Seattle's Town Hall. Governor Chris Gregoire will be there as well. They'll be testifying at a hearing before the Federal Communications Commission, which is considering proposed changes to media ownership rules. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:52)


Proposition 1 Defeated (2007-11-07)
Voters in King, Pierce and Snohomish Counties have turned thumbs-down on the most ambitious transportation proposal in state history. Proposition 1 - the Roads and Transit measure - was defeated by a substantial margin. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty


Prop 1 -- Was Global Warming the Dealbreaker? (2007-11-07)
Voters in the Central Puget Sound region have shot down a far-reaching transportation proposal that would have expanded light rail and highways over the next 20 years. Was global warming the dealbreaker? KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Snohomish Flood Lessons Learned (2007-11-07)
It's been a year since heavy rains destroyed homes and damaged property in Snohomish County. The Election Day floods provided some early on-the-job-training for the county's new Emergency Management director. Now, he says the county is better prepared. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Initiative 960 Leads (2007-11-07)
It looks like anti-tax guru Tim Eyman is poised to chalk-up another victory. His latest ballot measure has a healthy lead in the early returns. I-960 would require the legislature to pass all tax and fee increases by a two-thirds vote. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Proposition 1: Where do we Go Now? (2007-11-07)
The voters were clear in their rejection of the massive transportation package known as Proposition 1. What isn't certain is how decision makers will move forward on solving the region's growing congestion. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


Satterberg Elected King County Prosecutor (2007-11-07)
Republican Dan Satterberg defeated Democrat Bill Sherman n the race for King County Prosecutor. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has more.


Proposition 1: Where Do We Go Now? (2007-11-07)
The voters were clear in their rejection of the massive transportation package known as Proposition 1. What isn't certain is how decision makers will move forward on solving the region's growing congestion. More form KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


Puzzling Data from AIDS Vaccine Trial (2007-11-07)
Seattle is the headquarters for an international network of pharmaceutical research focused on finding a vaccine to prevent AIDS. One new drug had shown great promise until its clinical trials were halted earlier this fall. Now, a new report indicates the vaccine being tested may have put its volunteers at an even greater risk of developing HIV. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp has the story. (1:40)


Kent Schools Hit By MRSA (2007-11-07)
The Kent School District says it has three confirmed cases of MRSA. It's a drug resistant bacterial infection, but health officials says there is no cause for alarm. KPLU's Jennifer Wing reports.


Voters in Non-Spending Mood (2007-11-07)
From the likely passage of Tim Eyman's latest anti-tax measure to the apparent failure of the region's massive transportation package, Washington voters have sent a message. They are not in a spending mood. But, that seems out of synch with the state of the regional economy. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:06)


Jury Convicts Russel (2007-11-07)
The vehicular homicide trail of Frederick Russell has ended with a guilty verdict. Russell is the former Washington State University student who fled to Ireland after a 2001 car accident left three fellow WSU students dead. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has reaction to the verdict.


Public Health Nurses Reach Agreement (2007-11-07)
After negotiations that dragged out for more than a year, public health nurses in Seattle and King County have a tentative contract agreement. More from KPLU Business & Labor Reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Real Estate Better in NW (2007-11-06)
The value of real estate is dropping dramatically in many places around the country, including the Southwest. While not perfect, conditions are better here in the Northwest. Why? KPLU's John Maynard talks with Richard Hagar, a Seattle-based educator and appraiser.


Public Health Nurses Picketing (2007-11-06)
Unionized Public Health nurses for Seattle and King County are picketing this morning (Tuesday 11-6-07.) They say negotiations over a new contract have stalled - and that the county is asking them to do too much for too little. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:53)


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Gregoire vs Rossi: Congestion Relief (2007-11-06)
What should be the top priority of a state department of transportation? Safety? Road maintenance? Congestion relief? Republican gubernatorial candidate Dino Rossi says congestion. Governor Chris Gregoire says all three. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Public Health Nurses in Contract Talks (2007-11-06)
Public health nurses who work for Seattle and King County picketed outside their employers' offices this morning. A state mediator is presiding over contract talks today. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:12)


More MRSA (2007-11-06)
The Kent School District says it has three confirmed cases of MRSA [Mer-Sa] . It's a drug resistant bacterial infection, but health officials say there is no cause for alarm. KPLU's Jennifer Wing has more.


Another Washington Lawmaker in Trouble (2007-11-06)
Another Republican state lawmaker from Southwest Washington is in trouble. This time it's Representative Jim Dunn from Vancouver. His own party wants him sanction for alleged inappropriate behavior. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


School Lockdowns (2007-11-06)
Lockdowns are as much a part of high school campuses these days as fire drills. But how these situations are handled is getting more attention. KPLU's Jennifer Wing tells us that's because of a recent incident at Marysville-Pilchuck High School.


Eco-Therapy for War Vets (2007-11-05)
Individual states are stepping up to provide more help to returning soldiers and sailors. A novel program under the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs uses nature to heal the wounds of war. Vets also get experience in environmental restoration that could lead to a good civilian job. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Death Penalty for Sea Lions (2007-11-05)
A task force report to be delivered today endorses the death penalty for some hungry sea lions. We're speaking of the sea lions that turn up each spring to feast on threatened salmon at Bonneville Dam. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


NW Mining Reform (2007-11-05)
The debate over mining on public land shifts to the US Senate, now that the House has approved a bill to reform the 135 year-old mining law. The bill would, for the first time ever, require miners to pay royalties on the minerals they pull from the ground. How will that affect the Northwest? Guy Hand reports.


A Seattle woman fights Aids in Africa (2007-11-05)
You don't have to be a millionaire to become a philanthropist. One Seattle woman of modest means is proof of that. She started and runs a global foundation out of the bedroom of her University District apartment.


School Safety Drills (2007-11-05)
Schools in Washington State are going to be paying more attention to safety in the coming year. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing explains.


Police Guild Addresses Accountability Panel (2007-11-05)
The Seattle Police Officers' Guild says it is not against strong citizen oversight or a fair discipline system. But the city can't just legislate changes to their contract. Guild President Rich O'Neill is addressing the mayor's review panel at city hall tonight. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:11)


After the Mayors Climate Summit (2007-11-05)
It's Monday morning, more than two days since over a hundred mayors from cities around the U.S. ended their first-ever national summit on climate change. The speeches have all been given, the backs have all been slapped, the celebrities have all gone home. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty takes a look at what happens now


Supersized Flyers (2007-11-05)
Have you noticed that those political flyers in your mailbox seem to be taking up more space? KPLU's Paula Wissel looks into why so many mailers seem to have been supersized.


School Safety Drills (2007-11-05)
Schools in Washington State are going to be paying more attention to safety in the coming year. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing explains.


Local Group Eyes Sonics (2007-11-03)
A group of local investors say they're serious about buying the Seattle Sonics and keeping the team in town. On Friday, team chairman Clay Bennett asked the NBA for permission to move the team to Oklahoma City. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Clinton, Mayors to Collaborate on Climate Change (2007-11-02)
Global warming is not only an historic challenge; it's an unprecedented economic opportunity. That was among the messages delivered by former President Bill Clinton to the Mayor's Climate Protection Summit in Seattle last night. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Measuring Climate Impact (2007-11-02)
Forty-six Northwest cities have signed a pledge to cut their global warming pollution below 1990 levels. Mayors from the Northwest and across the country continue to meet in Seattle today to swap tips on reaching that goal. It'll be tough. KPLU's Tom Banse reports, there's not even a common yardstick for measuring progress.


Scandals Bedevil Republican Party (2007-11-02)
The list is growing of Northwest politicians caught up in gay sex scandals in recent years. The latest is State Representative Richard Curtis who resigned this week. So What's the GOP to do? KPLU's Austin Jenkins put that question to three party observers, in this in-depth report.


Sonics' Owners Want Out (2007-11-02)
The Oklahoma-owners of the Seattle Sonics say they want to move the team their hometown. Team chairman Clay Bennett has asked NBA to allow the move to Oklahoma City. The request came after a group of local investors announced they'd like to talk to Bennett about buying the Sonics. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Fallout Over Gay Sex Scandal? (2007-11-02)
Here's a headline Republicans don't want to see: GOP lawmaker resigns amid gay sex scandal. It happened this week in Washington. But will there be political consequences for the party? KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


New York's Bloomberg Rallies Mayors (2007-11-02)
The mayor of America's biggest city was in Seattle Friday, talking to more than 100 mayors at a national summit on climate change. Michael Bloomberg pushed for new federal policies to promote clean energy and reduce greenhouse gases. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty was there


Thiel on A-Rod: Extended Web Version (2007-11-02)
Former Mariner Alex Rodriguez is in hot water with baseball fans again. A-Rod angered Mariner fans when he signed a 10-year, $252-million-dollar contract with the Texas Rangers in 2000 - making him the highest-paid player in professional sports history. The latest controversy surrounds the announcement of his free agency from the Yankees - during Game 4 of the World Series. It's the topic of KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick's conversation this week with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Salmon Plan Criticized (2007-11-01)
The federal government has a new plan to restore endangered Columbia and Snake River salmon runs. It's the latest attempt by President Bush to come up with a viable recovery solution. As KPLU's Tom Banse reports, it's already been met with sharp criticism.


Mayors Talk Climate in Seattle (2007-11-01)
Former Vice President and Nobel Laureate Al Gore spoke to more than 100 mayors from across the country gathered in Seattle Thursday. They're attending a national summit on how cities are tackling the challenge of climate change. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty was there


Lawmaker Resigns (2007-11-01)
Republican leaders in Southwest Washington will choose a successor for State Representative Richard Curtis of La Center. Curtis resigned his seat yesterday amid a gay sex scandal. He says he doesn't want to subject his family to any more pain. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more.


Kennewick Man Legislation (2007-11-01)
"Kennewick Man" should stay put in a museum, according to eastern Washington congressman Doc Hastings. He's introduced a bill to protect scientists' ability to study the ancient remains, which are housed in Seattle. More from KPLU's Anna King.


Serbian and Irish Students in Seattle (2007-11-01)
Teenagers from Serbia and northern Ireland are filling a few Seattle high school classrooms this week. They're visiting as part of cultural exchange program. They learning about American culture and helping American students understand their own complex ethnic identities. Chana Joffe-Walt visited the program at Roosevelt high school:


Money Fund Troubles (2007-11-01)
Many people think money funds are safe places to put your cash and earn a competitive interest rate. But there's an element of risk involved. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein recently pulled his money out of a fund that ran into trouble. He spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Political Ad Trends (2007-10-31)
Local candidates are getting better at grabbing your attention. That's because it's a lot easier and cheaper than it used to be for campaigns to target you based on where you live or what you're interested in. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports.


Secret Life of Bats (2007-10-31)
Ask a biologist what's the least understood of all mammals, chances are the answer will be bats. The Northwest is home to at least 15 species, only one of which has a call that's audible to the human ear. High tech gizmos are shining more light on the secret life of the region's bats. KPLU's Tom Banse takes us on a nighttime fieldtrip.


Substitute House Joint Resolution 4215 (2007-10-31)
Most people who have investments, diversify. A little bit in bonds, some in stocks and maybe real estate. A measure on the November ballot wants to make this possible for the state's universities. KPLU's Jennifer Wing reports.


Adapting Stormwater Systems to Climate Change (2007-10-30)
You hear all about efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming. But what about the global warming it may be too late to avoid? This week, engineers and policymakers from around the region are gathered in Seattle. They're looking at ways of adapting to the climate change that could already be arriving on our doorstep. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Security Lags at Nuclear Facilities (2007-10-30)
A Washington, D.C. watchdog group is again warning that the nation's nuclear facilities are not secure enough. This includes Hanford in Washington and the Idaho National Laboratory. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Voter Turnout Prediction (2007-10-30)
Have you mailed in your ballot yet? The Secretary of State is predicting just how likely you are to get around to it. KPLU's Paula Wissel has more on the projections for voter turnout.


A Halloween that is Healthy? (2007-10-30)
For kids, tomorrow night, Halloween, is about hitting as many houses as you can and crossing your fingers for the king size stuff. Then you stay up late to see how deep you can go into a candy coma. Well, for some children that may be about to change. The Puget Sound region is home to a growing Green Halloween movement. Parents are saying Halloween doesn't have to be all about consumption. Instead it can be about health and the environment. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


Meaning of Work - Funeral Director (2007-10-29)
How did a highly successful computer salesman find himself a more fulfilling job as a funeral director? KPLU's Gary Davis introduces us to a Texas transplant who found his calling among the grieving.


JR8206: WA Rainy Day Fund? (2007-10-29)
What can a state do to avoid a financial crisis? Here in Washington, lawmakers approved a constitutionally-protected rainy day fund. But voters will get the final say. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has an in-depth report on Joint Resolution 8206.


The WASL Seniors (2007-10-29)
There's a lot of talk lately about the Class of 2008. They're the first students required to pass sections of the WASL to graduate high school. Administrators call them the guinea pig class. They're talked about in legislative sessions and PTA meetings. But what about the students themselves? What's it like to be 18, to be guinea pigs, to watch the rules change around you? KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt introduces us to Tukwilla senior Britney LaBoyne:


Dropout Factories (2007-10-29)
Just about every public high school has dropouts. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University say it's a major problem for schools in Tacoma. KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing tells us they are being called dropout factories.


National Forest "Green Certification" (2007-10-29)
Would you feel better about your National Forests if they got a green seal of approval from an independent auditor? A non-profit forestry group just did a study to see whether national forest logging would qualify for green certification. KPLU's Tom Banse has the findings.


Referendum 67 (2007-10-29)
For Washington voters, it's de ja vu all over again. Insurance companies and trial lawyers are duking it out over a state wide ballot measure. Consumers are stuck in the middle. Two years ago it was over medical malpractice reform. This time the fight is over how much insurance companies should be penalized when they deny a legitimate claim. As part of our week-long election series, KPLU's Austin Jenkins brings us this analysis of Washington Referendum 67.


FBI Checking Names (2007-10-29)
Whenever someone applies to become a United States citizen, their name is checked against a terrorism watch list. Now, a group of applicants is suing. They say the process is taking too long. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


Citizenship Lawsuit (2007-10-29)
Four Seattle area residents who are waiting to become citizens are suing the United States government. They say the delay in granting them citizenship is unreasonable and illegal. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has more.


Velazquez Faces DUI Charge (2007-10-29)
Seattle City Council candidate Venus Velazquez is facing a charge of driving under the influence. She has apologized for what she refers to as "a bad call," and says she hopes voters will judge her by the entirety of her record. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has more.


Fisher Reintroduction Plan (2007-10-29)
A hundred years ago, the Olympic Peninsula had a thriving population of the dark brown, weasel-like animals known as fishers. Prized for their pelts, fishers were wiped out by trapping, and clearcut logging that fragmented their habitat. Now, state and federal wildlife managers hope to bring the fisher back, starting in Olympic National Park. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Proposition 1: Roads and Transit (2007-10-26)
Proposition 1 is the most wide-ranging transportation proposal in state history. The Roads and Transit ballot measure asks taxpayers in King, Pierce and Snohomish Counties for tens of billions of dollars over the next 5 decades. The money would buy highway improvements across the region and 50 miles of light rail. But the political compromise that seemed a good bet a few months ago could be in trouble as Election Day approaches. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty gives us an overview .


Thiel on Sonics Season (2007-10-26)
The Sonics begin their regular season in Denver Wednesday (Oct. 31). If the pre-season is any indication, it's not going to be a banner year for the team. But it needs to be, according to Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel. That's the topic of his conversation this week with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick.


Rossi Announces (2007-10-26)
Call it Rematch 2008. Republican Dino Rossi has made his campaign for governor official. Rossi hopes t be his party's nominee and take on Governor Chris Gregoire. Rossi narrowly lost to Gregoire in 2004. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more on the announcement.


Job Does Not Equal Comfort in King County (2007-10-26)
You've got a good job but you can't scrape together the cash to throw your kid a birthday party. You just got paid but all your money is gone. Ever feel like this? A new Workforce Development Council report says if you're working and still broke, you're not alone. Chana Joffe-Walt has the story:


Rossi Kicks-Off (2007-10-26)
Republican Dino Rossi says it's time to look to the future, not dwell on his narrow loss in 2004. Rossi fromally announced yesterday that he will run in an effort to unseat Governor Chris Gregoire. Gregoire narrowly defeated rossi in 2004. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Men Wanted...to Stop Domestic Violence (2007-10-26)
October is domestic violence awareness month. The region's victim advocates are celebrating increased services and protections. But they're also calling for more prevention programs. And they're saying to really prevent violence they need men to help. Chana Joffe-Walt reports: http://communities.southsound.com/main.wsi?group_id=34]


Private Money For Public Schools? (2007-10-25)
The Seattle School board may be facing a dramatic change. Four of the seven seats are up for grabs. The candidates tend to agree on many of the issues but there is one perennial issue that continues to divide. Money. KPLU's Education Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Red Cross Volunteers Head to CA (2007-10-25)
Red Cross vlunteers from every major city in the Northwest are leapfrogging the small convoy of local fire trucks headed to SOuthern California. The Red Cross volunteers will help at wildfire evacuation shelters and feeding stateions. KPLU's Tom Banse spoke to one before she got on a plane.


GDP and Fed Preview (2007-10-25)
Will it be a scary Halloween on Wall Street? Two major announcements come out October 31st: the Gross Domestic Product for the third quarter and the Federal Reserve's latest action on interest rates. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein tells KPLU's Dave Meyer what to expect.


Race for King County Prosecutor (2007-10-25)
For the first time in decades, there's a competitive race for King County Prosecutor. Voters will decide who will replace the late Norm Maleng. The man whose name was practically synonymous with the office died of a heart attack in May. The choice is between Maleng's right hand man and a relative newcomer who promises a fresh approach. KPLU's Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


Food for Thought: Condiments (2007-10-24)
What goes on your hotdog or spring roll? On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein discuss their favorite condiments.


Costco Stops Selling Studded Tires (2007-10-24)
The Costco warehouse store chain has decided to stop selling studded snow tires. KPLU's Tom Banse has the reasoning and reaction.


Microsoft Buying Stake in Facebook (2007-10-24)
A long-rumored deal is now confirmed. Microsoft is investing two hundred forty million dollars ($240 m) in the social networking site, Facebook. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:15)


Kreidler Seeks Major Insurance Reform (2007-10-24)
Lawmakers will debate a new plan for universal health benefits when they convene in January. State Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler says his proposal will provide help for more than 600-thousand in the state without coverage. KPLU's Health and Science reporter Gary Davis has more.


Seattle Lawyers Suing Clear Channel (2007-10-24)
If you feel like ticket prices to rock concerts have gone up a lot over the past few years, you're not alone. A Seattle law firm is leading a class action against Clear Channel Entertainment and its successor, the concert promoter Live Nation. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:10)


Seattle School Board - Morris vs. Blomstrom (2007-10-23)
School closures, neighborhood schools, the achievement gap .all part of the language of the Seattle School Board races. When the candidates talk about these issues, they all generally agree. Except in District 3 - north-central Seattle. That race has been one of the most interesting -- largely because the two candidates are never seen in the same room together. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


SJR 8212 - Private Hiring Of Inmates (2007-10-23)
Washington law says prison inmates should work for the benefit of the state. But should they be employed by for-profit companies in jobs that pay minimum wage and higher? That's a question Washington voters face as they consider a constitutional amendment on the ballot. Senate Joint Resolution 82-12 would re-authorize private employers to set up shop inside prison walls. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has the story. (3:45)


Shock Therapy for Sea Lions (2007-10-23)
It'll be at least a year before Washington, Oregon, and Idaho find out if they get permission to kill some of the sea lions that are feasting on endangered Columbia Basin salmon. In the meantime, other ideas to keep the sea lions at bay are being entertained. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on a proposed experiment to zap the pesky predators with mild electric pulses.


Amazon.com's Sales and Profiits Surge (2007-10-23)
Amazon dot com started as a newfangled bookseller. It's become a place to get just about anything online. That strategy is apparently working. The Seattle company has more than quadrupled its profits compared with a year ago. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:01)


Contruction Resumes at Hanford (2007-10-23)
Construction has resumed on key parts of a Hanford waste treatment plant in Southeast Washington. This is the project that's supposed to turn highly-radioactive tank waste into safer glass logs. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Keeping Tobacco Out of Reach (2007-10-23)
It's illegal to sell tobacco to anyone under 18 in Washington State. But that doesn't always stop kids from buying a pack of cigarettes at their local grocery store. KPLU's Jennifer Wing tells us what one of the largest retailers in the state is doing to stop those transactions from happening.


Graveyard of the Pacific (2007-10-23)
The Columbia River surges into the Pacific Ocean at a long and narrow passage known as the Bar. The sea floor below is littered with the debris of thousands of ships. This treacherous crossing is crucial for international commerce in the northwest. In the final installment of out series on the Columbia River, KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson introduces us to a team of master seamen. They bear the dangerous responsibility of guiding ships safely past "The Graveyard of the Pacific."


Amazon.com Profits Quadruple (2007-10-23)
One Seattle company is apparently immune to national worries about consumer spending. Internet retailer Amazon dot com reports its quarterly profits have quadrupled compared with a year ago. KPLU Business and Labor Reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has the story. (1:00)


Mini-sub Inspection Planned at BC Diesel Spill (2007-10-22)
A mini-submarine will be sent to examine logging equipment that fell into Johnstone Strait in British Columbia nearly two months ago. The accident created a diesel fuel spill in an orca whale reserve off northeastern Vancouver Island. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has this update


Trial Continues for Former WSU Student (2007-10-22)
The vehicular homicide trial resumes today for a former WSU student who was a fugitive in Ireland before his capture. 28-year old Frederick Russel is charged with killing three fellow students in a fiery car crash in 2001. KPLU's Austin Jenkins spoke with the mother of one of the victims.


Science Fiction Author Greg Bear (2007-10-22)
Lynnwood is home to one of the nation's best-selling science fiction writers. Greg Bear's books include the award-winning "Moving Mars and Darwin's Radio". His latest novel is "Quantico". When he's not writing, he sometimes advises the government about possible terrorist scenarios. He's even been on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. KPLU's Dave Meyer profiles Greg Bear in this week's installment of our series, The Meaning of Work.


Science Fiction Author Greg Bear Web Extra (2007-10-22)
In this bonus interview, Greg Bear talks with Dave Meyer about hard science fiction, the prospect of turning his books into movies, and the future in general.


Initiative 960 - Curbing Government? (2007-10-22)
Washington's "initiative king" Tim Eyman is back. This time he's urging voters to approve I-960. It says the legislature must pass all tax increases with a two-thirds vote. It also says the legislature, not state agencies, must approve all fee increases. Eyman calls it "The Taxpayer Protection Initiative." Opponenst call it unconstitutional. As a part of KPLU's week long election series, KPLU's Austin Jenkins has our voters' guide to Initiative 960.


WA & CA to Sue Bush Administration (2007-10-19)
Washington and Oregon plan to join California in a lawsuit against the Bush administration. At issue is whether California's tough, new auto emission standards can go into effect. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


"Credit University" Teaching Teens to Save (2007-10-19)
Good money habits are hard to teach kids. But one local program is making big strides. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Boatyards Clean Up Stormwater (2007-10-19)
An unusual partnership between the boating industry, environmental watchdogs and the state may lead to cleaner water in Puget Sound. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Boatyards Clean Up Stormwater (2007-10-19)
An unusual partnership between the boating industry, environmental watchdogs and the state may lead to cleaner water in Puget Sound. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Thiel on UW, WSU Football (2007-10-19)
College football fans are not happy with the way the things are going at the University of Washington and Washington State this year. Should the head coaches suffer the consequences? That's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Credit University Teaching Teens to Save (2007-10-19)
Good money habits are hard to teach kids. But one local program is making big strides. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:03)


Thiel on UW, WSU Football (2007-10-19)
College football fans are not happy with the way the things are going at the University of Washington and Washington State this year. Should the head coaches suffer the consequences? That's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Thiel on UW, WSU Football (2007-10-19)
College football fans are not happy with the way the things are going at the University of Washington and Washington State this year. Should the head coaches suffer the consequences? That's the topic of this week's conversation between KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel.


Superintendents Want Simple Majority (2007-10-19)
Washington state school superintendents threw a little party today. They gathered from 35 different districts to support Resolution 4204. It would change the state constitution to allow 50 percent of voters to pass property-tax levies for schools. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


Solar Energy Station Goes Live (2007-10-18)
The Pacific Northwest's largest solar power station goes online this week. The Wild Horse project sits atop a mountain outside of Ellensburg. It's the same site that sports the largest wind project in Washington. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Amazon Expectations (2007-10-18)
Next week is a big week for corporate profits and losses. Most companies will be reporting their third quarter earnings. In Northwest stocks, financial commentator Greg Heberlein thinks Amazon.com will be the one to watch. He spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Taskforce on Sex Offenders (2007-10-18)
A governor-appointed task force has issued its final report on sex offenders. This follows the kidnapping and murder of a Tacoma girl last summer. The suspect in the death of 12-year old Zina Linnik is a convicted pedophile who was not registered. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Prison Escapee Captured (2007-10-18)
A convicted murderer from Washington who escaped a private prison in Arizona has been captured. 37-year old Roy Townsend was nabbed near Spokane late Tuesday. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


McIver Charged with Domestic Abuse (2007-10-17)
Seattle City Councilman Richard McIver will be tried for domestic violence. He is pleading not guilty to grabbing his wife's throat and arm in a drunken dispute. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt was in the King County courtroom and has our story:


Food for Thought: Omakase Sushi (2007-10-17)
On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein of the joys of putting oneself in the hands of the chef.


Students Say No to Credit Card Traps (2007-10-17)
Don't listen to the guy with the free beer. That's the message of a new anti-credit card marketing campaign at the University of Washington and Evergreen College. Organizers want students to be savvy about credit card marketing tactics. Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


Snake River Tugboats (2007-10-16)
Every year, tug boats push millions of tons of products like wheat, barley, potatoes, and sawdust up and down the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This maritime highway stretches 465 miles from the mouth of the Columbia to Lewiston, Idaho, the most inland port on the West coast. In part three of our series on the modern day Columbia River system, KPLU's Austin Jenkins explores the commerce on this river from aboard a tug pushing barges down the Snake.


School Board Candidates on Art (2007-10-16)
Seattle School Board candidates are used to talking about the achievement gap, mathematics and school closures. But it's not often they get asked about art. Last night at a Seattle Arts Commission sponsored forum, art got the spotlight. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt was there:


First Female Head of DOT (2007-10-16)
Washington State has a new Secretary of Transportation. She's Paula Hammond, the first woman to head the DOT. She takes the reins just as an audit report says the Deparment needs to focus more on easing congestion and building highway lanes. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Big Rig Checkpoints (2007-10-15)
How safe is that big-rig rolling down the highway next to you? if two recent dragnets are any indication, one in four tractor-trailors shouldn't be on the road. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Renton Teaches Math to Teachers (2007-10-15)
Puget Sound students hunch over problems in math classes every week. Now Renton school teachers will do the same -- in a math academy for teachers. There's a lack of math teachers everywhere. Renton thinks it has found a solution. KPLU Education Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


Meaning of Work: Mailman (2007-10-15)
Everyday at least one person visits your home. Not a friend, or a neighbor, but the mailman. You may have never even met this daily visitor, but chances or he - or she - knows you. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt walked the route with Seattle mail carrier Andrea Demajewsky.


Kittitas County Sues State (2007-10-12)
Who has the right to approve massive wind farms? That's the focus of a lawsuit against the state. Kittitas COunty says it should be able to decide which projects are built within its borders. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Thiel on Mack Strong (2007-10-12)
The Seahawks are trying to adjust to life without longtime fullback Mack Strong. Strong announced his retirement this week, following a neck injury suffered in last Sunday's game against Pittsburgh. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about what this means for the team.


Drive-Thru Flu Shots (2007-10-12)
Not enough of us are getting our annual flu shot. The Centers for Disease Control wants the nation's clinics to help increase immunization rates. So one local provider will double its efforts on a gimmick they've used with success. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


Traffic Jam? Build More Lanes (2007-10-11)
If you really want to reduce traffic jams, build more highway lanes. That's a key finding in what's sure to be a controversial new report on congestion by the state auditor. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Governor's Race Heats Up (2007-10-11)
Get ready for a rough and tumble 2008 Governor's race in Washington. The candidates haven't even declared they're running, but already the political bombs are dropping. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Two Tumbles and a Jump (2007-10-11)
The stock market has been rising in recent weeks despite problems in the banking industry. Why? It's all because of a phenomenon known as two tumbles and a jump . Financial commentator Greg Heberlein explains it to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Struggle to Keep Latinos in School (2007-10-11)
Latinos drop out of school at higher rates than any other minority group. That stark reality brought a Microsoft engineer Ziola Haro [ZOY - lah Ha-roe] to White Center's Cascade Middle School in Seattle to talk about dreaming big. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


Dancing With the 'Scars' (2007-10-11)
A breast cancer diagnosis is scary enough once. But imagine going through treatment and recovery only to have it return. Playwright and author Tania Katan had her first mastectomy at 21, her second at 31. Katan's book about her experience, My One Night Stand With Cancer is a humorous account of her illness, and her decision to celebrate the scars of her surgery. Katan adapted her book for the stage. Her solo show opens October 12th at Seattle's ACT Theatre. KPLU's Gary Davis has her story.


McIver Accused of Domestic Violence (2007-10-10)
Seattle City Councilmember Richard McIver has been accused of domestic violence. According to a police report, his wife called 9-1-1 in the middle of the night saying her husband had grabbed her by the throat and arm yelling profanities. City leaders are watching the case closely. Local domestic violence organizations are too, saying the response to the charge will send an important message. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


Investigating A Plane Crash (2007-10-10)
Rescue crews have recovered the bodies of 10 people who died in a plane crash Sunday; about 25 miles southeast of Mt. Rainier. KPLU's Anna King traveled to the site of the investigation Tuesday and filed this report.


Dreamliner Delayed (2007-10-10)
Boeing has announced a six-month delay in the first flight and delivery of the new 787 Dreamliner jet - due to problems with assembly at its factory in Everett. More on the story from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:07)


Food for Thought: Breakfast (2007-10-10)
Breakfast is supposed to start off your day, right? Well, that's not the case for Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson or KPLU's Dick Stein, as we find out on today's Food for Thought.


Boeing Delays Completion of 787 (2007-10-10)
Boeing has announced it's delaying the first flight and delivery of its new 787 airplane. The Dreamliner will come six months later than originally planned. More from KPLU business and labor reporter, Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:03)


Skydiving Community in Mourning (2007-10-10)
There are just 1500 registered skydivers in our region and by all accounts it's a close-knit community, one that's now in mourning. KPLU's Austin Jenkins spoke with the owner of an Oregon skydiving company.


DUI Cases at Risk (2007-10-09)
Defense attorneys in Washington want breath test results thrown-out in dozens, if not hundreds, of drunk driving arrests. They say the breathalyzer results are in doubt because of errors and misconduct in the state's toxicology lab. The latest on this story from KPLU's Austin Jenkins.


Dangerous Dam for Fish (2007-10-09)
For those who track the health and well-being of fish in this region, Columbia River dams are known as "fish killers." But in fact the deadliest dam isn't a dam at all, it's a 76-mile reservoir that pools behind a dam east of The Dalles, Oregon. Last week, KPLU's Austin Jenkins explored the hidden history of the Columbia River by kyak. In today's part II of our series Roll on Columbia, KPLU's Anna King takes a closer look at the John Day reservoir.


Scott Simon Tells The Story (2007-10-09)
When it comes to telling a good story, NPR's Scott Simon is one of the best. The long-time host of Saturday's Weekend Edition has won top journalism awards. He was in Seattle this week to accept another award. The Krista Foundation supports humanitarian work by young adults both here and abroad. Simon was given the foundation's Global Citizen Award for what it calls his humor, grace and journalistic rigor in an often unjust world.' KPLU's Gary Davis talks with Scott Simon about his craft.


Missing Plane Found; All Believed Killed (2007-10-09)
At least seven people are dead and three others missing after the wreck of a small plane Sunday night in the Goat Rocks Wilderness southeast of Mt. Rainier. Rescue workers found the plane yesterday after a day-long search. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


ER Docs Against 'Boarding' (2007-10-09)
If you seek urgent health care at your local emergency room, don't be surprised if you see some patients being treated on gurneys lining the hallways and corridors. It's a practice called boarding,' and E-R doctors -- meeting in Seattle -- say it's a growing trend that has to stop. More from KPLU health & science reporter Gary Davis.


Wage Gap Widens (2007-10-09)
If you feel like it's getting harder to make ends meet, you're not alone. A new report shows that the cost of living in Washington has increased dramatically over the past five years. And it's outpacing wage growth. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:07)


Living Wage Survey (2007-10-09)
The skyrocketing cost of healthcare is making it difficult for average people to make ends meet in Washington. One group's study says the state's new minimum wage of almost eight dollars an hour is not nearly enough. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:01)


More NW Spud Exports (2007-10-09)
Whether it's tots, hashbrowns, or plain old fries, Washington state produces more frozen potato snacks than anywhere else in the world. And demand is growing, as KPLU's Anna King explains.


Meaning of Work: Veterinarians (2007-10-08)
Emergency surgery. Close calls. End-of-life decisions. Those are things people in the medical profession deal with on a daily basis. But what if your patient can't tell you where it hurts? For veterinarians, that's one of the challenges of the job, as KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick found out from Dr. Jeb Mortimer, who happens to be her dog's vet.


ER Doctors Meet in Seattle (2007-10-08)
Talk to an emergency room doctor and they'll tell you they see a system unprepared to handle a major disaster, and one that compromises health care for the poor. More than five-thousand of the nation's E-R doctors are meeting in Seattle this week to talk about the state of emergency care. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


Search for Missing Skydivers (2007-10-08)
The air and ground search resumes this morning for ten people on board a plane that disappeared Sunday evening in the Cascades, southeast of Mt. Rainier. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


White Parents, Children of Color (2007-10-08)
Who should adopt which child? Can white parents raise an African-American boy? Or an Asian baby girl? Seattle's Central District Forum wants to start a conversation about these questions. This week it begins with a forum called Transracial Adoption. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


Preparing the Elderly for Winter (2007-10-08)
Last winter thousands were left in the dark and basements flooded when heavy rains and windstorms hit Puget Sound. Now counties are saying it may be coming again, and this time, let's not be caught off guard. Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


Key to Mortgages: Education (2007-10-08)
Numerous mortgage companies have gone out of business. One of the reasons is a lack of education on the part of both lenders and borrowers. What's being done to correct this situation? KPLU's John Maynard talks with Richard Hagar, a Seattle-based educator and appraiser who teaches courses on real estate and mortgage fraud prevention.


Indictments in Rogue Makah Whale Hunt (2007-10-05)
A federal grand jury has handed down indictments on the five Makah Indians alleged to have killed a gray whale near Neah Bay last month. Prosecutors say tribal officials have cooperated with the investigation and they're satisfied the tribe didn't know the men planned an unauthorized hunt. But as KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports, there may still be repercussions for the Makah.


Region's Next Big Thing: Gaming (2007-10-05)
If you want to help a young person find a promising career, you might encourage them to get good at video games. Interactive media have become one of the biggest and fastest growing industries in the Pacific Northwest. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Rider Case Spurring Changes (2007-10-05)
King County Sheriff Sue Rahr says she wants to see changes in how her office handles missing persons cases. The suggestions come after the disappearance of Tanya Rider, who was trapped in her car for eight days before authorities used cell phone records to find her. More on the story from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:46)


Art Thiel Wraps the M's (2007-10-05)
For much of the major league baseball season, it looked as though the Seattle Mariners might make the playoffs. But the team finished a few games short of a wild-card berth. Commentator Art Thiel, a sports columnist with the Seattle P-I, says the Mariners can improve, but may have to get worse before they win a pennant. He spoke with KPLU's Gary Davis.


Babies Take Over Seattle Nightclubs (2007-10-04)
Having a baby changes your life. No more late night clubs and sleeping in until lunch. It's diapers, Barney and playgroups. Increasingly young parents are saying baby-making doesn't have to mean your life as a hot, hipster is over. You can still roll up to the club - just bring your stroller. Chana Joffe-Walt takes us to a dance party for babies and their parents:


Smoking Policy Summit (2007-10-04)
If you want to quit smoking, living in the Pacific Northwest may help. Washington has become a model for states around the country. Seattle is the first stop on a national tour for a smoking policy summit that takes place today (Thursday, 10-4-07.) More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:58)


Feds Charge Rogue Makah Whalers (2007-10-04)
Five Makah Indians are facing federal charges stemming from an unauthorized whale hunt last month. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Third Quarter NW Stocks (2007-10-04)
The third quarter was nothing to brag about for many Northwest stocks. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein goes over the numbers with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Libraries Want World War II Stories (2007-10-03)
More than a thousand World War 2 vets die everyday according to the Department of Veteran affairs. A new program at Snohomish and Island County libraries seeks to honor surviving vets before they are gone. They are setting out to capture their oral histories. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


Food for Thought: Unfamiliar Menu Items (2007-10-03)
Ever look at a menu item, think "what is that?" and were then embarrassed to ask? Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson is here to help on today's Food for Thought.


Slade Gorton on Saving the Sonics (2007-10-03)
Seattle wants to keep its pro basketball team in their city-owned home at KeyArena. And it's preparing to fight the Sonics Oklahoma-based owners in court to hold them to the lease, which runs through 2010. Former U-S Senator Slade Gorton is the city's legal counsel in the suit. He spoke with KPLU's Gary Davis.


Speed Dating the Candidates (2007-10-03)
In the coming November election, voters will choose between over a dozen candidates. It can be hard to know who's who and what's what. In Seattle, voters are looking to a new way to sort it all out. Speed dating with the candidates. Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


Keystone Ferry Will Be Saved (2007-10-02)
Old age has been taking its toll on the four ferries that connect Port Townsend and Whidbey Island. It will be very costly to replace them. But the chair of the state senate's transportation committee says she is certain the Keystone Ferry line will be saved. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:26)


Environmentalists Clash Over Prop 1 (2007-10-02)
There are environmental groups on both sides of the Roads and Transit proposition headed for voters this November. But Roads and Transit backers say that discord shouldn't confuse voters who want to protect the environment. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Rescue Tug Back on Duty (2007-10-02)
The tugboat stationed at the mouth of the Strait of Juan de Fuca to help prevent oil spills is back on duty. Funding for the tug runs out next spring, and there's no plan yet to pay for a permanent replacement. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


The Modern Day Columbia River (2007-10-02)
The Columbia River is often called the lifeblood of the Pacific Northwest. It flows 12-hundred miles from British Columbia, through the inland Northwest, to the Pacific Ocean. A hundred years ago the Columbia was a free-flowing river. Today it's tamed by no fewer than a dozen dams. In PART ONE of a series on the modern day Columbia River system, KPLU's Austin Jenkins takes us on a canoe trip in Northeastern Washington. Today we go searching for history that's hard to find.


Gregoire "Surprised" by Sims on Proposition 1 (2007-10-01)
Governor Chris Gregoire says she's surprised that King County Executive Ron Sims has taken a public stand against Proposition 1. That's the Roads and Transit tax-hike measure on next month's ballot. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Calling 911 (2007-10-01)
When you dial 911, Karen Long is one of the people who answers. She talks with KPLU Reporter Paula Wissel about the job.


Teacher Wishlists Online (2007-10-01)
LEAD: Classrooms across the northwest are filling up with books, binders and pencils. Those supplies cost money. That has teachers turning to the Internet for help with the cost of running a classroom. KPLU Education Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt has the story: [a target="new"href="adoptaclassroom.com">Adopt-a-Classroom [a target="new"href="donorschoose.org">Donors Choose


South Sound Tough on Baby Salmon (2007-10-01)
South Puget Sound appears to be taking a heavy toll on young salmon on their way out to sea, but researchers say they don't know why. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Gregoire "Surprised" by Sims (2007-10-01)
Governor Chris Gregoire says she's surprised that King County Executive Ron Sims has taken a public stand against Proposition 1. That's the Roads and Transit tax-hike measure on next month's ballot. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Keystone Ferry Future Uncertain (2007-10-01)
The future of the Keystone ferry line is in jeopardy. The boats that serve the run between Port Townsend and Whidbey Island are all eighty years old and nearing the end of their useful life. But there's no plan yet to replace them. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:08)


Muslim Humanitarian Day (2007-09-28)
Homeless clients of Seattle's Millionaire Club will have the chance to meet their Muslim neighbors and receive free medical screenings tomorrow (Saturday). It's all part of something called Humanitarian Day for the Homeless. KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis explains.


Court Death Penalty Ruling (2007-09-28)
Just because the Green River Killer escaped the death penalty doesn't mean other, less prolific, killers should also be spared. That's the ruling yesterday from the State Supreme Court in the case of serial killer Robert Yates Jr. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Boeing Surplus Store Closing (2007-09-28)
For decades, it's been a great resource for bargain-hunters in the Northwest. Boeing's surplus store in Kent offers deals on everything from desks to circuit boards. The company is closing the store at the end of the year - but that isn't stopping one man from trying to save it. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:02)


Thiel on Seattle vs. Sonics (2007-09-28)
A lot of people are wondering what's going to happen next, now that the Sonics and the city of Seattle are locked in a legal battle over the team's lease at KeyArena. Owner Clay Bennett is demanding arbitration and the city has countered with a lawsuit. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Theil about mistakes that he feels both sides have made.


Hanford Workers May Get Compensation (2007-09-27)
A federal agency has recommended compensation for additional workers who were sickened by radiation exposure at the Hanford nuclear site. Those former workers could automatically receive 150-thousand dollars if they develop certain kinds of cancer. KPLU's Tom Banse has details.


Viaduct Projects Proposed (2007-09-27)
It's been more than six months since Seattle's rancorous viaduct vote. Now, transportation officials want to build the non-controversial parts of a replacement while political leaders hammer out a final design the public can support. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Sex Offender Tracking (2007-09-27)
It's been more than a year since the Washington legislature approved GPS tracking of sex offenders. But only now is Governor Chris Gregoire dipping into emergency funds to jump-start the program. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Expansion Plans for Virginia Mason (2007-09-27)
A future where hospital patients can get services without having to go from building-to-building -- or even floor-to-floor. That's the vision behind expansion plans at Seattle's Virginia Mason Medical Center. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


Quietest Place in US (2007-09-27)
Deep in the Hoh Rian Forest in Olympic National Park is a place so quiet, one man has dubbed it the quietest spot in the US. He's given it that title in his quest to preserve solitude in the country's national parks. He'll even write complaint letters to airlins that fly their planes over the park and sometimes he gets results. KPLU's Tom Banse profiles one man's desire to preserve the natural soundscape.


Your Retirement Nest Egg (2007-09-27)
Imagine you've saved up your nest egg and are ready to retire. What's the safest way to invest that money and earn income? Financial commentator Greg Heberlein tells KPLU's Dave Meyer there are three main options to look at.


Escaped Murderer Still on the Lam (2007-09-26)
A convicted murderer from Washington is still on the lam - a week after he broke-out of a private prison in Arizona. It's the first time a Washington inmate has escaped from an out-of-state lock-up. Arizona authorities and the US Marshals office are tracking down leads. But what is Washington's role? KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


U.S. Rep Smith Wants End to Global Poverty (2007-09-26)
A new law would make the fight to reduce global poverty a policy goal for the U. S. government. It's just passed out of the House of Representatives. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:07)


Viaduct Replacement Update (2007-09-26)
The public is being asked to weigh in on a proposed road design that would replace 40 percent of Seattle's Alaskan Way Viaduct. More from KPLUs Liam Moriarty


Seattle Movie Outsourced Debuts (2007-09-26)
Offshore outsourcing is often a topic of controversy. A new Seattle movie tackles the topic with a light touch. Outsourced tells the story of a call-center manager who has to lay off his entire staff and then travel to India to train his replacement. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp sat down with the film's director, John Jeffcoat.


Washington Students Moving Slowly (2007-09-26)
A new national report card lines up Washington students next to students from around the country. As KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports, there's good news and there's bad news:


Food For Thought: Cooking Class (2007-09-26)
There are lots of opportunities for culinary education in the Puget Sound area; as Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Alternatives to Alternative Fuels (2007-09-25)
Growing canola to make biodiesel isn't exactly setting Northwest farmers' hearts aflutter. Government statistics show just a slight increase in canola plantings, despite layers of incentives to support homegrown fuel. Plant breeders and university researchers in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho keep plugging away to find more options for area growers. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on what we might call alternative "alternative fuel crops."


The Making of a Rural Doc (2007-09-25)
Throughout the Northwest, rural comunities are in a constant struggle to attract and keep doctors. To practice in a remote area is to embrace a life of long hours, professional isolation, and lower pay. The region's medical school has a program dedicated to helping students see the upside of rural practice, too. In the second of her two part series, KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson chronicles the journey of one medical student as she gets her first real taste of what rural medicine is all about


Global Poverty Act Passes U.S. House (2007-09-25)
Extreme poverty around the globe is a threat to our national security and should be stopped. That's the idea behind a proposed new law that's just passed the U.S. House - under the leadership of Washington representative Adam Smith. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:04)


Border Smuggler Pursuit (2007-09-25)
The line between British Columbia and Washington State is getting blurred temporarily. It's part of an experiment to allow Canadian and U-S officers to pursue maritime smugglers across the border. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Students Get Alcohol Counseling (2007-09-24)
The start of college has students across the region excited for a new year of classes .and a year of partying. College administrators are bracing for another year with the persistent student problem of alcohol abuse. Now the University of Washington is thinking if it gets personal, maybe it can get them to stop. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports explains


Rural Surgery Crisis (2007-09-24)
It's not every doctor who can remove your appendix, take out your tonsils and do your emergency C-section. But that's what general surgery is all about in most communities. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has more.


Wireless Internet for Appliances (2007-09-24)
Researchers say they've found a way for electric customers to slash their utility bills and prevent power grid failures. It involves connecting home appliances like dryers and water heaters to the Internet, as KPLU's Ann Dornfeld explains.


Seattle Sues Sonics (2007-09-24)
Seattle Sonics owners say they have no comment' on a lawsuit brought against them by the City of Seattle. Yesterday the fight over the team's future got a little hotter. The City is suing the Sonics in an effort to hold them to their lease at KeyArena, which runs through the 2009-2010 season. KPLU's Gary Davis has the story.


Central Area Crime (2007-09-24)
An increase in gang shootings has prompted people in Seattle's Central Area to look for answers to the violence. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


Street Sales (2007-09-23)
To be a good sales person, you have to know your clientele and believe in your product. Robert Hanson does both. He's one of the top street vendors for the Real Change newspaper. KPLU's Liam Moriarty catches up with him at 4th and Columbia in downtown Seattle.


The Rate Cut (2007-09-21)
The federal reserve cut interest rates this week. Stock prices jumped right after the announcement. Are happy days here again? KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Kalama Coal Plant Opposed (2007-09-21)
A proposed power plant in southwest Washington is running into opposition. Environmental and clean energy groups say the plant would undo the gains Washington is making toward reducing greenhouse gas pollution because it would be fueled by coal. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Man Vs Machine (2007-09-21)
In wine circles there's a debate: Man vs. machine. We're talking about how the grapes are picked. Some say you can taste the difference between hand picked grapes and machine harvested fruit. Others say machines are an inevitable reality. KPLU's Anna King reports.


WSDOT Inspects Ship Canal Bridge (2007-09-21)
The state Department of Transportation will inspect the I-5 Ship Canal Bridge tomorrow for needed repairs. It's Puget Sound's largest steel truss bridge. That's the same kind of bridge that collapsed in Minneapolis this summer, killing 13 people. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Thiel on Belichick Spying (2007-09-21)
The fallout continues from the NFL sidelines spying scandal involving New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick. He's been fined the maximum 500-thousand dollars and the team has been fined 250-thousand. Some are wondering how long this practice has been going on and whether the punishment fits the crime. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about it.


Dying Languages in NW (2007-09-20)
Dozens of native languages in the Pacific Northwest are in danger of dying out. That's from a research group that's named the region one of the top five so-called language hotspots in the world. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Pro-Industrial Zoning Proposed (2007-09-20)
Seattle is considering a dramatic cut in the amount of office and retail space allowed on its industrial lands. Recent private investment in areas along the Duwamish River, south of downtown, have spurred concerns that key industrial employers are being pushed out. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Tidal Energy Projects (2007-09-20)
There's a veritable gold rush underway on Northwest waters. Developers, governments, and utilities have staked claims on the most promising wave energy and tidal power sites. This has often been a case of leap first, ask questions later. Now the questions are getting a closer look. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on what it'll take to light your lights with the power of the tides.


Kalama Coal Plant Opposed (2007-09-20)
A proposed power plant in southwest Washington is running into opposition. Environmental and clean energy groups say the plant would undo the gains Washington is making toward reducing greenhouse gas pollution because it would be fueled by coal. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Electric Cars For Around Town (2007-09-20)
They're small. They're kinda cute. And they could be one solution to unsnarling urban traffic and saving the planet, to boot. At a Clean Car conference in Seattle, KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty took a look at some light-duty electric vehicles


Pro-industrial Zoning Proposed (2007-09-20)
Seattle is considering a dramatic cut in the amount of office and retail space allowed on its industrial lands. Recent private investment in areas along the Duwamish River, south of downtown, have spurred concerns that key industrial employers are being pushed out. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:25)


Call for Emissions Ruling (2007-09-19)
A coalition of western environmental groups says it's losing patience with the Federal Government. THey want to force a ruling on whether Washington, Oregon, and other states can enact stricter emissions standards. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Food for Thought: Salmon Dinner (2007-09-19)
On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times Restaurant Critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein how her husband's good deed resulted in a tasty salmon dinner.


Future of Seattle's Industrial Lands (2007-09-19)
You might not know that industrial jobs make up the largest sector of Seattle's economy. But employers in those fields say the rising cost of land is driving them out. The city is considering measures to keep them here. A forum on the issue takes place tomorrow at City Hall. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:57)


Clean Car Expo (2007-09-19)
Arnold Schwarzenegger's green guru is telling a gathering of clean car enthusiasts in Seattle that alternative energy is becoming the mainstream. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty was there.


Medicare Cuts 'Devastating' (2007-09-19)
If you're on Medicare, it will become more difficult to find a doctor in Washington State. That's the warning from the American Medical Association. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


Alaska Airlines Inflight Wi-Fi (2007-09-19)
Soon you'll have one less excuse for mot returning your email right away. The region's dominant air carrier, Alaska Airlines, plans to launch in-flight wireless internet service next year. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Wildfire Cost (2007-09-19)
This year, taxpayers will send an estimated one billion dollars to protect homes from wildfires. A new report says the worst is yet to come. Unless policy makers and home builders decide to change the pattern of development. KPLU's Elizabeth WYnne Johnson reports.


Bus Tunnel Uncertainties (2007-09-19)
Next Monday's planned re-opening of the bus tunnel under downtown Seattle has been greeted with speeches and official fanfare. But KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty found a lot of bus riders hadn't gotten the word yet


Tsunami Drill Deemed Success (2007-09-19)
The National Weather Service says its annual West Coast tsunami warning test went smoothly today. But it says not enough people have weather radios that transmit emergency alerts. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Licensing Nightclubs (2007-09-18)
Bars and nightclubs have a year to clean up their act. That's the message from the Seattle City Council. It has put off forcing the clubs to get special licenses,for a while at least. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel explains.


Prisoner Escapes In AZ (2007-09-18)
Two convicted murderers from Washington escaped yesterday from a private prison in Arizona. One was quickly captured. The other, 37-year old Roy Townsend is still on the lam. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has reaction from the father of Townsend's victim.


Detention Center Tour (2007-09-18)
When illegal immigrants are captured in Washington, Oregon, and Alaska, they're brought to a federal detention center in Tacoma. It's the only facility of its kind in the Northwest. When it opened three years ago, it held 500 detainees. Now it holds, on average, a thousand. KPLU's Austin Jenkins recently got a rare look inside this federal lock-up.


Transit Tunnel To Re-open (2007-09-18)
The tunnel that used to carry buses beneath downtown Seattle is about to re-open after being closed for construction for two years. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty got a look at the upgraded tunnel during a preview Tuesday morning.


State Economist Optimistic (2007-09-18)
Washington's chief economist with Employment Security is in a good mood. Just as she was presenting positive news about the state's unemployment levels, she got word of the Federal Reserve's cut to short-term interest rates. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:03)


A Great Day in Seattle (2007-09-18)
You may be familiar with the famous photo "A Great Day in Harlem." It was taken in 1958 on the steps of a Harlem brownstone, capturing some of the greatest musicians in the history of jazz. Fast forward nearly 50 years to the steps of Seattle City Hall, where a photo of Seattle jazz musicians was taken earlier this year. Prints are about to go on sale. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick sat down with one of the musicians who made it happen - trumpeter Thomas Marriott.


Sustainable Economy Conference (2007-09-17)
How can new technologies be used to help advance alternative energy and other green inventions? A conference exploring their use in building a sustainable economy starts today (Monday 9-17-07) in Seattle. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.(1:31)


Microsoft Response to EU (2007-09-17)
Microsoft hasn't decided yet whether it will go back to court to fight the latest ruling from the European Commission. But the company's top attorney says a lot has changed since the anti-trust complaint was first brought against the software giant nearly a decade ago. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:18)


Funding Schools with Teachers (2007-09-17)
Each year, Washington state hands over education money to school districts. Then districts decide how to divvy it up among the schools. In Seattle, the district gives out money per head -- the more kids you have, the more money you get. But that may be about to change. Education reporter Chana Joffe-Walt explains.


Microsoft Loses EU Appeal (2007-09-17)
Microsoft is deciding whether to appeal this morning's (monday, 9-17-07) decision from a European court in Luxembourg. The court ruled the European Commission was correct in concluding that Microsoft was guilty of monopoly abuse, by leveraging its dominance in desktop computers. More from KPLU business and labor reporter, Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:04)


New Jazz Vocal Releases (2007-09-17)
A lot of jazz vocalists have new releases out. In our music commentary this month, KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talks with Music Director Nick Francis about some of the more notable new releases.


Signing up Soldiers (2007-09-16)
In an anti-war, blue state like Washington, being a military recruiter isn't easy. But Army Staff Sgt. Kevin Shaw says he likes the challenge. KPLU's Paula Wissel went out with him on a prospecting mission near Olympia.


WA Rules Against Business Group (2007-09-14)
The Washington Supreme Court has struck a blow to steath political attack campaigns. The high court ruled thursday the state has the right to compel shadow organizations to register as political committees and reveal their donor list. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Horizon Air Inspections (2007-09-14)
Horizon Air is canceling about 121 flights today, 55 of them out of Seattle, as it wraps-up inspections of its Bombardier turbo-prop planes. The airline hopes to make significant improvements in getting its flights back to normal tomorrow. Meantime, investigators in Denmark are closer to figuring out what caused a Bombardier crash there. More from KPLU's Amanda Loder.


Thiel on Huskies (2007-09-14)
The University of Washington has a big football game Saturday. They're hosting 10th-ranked Ohio State. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about why the Huskies have a good chance for an upset.


Making College Accessible (2007-09-14)
Students, parents and educators around the country may soon celebrate a big victory. Legislation that would expand federal financial aid is awaiting signature by President Bush. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:25)


Researchers Examine MS Hot Spot (2007-09-14)
The Palouse area of Eastern Washington is one of the nation's hot spots in terms of reporterd cases of Multiple Sclerosis. And researchers are trying to figure out why. More from reporter Glenn Mosely.


Lone Star Love Preview (2007-09-14)
Seattle has become a key venue for Broadway-bound shows. There are only three new musicals opening there this year, and of those, two have chosen Seattle theaters for their pre-New-York debuts. Hot on the heels of last month's run of "Young Frankenstein" at the Paramount Theater, the Fifth Avenue is host to a new Bluegrass musical, "Lone Star Love." And, as KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp reports, the show's uniqueness comes from the way it puts musicians center stage. (5:00)


Teen Fights for Mom and Dad (2007-09-13)
It's the ultimate power of the state - to decide whether parents are fit to parent. Each year in Washington state, a couple thousand kids are taken from their parents and put in foster care. Now a new law allows kids to appeal that decision, and get their parents back. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has the story of the first kid to try:


Navy Seeks Air & Water Training (2007-09-13)
The Navy wants more local room to test new aerial and underwater weapons. Their plans are raising questions about potential impacts. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Gunshots Blamed for Wildfire (2007-09-13)
A wildfire can be started by everything from a lightning strike to a carelessly tossed cigarette butt. A recent fire in Oregon is blamed on something different: A gun. KPLU's Chris Lehman explains.


The Road to Wealth (2007-09-13)
Becoming wealthy may seem like an impossible dream, but it's not as hard as you might think. All it takes is some planning and discipline. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein shares his wealth-building advice with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


NW's Role in Defense Contracting (2007-09-13)
Hi-speed boats, unmanned aircraft, special cold weather gloves. These are just some of the products Northwest companies manufacture for the military. This week, Washington Senator Patty Murray announced millions of dollars in defense funding for Washington businesses alone. KPLU's Austin Jenkins introduces us to this little known side of the region's economy.


Financial Aid Expansion (2007-09-13)
A college education should be within reach for any child in the United States. That's according to U.S. Senator Patty Murray, who is urging the President to sign new legislation that would expand federal financial aid programs. More from KPLU Business and Labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:56)


Horizon Air Cancellations (2007-09-13)
Flight schedules in the Northwest continue to be disrupted as planes in the Horizon Air fleet await inspection. The planes, made by Canadian manufacturer Bombardier, are the same model as the two that recently crashed in Europe. Amanda Loder reports from Spokane on what Horizon is doing so far, and what travelers can expect.


Navy Plans Increased Training (2007-09-12)
The Navy wants more local room to test new aerial and underwater weapons. Their plans are raising questions about potential impacts. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Exemption Sought for Flexcar (2007-09-12)
If you use Flexcar we now know the date when your rates may be going up. The state Deparment of Revenue says car-sharing services like Flexcar are the same as rental cars. That means, starting October first, Flexcar users will have to pay a car rental tax; unless a deal can be hammered out. The latest on this story from KPLU's Austin Jenkins.


Food for Thought: School Lunches (2007-09-12)
School lunches are not what they were when Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein were in school; as we learn on today's Food for Thought.


Orca Protection (2007-09-12)
The Puget Sound resident Orca Whales have just gotten an extra measure of protection. KPLU envrionment reporter Liam Moriarty is in the San Juan Islands, and has this report.


Tacoma Remembers 9/11 (2007-09-12)
Firefighters in Tacoma gathered yesterday to remember those who died in the September 11th terrorist attacks. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Baird Favors War Tax (2007-09-12)
Southwest Washington Democrat, Brian Baird, is backing a federal tax increase to help pay for the US War in Iraq. More from reporter Rob Manning.


Differing Views on Whale Kill (2007-09-11)
The five Makah Indian hunters who killed a gray whale over the weekend could face simultaneous charges in federal and tribal court. Opinions differ on and off the coastal reservation about the proper punishment for the illegal whale hunt. A few hail the hunters as heroes. Farther away the outrage is just getting started. KPLU's Tom Banse has this report from Washington's Olympic Peninsula.


Earthworm Protection (2007-09-11)
Who doesn't love a three-foot-long earthworm that spits? Environmental groups are suing the federal government to protect a creepy, crawly worm that calls the Palouse home. KPLU's Anna King explains.


Differing Views on Whale Kill (2007-09-11)
The five Makah Indian hunters who killed a gray whale over the weekend could face simultaneous charges in federal and tribal court. Opinions differ on and off the coastal reservation about the proper punishment for the illegal whale hunt. A few hail the hunters as heroes. Farther away the outrage is just getting started. KPLU's Tom Banse has this report from Washington's Olympic Peninsula.


Tacoma Firefighters Remember 9/11 (2007-09-11)
Firefighters in Tacoma gathered today to remember those who died in the September 11th terrorist attacks. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Sex Offender DNA Database (2007-09-11)
Washington Governor Chris Gregoire wants the state to have a DNA database of every registered sex offender. That's one of her recommendations following the kidnapping and murder of a Tacoma girl earlier this summer. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Differing Views on Whale Kill (2007-09-11)
The five Makah Indian hunters who killed a gray whale over the weekend could face simultaneous charges in federal and tribal court. Opinions differ on and off the coastal reservation about the proper punishment for the illegal whale hunt. A few hail the hunters as heroes. Farther away the outrage is just getting started. KPLU's Tom Banse has this report from Washington's Olympic Peninsula.


State Economy May Slow (2007-09-10)
Be cautious and careful. That's the word from Washington's chief economist. He says the state's economy continues to buck national trends. But the strong growth of the past couple of years can't last. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


If You Could Talk to the Animals (2007-09-10)
Lisa Triggs gets chilled to the bone, smells of fish and has to clean up manure. And she loves it. She's the walrus trainer at Point Defiance zoo in Tacoma. She tells KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp why it's such a dream job.


Wildlife Officials Track Wolf (2007-09-10)
It's official. Wolves are back in Washington State. A dead calf is proof that at least one of the animals has returned. And wildlife officials are trying to find the wolf for more research. KPLU's Anna King reports.


State Economy May Slow (2007-09-10)
Be cautious and careful. That's the word from Washington's chief economist. He says the state's economy continues to buck national trends. But the strong growth of the past couple of years can't last. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Medical Marijuana Law Hearing (2007-09-10)
Don't put arbitrary limits on an effective medicine. That sentiment was a main theme at public hearing in Seattle yesterday (Monday) on the state's medical marijuana law. More from KPLU health & science reporter Gary Davis.


Sewage Treatment in Victoria (2007-09-10)
For decades, Victoria, British Columbia has been dumping its raw sewage into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. This has been unpopular with environmentalists - not to mention neighboring cities on both sides of the border. Now, the city has agreed to build a modern sewage treatment system. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty takes a look at how that's going


Harvey Goldner Remembered (2007-09-10)
Earlier this year, Seattle lost a man who became known as the Bard of Belltown. Harvey Goldner was a regular at poetry readings across the city, where he became a mentor to many. After years of chain-smoking, Goldner died this summer at age 65. A memorial for him brought Seattle's poetry community together. KPLU'S Daysha Eaton has more. (5:00)


Makah Kill Gray Whale (2007-09-10)
The Makah Indian Tribe says it will prosecute five members who killed a gray whale in an unauthorized hunt over the weekend. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Dam Repair Plan (2007-09-07)
We have a lot of old dams. Roughly 25-hundred hold back watershere in the Northwest. Even the sturdiest structures made from concreteand wood don't hold up forever. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnsonreports on the status of dam safety and why some groups are raising ared flag.


Big Labor and Enviros Seek to Block Eyman Initiative from Ballot (2007-09-07)
Environmentalists and a major labor union want to keep an anti-tax initiative off Washington's November ballot. They made their case yesterday before the State Supreme Court. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Cowboys and Saddles (2007-09-07)
You can tell a lot about a cowboy by the type of saddle on his horse's back. Some are dolled up with silver for the show ring, others are rugged for work in the backcountry. And there is one place in the Northwest where cowboys turn for the best. KPLU's Anna King has this profile of a saddle maker in Pendleton, Oregon; home of the Pendleton Roundup.


New Salmon Plan (2007-09-07)
Federal dam operators released a court-mandated salmon proposal yesterday. They say it will recover fish while keeping the hydropower system running. KPLU's Rob Manning has more.


Salmon Homecoming Celebration (2007-09-07)
Every autumn for thousands of years, salmon have returned to Northwest rivers and steams to complete their life cycle. And for thousands of years, the region's native people have greeted them as food for both body and spirit. This weekend, the Salmon Homecoming celebration returns to the downtown Seattle waterfront. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Thiel on Seahawks Season (2007-09-07)
The Seahawks open their 2007 season at home Sunday against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The team has made a lot of changes since the end of last season. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about how he thinks the Hawks will do this year.


Ruling Clears I-960 for Ballot (2007-09-07)
An anti-tax initiative will appear on Washington's November ballot. This following a quick ruling by the State Supreme Court. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Private Buses for Microsoft Employees (2007-09-06)
Microsoft says it is doing its part to ease traffic congestion in the greater Seattle area. It has announced new private express buses for its employees. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:50)


Boeing Delays Affect Workforce (2007-09-06)
The push to get Boeing's new 787 jet done on time is putting increasing pressure on all of its workforce. The company now says the new plane won't be ready for first flight till late fall. And union leaders say line workers have been forced into overtime. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:43)


Microsoft Expanding Seattle Presence (2007-09-06)
Microsoft is expanding its presence in Seattle. The Redmond-based company has announced it will open three new work locations in the city and increase the number of employees it has based in Seattle to a total of 14-hundred workers. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:04)


Hanford Plutonium Bound for South Carolina (2007-09-06)
Currently, it's protected by guards and dogs. We're talking about plutonium at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. Now it's going to be shipped-out to South Carolina. KPLU's Anna King reports.


School Safety Through Mapping (2007-09-06)
It's something we usually only talk about after a tragedy - preparing schools for shootings and natural disasters. Now Washington state is being recognized for planning ahead. It's won a national award for a public-safety program that maps Washington schools. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


Barron's 400 Stock Index (2007-09-06)
We've all heard of the Dow Jones Industrial Average. It's a very popular stock index. But there are many more such as the S&P 500, Nasdaq Composite and Russell 2000. The new Barron's 400 index was launched this week. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein looks at it with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Online High School Enrollment Surges (2007-09-06)
Hundreds of high school students across the Northwest returned to class this week without leaving the comfort of home. Full-time enrollments at online high schools are surging. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Food for Thought: Tomatoes (2007-09-05)
Nancy Leson and 600 pounds of fresh Roma tomatoes! The Seattle Times restaurant critic tells the whole saucy story to KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Cleveland's New Look (2007-09-05)
Hundreds of students are going back to school today to new digs. Tacoma's historic Lincoln High School has undergone a 75 million dollar remodel. In Seattle, Cleveland High is hoping a two year renovation project will breathe new life into its classrooms. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes us there.


Former US Rep. Jennifer Dunn Dies (2007-09-05)
One of the state's most influential political figures has died. Republican Jennifer Dunn suffered a pulmonary embolism Wednesday at her Virginia home. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Poplar Trees Could be the Next Corn When it Comes to Ethanol Production (2007-09-05)
Poplar trees have become a cheap source of pulp for paper production in Washington and Oregon. Now, with the help of a federal grant, a Washington State University scientist will study turning the hefty crop into ethanol. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Electronics Banned in NW Schools (2007-09-05)
It's back to class for kids around the Northwest. But many students will be leaving their cell phones and iPods in their lockers this year. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Ft Lewis Stryker Brigade Returns Home (2007-09-05)
Nearly 4,000 Northwest-based soldiers are coming home after an extended stay in Iraq. The first group arrived at Fort Lewis yesterday. KPLU's Austin Jenkins was there.


Enviros Won't Miss Larry Craig (2007-09-04)
During a Congressional career spanning 27 years, Idaho Senator Larry Craig has made lots of friends and enemies. Now, the scandal-ridden lawmaker is expected to announce his resignation tomorrow. KPLU environment reporter LIam Moriarty finds that Northwest conservationists say they won't miss him.


Social Service Contracts Axed (2007-09-04)
A one-year-old outreach program that aimed to help drug abusers clean up their act has lost its funding from the city of Seattle. It's parent agency was shut down last month by King County. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Social Service Contracts Axed (2007-09-04)
A one-year-old outreach program that aimed to help drug abusers clean up their act has lost its funding from the city of Seattle. Its parent agency was shut down last month by King County. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


High Schools Get Facelift (2007-09-04)
Hundreds of students will go back to school to new digs. Tacoma's historic Lincoln High has undergone a 75 million dollar remodel. In Seattle, Cleveland High is hoping a two year renovation project will breathe new life into its classrooms. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes us there:


Teachers Prep Their Classrooms (2007-09-04)
Puget Sound area teachers are busy preparing their classrooms for the new school year. This year in Seattle, a new superintendent and some new standards mean setting up your classroom has a different feel. KPLU's Chana Joffe Walt explains.


Teachers Prep Their Classrooms (2007-09-04)
Puget Sound teachers are busy preparing their classrooms for the new school year. This year in Seattle, a new Superintendent and some new standards mean setting up your classroom has a different feel. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt explains:


Dirt: An Interview with David Montgomery (2007-09-04)
There are few things so taken for granted as the soil beneath our feet. But historically, civilizations have paid a high price for treating their soil like dirt. University of Washington professor David Montgomery has written Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations, about the role soil erosion plays in how societies flourish - and fail. Montgomery tells KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty that, for all our 21st century technology, we still rely on dirt.


How You Look Does Matter (2007-09-03)
Making sure people look good is Willie Hodge's job. He's the owner of a barbershop in Seattle's Rainier Valley. KPLU's Keith Seinfeld talks with him about the secret to his success.


Three Fort Lewis Soldiers Killed in Afghanistan (2007-08-31)
Three soldiers from Fort Lewis were killed in Afghanistan Tuesday. The dead includes a 24-year-old man from Vancouver, Washington. KPLU's Chris Lehman has more.


Bethel Teachers' Strike Continues (2007-08-31)
Bethel School District and its teachers are waiting for a mediator to call them back to the bargaining table. The teachers went on strike this week. The district says it will notify parents Sunday whether school will begin on Tuesday. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Thiel on Mariners' Slide (2007-08-31)
Are the Mariners out of the playoff hunt? After being swept by the Angels this week at home, they're now on a grueling 10-game road trip. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about why things appear to be unraveling for the team.


WASL Score Release (2007-08-31)
The grades are in, the Office of Public Instruction has released scores for the Washington Assessment of Student Learning. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes a look.


Teachers Score the WASL (2007-08-31)
The release of the WASL scores is a big moment for school districts, parents, and students who want to see how they fared. The scores can also mean a lot to teachers, who often see it as an evaluation of their work. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt brings us the story of one 6th grade math teacher who decided to see the other side of the WASL.


Enviros Won't Miss Larry Craig (2007-08-31)
During a Congressional career spanning 27 years, Idaho Senator Larry Craig has made lots of friends and enemies. Now, the scandal-ridden lawmaker is expected to announce his resignation Saturday. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty finds that Northwest conservationists say they won't miss him.


Bethel Teachers' Strike Continues (2007-08-31)
Bethel Schol District and its teachers are waiting for a mediator to call them back to the bargaining table. The teachers went on strike this week. The district says it will notify parents Sunday whether school will begin on Tuesday. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Volcano Park Idea Debated (2007-08-30)
If you can see Mount St. Helens from where you sit today, you'll no doubt agree it looks placid. A thin vapor plume trickles over the crater rim. If it's action you're after, look in the towns around the foot of the volcano. People are lining up to support or oppose making the volcano a full-fledged national park. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from Longview, Washington.


State and Tribes Work on Culvert Solutions (2007-08-30)
A federal judge has agreed to give state and tribal officials time to work out a plan for fixing culverts that block migrating salmon. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Lake Chelan Levels to Change for Fish and Fun Lovers (2007-08-30)
People who vacation at Lake Chelan might notice some changes in the water level this year. That's because the utility district will drain the tub so to speak to help spawning fish. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Top Ten Washington Stocks (2007-08-30)
Deciding where to put your money in a turbulent stock market can be difficult. The list of the ten largest companies in Washington might be a good place to start. KPLU's Dave Meyer goes over the list with financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Teacher Signs Up to Score the WASL (2007-08-30)
The release of the WASL scores is a big moment for school districts, parents and students who want to see how they fared. The scores can also mean a lot to teachers, who often see it as an evaluation of their work. Chana Joffe-Walt brings us the story one 6th grade math teacher who decided to see the other side of the WASL.


WASL Scores Mixed (2007-08-30)
The grades are in - the Office of the Superintendent Public Instruction has released scores for the Washington Assessment of Student Learning [THURS]. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes a look:


Old Travel Guide Resurrected (2007-08-29)
A once popular travel guidebook series with roots in the Great Depression is being resurrected for 21st century travelers. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Baird Firm in Face of Anti-War Critics (2007-08-29)
Southwest Washington Congressman Brian Baird is steeling himself for more criticism from anti-war constituents. For the first time in Baird's career, half a dozen police officers stood guard at one of his town hall meetings. That was in Vancouver, Washington last Monday. The Democratic Rep was in for it again in Longview last night. And that's where we found KPLU's Tom Banse.


Diesel Spill in BC Still Presents Problems (2007-08-29)
A diesel spill inside an ecological reserve in British Columbia has dissipated. But the heavy logging equipment that caused a nine mile-long slick off northeastern Vancouver Island last week still lies under a thousand feet of water. Environmentalists say the government is moving too slowly in deciding what to do next. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Food for Thought: Fishing (2007-08-29)
On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times Restaurant critic Nancy Leson takes KPLU's Dick Stein for a trip down to the old urban fishin' hole...


Naturalization Frustration (2007-08-28)
Across the Northwest, hundreds of would-be American citizens wait in limbo because the FBI won't clear them to take the oath of citizenship. Iraqis in the Northwest voice particular irritation with slow background checks. Many of them fled here without passports and want to get family members out of Iraq. KPLU's Tom Banse has a profile of naturalization frustration.


Insurance Effort in Sun Valley Fire (2007-08-28)
The Castle Rock Fire in central Idaho is officially the nation's number one fire priority. It's not lives that are threatened, so much as about a billion dollars' worth of high-end real estate. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has this look at what one insurance company is doing to avoid getting burned.


Statin Drugs and Alzheimers (2007-08-28)
Drugs used to treat cardiovascular problems may also work to prevent Alzheimer's disease. That's the finding of some Seattle-based researchers. More from KPLU Health & Science reporter Gary Davis.


Bush Visit Brings Out Party Faithful, Protesters (2007-08-28)
President Bush visited Washington yesterday to attend a fundraiser for the state Republican Party and GOP Congressman Dave Reichert. He got a warm welcome from the party faithful in the ballroom of the Hyatt Regency in Bellevue. The reception on the streets outside was a bit hotter. KPLU's Liam Moriarty was there


Transforming Parks (2007-08-28)
Even with voters passing levies for parks, volunteers are still a vital part of building and maintaining the spaces. Often, it's the only way improvements are made. So when five-hundred people showed up to at a south Seattle park to volunteer, it was like pennies from heaven. More from KPLU's Paula Wissel.


Wildfire Battle in Idaho (2007-08-28)
Wildfires are closing in on the central Idaho resort town of Ketchum. Hundreds of people have been evacuated. Some 1,400 firefighters are on it. They're even using snow-making machines to beatback the flames. The fight against the Castle Rock Fire is drawing resources from throughout the state and beyond. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson went to Ketchum and has this report.


Idaho Senator Arrested for Lewd Conduct in Restroom (2007-08-28)
A new sex scandal is breaking in the nation's capitol. It involves Idaho Senator Larry Craig. He pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct earlier this month after being arrested at the Minneapolis airport. In a statement yesterday, the third-term Republican said police misconstrued his actions in an airport restroom. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Ferry Terror Training (2007-08-27)
It's up to you to prevent terrorism on the ferries. In part, anyway. That's the message from state emergency officials. They say their new campaign to get citizens to help out is having an effect. More from KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel.


Washington's Battle to Regulate Brushpickers (2007-08-27)
When you buy a bouquet of flowers, do you ever wonder where the decorative greens come from? If it's fern or salal, it likely came from the forests of the Pacific Northwest. The workers who pick the greens are mostly immigrants. Local warehouses purchase them and ship the product across the country and even internationally. It's a largely unregulated industry. But the State of Washington is trying to change that, and is now locked in a contentious legal battle. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Immigration Reform (2007-08-27)
Community leaders say the failure of federal immigration reform is creating a hostile environment for foreign workers in this state, both legal and illegal. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Gonzales Resignation (2007-08-27)
The resignation of Attorney General Alberto Gonzales has reverberated around the country. In Seattle, KPLU's Paula Wissel took to the streets to get a sample of opinion here.


Thiel on Vick Plea (2007-08-24)
Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick has agreed to plead guilty to federal dogfighting charges. His co-defendants claim that Vick financed the dogfighting gambling ring and participated in the execution of several of the animals. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about what may be in store for Vick after an expected prison term.


AIDS Vaccine Conference in Seattle (2007-08-23)
More than 900 HIV researchers from across the globe are in Seattle this week to discuss the latest advances, and setbacks, in developing an HIV/AIDS vaccine. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Election Official Says August Primary Didn't Scare Off Voters (2007-08-23)
We won't know for several days what the turnout was in the state's new August primary. It was corecast at 34-percent statewide. But a top election official says the early primary date does not appear to have hurt turnout. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Racial Profiling Case Settled (2007-08-23)
The U.S. Justice Department has apologized and settled a lawsuit with an Iraqi refugee who lives in Kent. Abdulameer Yousef Habeeb was wrongly detained four years ago when he stepped off an Amtrak train in Montana to stretch his legs. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Hyman Minsky's Bubble Theory (2007-08-23)
The credit crunch on Wall Street was forecast by a little-known economist who died about ten years ago. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein says today's market turmoil is a good match for Hyman Minsky's description of bubbles . He spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Enviros Say BC Spill Points to Need for Prevention (2007-08-23)
A diesel spill near a whale reserve in British Columbia has environmentalists on both sides of the border calling for better spill prevention. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Climate Goal Set (2007-08-23)
Leaders of six western states and two Canadian provinces announced an agreement yesterday to cut greenhouse gas emissions over the next 13 years. KPLU's Rob Manning reports.


School Funding Lawsuit (2007-08-23)
Does Washington state spend enough cash educate its one million public school students? A community coalition is saying no. And it's taking the state to court to pay up. Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Global Animal Health at WSU (2007-08-22)
Washington State University President Elson Floyd is proposing a new School for Global Animal Health at the university's Pullman campus. KPLU's Glenn Mosley reports.


Ecological Reserve Threatened by Fuel Spill (2007-08-22)
A diesel fuel spill near an ecological reserve in British Columbia has mostly dissipated. But the orca whales and other wildlife near the protected zone aren't necessarily out of danger yet. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


School Board Primary (2007-08-22)
The crowded race for two Seattle school board seats has been slimmed down. Four candidates will move forward to the November elections. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt takes a look.


Food for Thought: Noisy Kitchens (2007-08-22)
Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson wishes that some of her kitchen appliances would just shut up; as she tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Veterans Hospital Opens in Wenatchee, Others Slated (2007-08-22)
Veterans in Northcentral Washington finally have a place to get medical attention near their homes. A new veterans medical clinic opens this week in Wenatchee. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Alcoholic Energy Drinks Draw Fire (2007-08-22)
The attorneys general of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are tossing cold water on a new category of intoxicating drink. The states' legal eagles claim alcoholic energy drinks pose a health and safety risk. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


The Battle Over Children's Health Insurance (2007-08-22)
Both Washington and Oregon want to insure all children by 2010. But the Bush Administration may have just thrown a wrench in those plans. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Diesel Spill Threatens Orcas in BC (2007-08-22)
A barge accident has caused a diesel spill in an ecological reserve off the northeast coast of Vancouver Island. Researchers worry the spill could sicken the region's threatened orca whales. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Dam Removal on Elwha Creeps Closer (2007-08-21)
East of Portland, the electric utility PGE is almost through tearing down Marmot Dam on the Sandy River. The 47-foot tall dam is the largest ever removed in Oregon. The demolition project is ahead of schedule. The same cannot be said for an oft-delayed project on Washington's Elwha River. The targeted dams there would be the biggest ever removed in the whole United States. KPLU's Tom Banse reports there's the prospect of action on the ground after more than twenty years of debate.


Another Proposal to Bring Nuclear Waste to Northwest (2007-08-21)
The US Department of Energy is once again looking for a place to bury radioactive waste. And Washington and Idaho are on the list. But it's officials in Oregon who are raising a red flag. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Shoreline Teachers Picket (2007-08-21)
Don't take your money problems out on me. That's the message from the Shoreline teachers union. They picketed proposed budget cuts last night. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Dam Removal on Elwha Creeps Closer (2007-08-21)
East of Portland, the electric utility PGE is almost through tearing down Marmot Dam on the Sandy River. The 47-foot tall dam is the largest ever removed in Oregon. The demolition project is ahead of schedule. The same cannot be said for an oft-delayed project on Washington's Elwha River. The targeted dams there would be the biggest ever removed in the whole United States. KPLU's Tom Banse reports there's the prospect of action on the ground after more than twenty years of debate.


Dam Removal on Elwha Creeps Closer (2007-08-21)
East of Portland, the electric utility PGE is almost through tearing down Marmot Dam on the Sandy River. The 47-foot tall dam is the largest ever removed in Oregon. The demolition project is ahead of schedule. The same cannot be said for an oft-delayed project on Washington's Elwha River. The targeted dams there would be the biggest ever removed in the whole United States. KPLU's Tom Banse reports there's the prospect of action on the ground after more than twenty years of debate.


Shoreline Teachers Picket (2007-08-21)
Don't take your money problems out on me. That's the message from the Shoreline teachers union. They picketed proposed budget cuts last night. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Dam Removal on Elwha Creeps Closer (2007-08-21)
East of Portland, the electric utility PGE is almost through tearing down Marmot Dam on the Sandy River. The 47-foot tall dam is the largest ever removed in Oregon. The demolition project is ahead of schedule. The same cannot be said for an oft-delayed project on Washington's Elwha River. The targeted dams there would be the biggest ever removed in the whole United States. KPLU's Tom Banse reports there's the prospect of action on the ground after more than twenty years of debate.


Shoreline Teachers Picket (2007-08-21)
Don't take your money problems out on me. That's the message from the Shoreline teachers union. They picketed proposed budget cuts last night. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Dam Removal on Elwha Creeps Closer (2007-08-21)
East of Portland, the electric utility PGE is almost through tearing down Marmot Dam on the Sandy River. The 47-foot tall dam is the largest ever removed in Oregon. The demolition project is ahead of schedule. The same cannot be said for an oft-delayed project on Washington's Elwha River. The targeted dams there would be the biggest ever removed in the whole United States. KPLU's Tom Banse reports there's the prospect of action on the ground after more than twenty years of debate.


More Logging Could Be On the Way for Northwest (2007-08-20)
It's not exactly a return to the heyday of years gone by, but the northwest logging industry has reason to celebrate. Two federal agencies are gearing up to allow more logging in Washington, Oregon and northern California. As KPLU's Chris Lehman reports, you could see a lot more logging trucks rolling down the highway in the next few years.


Columbia River Salmon Tag Found in New Zealand Bird (2007-08-20)
It's a long way to fly for lunch. A tag that was placed in a Columbia River salmon recently showed up in the belly of a seabird in New Zealand. KPLU's Chris Lehman explains.


Teachers Picket (2007-08-20)
Don't take your money problems out on me. That's the message from the Shoreline teachers union. They are picketing proposed budget cuts. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports:


Despite Fires, Still Holding Out (2007-08-20)
At something over 40-thousand acres, the two fires known as the Landmark Complex aren't even close to being the biggest of Idaho's 14 active wildfires. But they're generating more than one kind of heat. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has this update on a cluster of residents who are refusing to heed evacuation orders.


Vets Say Mental Illness Goes Untreated (2007-08-20)
Iraq war veterans say they've struggled to get mental health treatment from the military and Veterans Administration. The vets testified before US Senator Patty Murray at a field hearing in Tacoma. More from KPLU's Ann Dornfeld.


Electing School Board Members (2007-08-20)
With many school board races on the ballot, what qualities does it take to be an effective board member? KPLU's Gary Davis spoke with Seattle University education professor Michael Silver.


Of Milfoil and Money (2007-08-20)
Eurasian milfoil is a fluffy, feathery water weed. It's invasive, non-native and an all-around nuisance in the Northwest. KPLU's Elizabeth WYnne Johnson looks at how the neighboring states of Idaho and Washington approach their common foe. Quite differently, it turns out.


Grocery Workers and Employers Reach Agreement (2007-08-20)
Unionized grocery workers and their employers at four major food chains in the region have reached a tentative agreement. They've just finished three days of contract talks. The outcome will affect about 20,000 checkers, clerks and meat-cutters. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:51)


Blue Whales Sighted Off British Columbia (2007-08-20)
Blue whales are the largest creatures ever to roam the earth. Once plentiful in oceans across the globe, they were hunted nearly to extincition during the last century. Now, researchers say a recent sighting of blue whales off the coast of British Columbia could be a sign they're making a comeback. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Annexation Votes for Two King County Cities (2007-08-20)
Should they join the big city? Voters in un-incorporated areas near Auburn and Federal Way are deciding whether they should officially become part of urban areas they border on. Proponents say this would lead to better response times for police and fire and would provide city planning. But some people who live in the areas are concerned the change would increase development without providing improved services. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:24)


Harnessing the Motion of the Ocean (2007-08-17)
This month, a new technology to generate electricity from ocean waves hits the water. Test buoys will be deployed a few miles off the coast at Makah Bay here in Washington and in Newport and Bandon, Oregon. The Northwest is poised to lead the way on wave energy. But for those who earn a living on the water, it's not clear whether the ocean's big enough for everyone. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has our story.


Vets Say Mental Illness Untreated (2007-08-17)
Iraq war veterans say they've struggled to get mental health treatment from the military and Veterans Administration. The vets testified before U-S Senator Patty Murray at a Field Hearing in Tacoma. More from KPLU's Ann Dornfeld. [0:57]


Blue Whales Sighted Off British Columbia (2007-08-17)
Blue whales are the largest creatures ever to roam the Earth. Once plentiful in oceans across the globe, they were hunted nearly to extinction during the last century. Now, researchers say a recent sighting of blue whales off the coast of British Columbia could be a sign they're making a comeback. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Thiel on Sonics Damage Control (2007-08-17)
Sonics owner Clay Bennett was put on the defensive this week by a member of his ownership team who made a controversial comment. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about the fallout from that remark.


WA Attorney General Investigates High Gas Prices (2007-08-17)
Gas prices go up. Gas prices go down. They used to be higher East of the Cascades. Now they're higher in the West. What gives? Yesterday Washington State Attorney General Rob McKenna released the findings from phase 1 of an investigation into what's driving gas prices. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Judge Rules Hatchery Salmon and Wild Salmon are Different (2007-08-16)
A ruling this week by a Federal judge in Oregon is being hailed as a victory for wild salmon. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Coast Guard Opens New Seattle HQ (2007-08-16)
The US Coast Guard has opened a new port security command center in Seattle. The Coast Guard will work alongside other branches of the military and law enforcement to ward off terrorist attacks. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Drug Investigators Seize Pot Plants Around the Northwest (2007-08-16)
Throughout Washington State people in the pot business are getting busted. Some of the biggest marijuana raids ever reported in Washington State have taken place over the last week in Yakima, Klickitat, Benton and Skamania counties. KPLU's Anna King reports


King County Voters Look at Parks Levies (2007-08-16)
In the primary election next Tuesday, King County voters are being asked to decide the fate of two property tax levies. The money would go toward parks, open space, trails - even Seattle's Woodland Park Zoo. KPLU's Liam Moriarty sorts it all out.


Waste Treatment Plant to Restart Construction Within a Month (2007-08-16)
The U.S. Department of Energy has cleared construction to restart on Hanford's hugely expensive radioactive waste treatment plant near Richland. Construction had been delayed for more than a year because officials were worried the plant might not withstand an earthquake. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Nation's Biggest Biodiesel Refinery Opens (2007-08-16)
More than 250 luminaries and guests celebrated the opening of the nation's biggest biodiesel refinery in Hoquiam yesterday. Speeches touted the benefits of keeping our petro-dollars at home. But the new plant still relies on imported oil -- vegetable oil in this case. KPLU's Tom Banse reports that energy independence remains a hard nut to crack in the Northwest.


Hedge Funds and Market Volatility (2007-08-16)
Problems in the lending industry are being blamed for the volatility on Wall Street. But that's not the only factor. Hedge funds play a big role. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein explains it to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Judge Rules Hatchery Salmon and Wild Salmon are Different (2007-08-16)
A ruling this week by a Federal judge in Oregon is being hailed as a victory for wild salmon. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Judge Rules Hatchery Salmon and Wild Salmon are Different (2007-08-16)
A ruling this week by a Federal judge in Oregon is being hailed as a victory for wild salmon. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Lake Roosevelt Awash in Human Waste (2007-08-15)
There's an experience almost universally shared by anyone who'sever ventured into the great outdoors. Nature calls. And you're nowhere near any sort of modern flush facility. Or even an outhouse. Apparently, that's happening to an alarming number of visitors at Lake Roosevelt in northeast Washington. One of the most beautiful sections of the Columbia River is a wash in human waste. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has the story.


Food For Thought: Best Burgers (2007-08-15)
On this week's Food For Thought, we tackle the meaty topic of burgers. Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein cast their votes for the best burgers in the region.


BPA Pressures Utilities to Reach Rate Compromise (2007-08-15)
Electricity wholesaler Bonneville Power is putting pressure on the region's public and private utilities. BPA wants the power companies to reach a new plan for divvying up the Northwest's cheap federal hydropower. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Fire on Hanford Reach Scars Efforts to Replant Native Shrubs (2007-08-15)
Firefighters have corralled a wildfire that scorched 5,000-acres of the Hanford Reach National Monument near Richland, Washington. The blaze didn't threaten any buildings on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, but it does set back a laborious habitat restoration project. KPLU's Anna King reports.


Food for Thought: Burgers (2007-08-15)
On today's Food for Thought, we tackle the meaty topic of burgers. Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein cast their votes for the best burgers in town.


Electing a Prosecutor (2007-08-14)
How do you replace a much beloved public servant? Someone whose name was practically synonymous with the elected office he held. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel explores that as she looks at the democratic primary race for King County Prosecutor.


Salmon River Closure (2007-08-13)
Wildfires have forced the Forest Service to close a popular stretch of the Salmon River in Idaho. That's making it tough on business. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports, the closure's ripple effect is just getting started


AntiTerrorism Money (2007-08-13)
The war on terrorism is putting a strain on local law enforcement. That's what police in Washington are saying. They say even with extra federal money they're having to doing more with less. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel explains.


Port Commission Primary Races (2007-08-13)
Washington voters are casting their ballots in the earliest primary ever held in the state. Election-day is Tuesday, August twenty first. In Seattle, some of the more contentious races are for port commission seats. In recent weeks the port has made front-page news with disputes over ethics, affordable housing and competition for lucrative cargo business. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp spoke with University of Washington political science professor David Olsen.


Homeland Insecurity (2007-08-13)
Homeland security dollars have been used to purchase everything from bomb-tracking robots to bullet proof vehicles. Still, police and fire officials in the state say more money is needed to effectively fight terrorism. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


Medical Marijuana Rules (2007-08-13)
It's been almost a decade since Washington voters legalized the medical use of marijuana. But there's always been confusion about the law's application. Earlier this year, the legislature asked state health officials to clarify some the measure's vague guidelines. Now the public is invited to give input. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Logging on Federal Forest Lands Trending Higher (2007-08-10)
The amount of logging on federal lands in the Northwest is trending upward. By next year, ther Forest Service aims to offer the highest level of cut in ten years. The Bureau of Land Management is even more ambitious. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Northwest Hops Crops are Tops (2007-08-10)
More and more beer drinkers say that hops are tops. Hops are a key ingredient that give beer its bitterness. And virtually all the United States crop comes from here in the northwest. Beer makers and hops experts are gathering today in Oregon to discuss the flowering vine. KPLU's Chris Lehman has more.


Thiel on Barry Bonds' Homerun Record (2007-08-10)
In our weekly conversation with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel, Art shares his thoughts about Barry Bonds breaking Hank Aaron's home run record. He talked with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick.


I-5 Seattle Closures (2007-08-10)
All bets are off during the lane closures on I-5 in Seattle over the next 19 days. No one really knows how bad the traffic is likely to get. Jamie Holter - with the state Department of Transportation - says the D.O.T figured drivers would make smarter choices if they had better information


NW Fruit Harvest Begins, Farmers Worried About Labor (2007-08-10)
Northwest farmers are just beginning to pick their apples and pears. But some farmers are worried that there might not be enough labor to gather the precious fruit. KPLU's Anna King has more.


Burien Apartments Spared Bulldozer (2007-08-10)
The battle over a low income apartment complex in Burien continues. A judge has granted King County a restraining order on the Port of Seattle's planned demoliton of The Lora Lake Apartments. KPLU's Daysha Eaton has more.


D-Day for I-5 Closures (2007-08-10)
The countdown is over The long-anticipated road closures on Interstate 5 in Seattle begin tonight. KPLU's Liam Moriarty has a last-minute overview of what promises to be a challenging 19 days on the freeways


BC To Breed Spotted Owls (2007-08-09)
Two Northern spotted owls have been captured in British Columbia as part of a government plan to breed the endangered birds in captivity. That's never been done before, as KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Overdose Deaths Spur Drug Sweep (2007-08-09)
A surge in deaths by prescription drug overdose has spurred a major investigation and bust in Southwest Washington. On Tuesday, state and federal agents raided houses across Cowlitz County and arrested 19 people. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on the new face of drug prosecution.


Boost Your Financial Vocabulary (2007-08-09)
Wall Street has its own special vocabulary that can be confusing to outsiders. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein has compiled a list of interesting words and phrases. He starts off by explaining a dead cat bounce to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Seattle Kennel Closure (2007-08-09)
If you're thinking of adopting a dog, right now might be a good time. The Seattle Animal Shelter is about to close its main dog kennels for the next six weeks. KPLU's Daysha Eaton has more.


NW Wheat Farmers Glean Best Price in Decades (2007-08-09)
Around the Northwest wheat farmers are hauling in the harvest and finding the best prices for their "golden grain" in decades. Prices are up because wheat is in short supply due to drought in some areas of the world. Also, some farmers have switched from wheat to soybeans and corn to make biofuel. KPLU's Anna King has more from the wheat fields of Central Washington.


South Lake Union Update (2007-08-08)
One of the state's largest employers is moving its corporate headquarters to Seattle's South Lake Union neighborhood. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:54)


Belevue Plans New Waterfront Park (2007-08-08)
The city of Bellevue is planning a new waterfront park that will connect the city's downtown to Lake Washington. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Kittitas Valley Wind Farm Gets a Boost (2007-08-08)
A controversial wind power project in central Washington is being sent back to the governor for another attempt to get her approval. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Food for Thought: What to Bring to a Potluck (2007-08-08)
Enough with the Jello Salad! On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times Restaurant critic Nancy Leson offers some fast, easy, and classy recipe suggestions for those times when you're asked to brink a dish to a potluck. She shares them with KPLU's Dick Stein.


Climate Change on the Agenda in the Northwest (2007-08-08)
Global warming was on the agenda in two northwest states. Leaders in both Washington and Oregon discussed ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. KPLU's Chris Lehman has more.


Trial Balloon: Promote Mount St. Helens to National Park? (2007-08-08)
A US Senator wants to know if Mount St. Helens would be better off as a national park than under the care of the U-S Forest Service. The inquiry is drawing regional support. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Wind Project Headed Back to Governor (2007-08-08)
Washington voters gave a thumbs-up last November to a ballot measure that requires utilities to produce more renewable energy. But the first big wind farm proposed since the passage of Initiative 937 is running into trouble. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


State Auditors Hunt Employers Who Cheat on Their Taxes (2007-08-07)
They're not exactly slapping handcuffs on business owners. But a new crack team of Washington State auditors IS busting employers who cheat on their taxes. Specifically unemployment taxes. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Amtrack Resumes LImited Service on Cascades Route (2007-08-07)
The trains are running again in the Pacific Northwest. Amtrak has resumed limited service on its Cascades route between Eugene, Oregon and Seattle. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


NAACP Demands Prosecution of Cops (2007-08-07)
The Seattle King County NAACP is calling for the prosecution of two police officers for allegedly assualting a young black man. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Lawsuit Filed Alleging Sex Abuse at WA Women's Prison (2007-08-07)
Two female prison inmates in Washington have filed a class action lawsuit. They allege male prison guards sexually assaulted them and that the prison system is not doing enough to protect women prisoners. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Dead and Dying: Sounding the Alarm Over the Health of NW Forests (2007-08-07)
You don't have to be a forester to see that giant swaths of Northwest forests are dead or dying. The infected areas stand out like a sore thumb: rust-red dead trees where once healthy evergreens stood. Especially East of the Cascades, bugs and disease are feasting on forests made vulnerable by drought and overcrowding. Now the question is: how to stop the spread of this epidemic. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Traumatic Brain Injury: A Northwest Soldier's Struggle to Recover (2007-08-06)
Roadside bombs kill and maim U-S soldiers on a regular basis in Iraq. The powerful blasts don't just destroy the body. The concussive force can also damage the brain. That's why many soldiers are being diagnosed with TBI or Traumatic Brain Injury.


State Auditors Hunt Employers Who Cheat on Their Taxes (2007-08-06)
They're not exactly slapping handcuffs on business owners. But a new crack team of Washington State auditors IS busting employers who cheat on their taxes. Specifically unemployment taxes.


Young Frankenstein Musical Premieres in Seattle (2007-08-06)
The world premiere of the new Mel Brooks musical Young Frankenstein is Tuesday at the Paramount Theater in Seattle. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick spoke with Mel Brooks and several cast members as they took a break from final rehearsals for the show.


Beetle-Killed Forests in BC Contributing to Global Warming? (2007-08-06)
Huge areas of pine forest in British Columbia are turning reddish-brown, killed by a seemingly unstoppable infestation of insects. Researchers are looking into whether all that decaying wood will add to global warming. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Principal Summer School (2007-08-06)
Seattle's school principals will start summer school - of sorts - today. In the past, building leaders would get together for two days to talk about the upcoming year. But the district's new superintendent extended this year's program to ten days. In the drive to meet academic standards, there's added pressure for principals in Seattle and across the state to succeed, as KPLU education reporter Gary Davis explains.


Paving Begins on SeaTac's Third Runway (2007-08-06)
After 15 years of lawsuits and community battles, paving has finally begun on the third runway at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports


Thiel on Poker as a Sport (2007-08-03)
This week, in our conversation with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel, Art has something he wants to get off his chest. It has to do with poker - as a sport. He talked with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick.


It's the Dog Days of Summer, But Don't Forget to Vote (2007-08-03)
It's the dog days of summer, but ballots are arriving in mailboxes in Washington this week. That's because the September primary has been moved to August. It's the earliest primary in state history. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Backcountry Skiers Pursue Turns All Year (2007-08-03)
When it's 80 degrees and sunny, skiing is probably the last thing you're thinking of. But some Northwesterners just can't get snow off the brain. Among them are some die-hards who tally impressive streaks of year-round skiing without leaving the Northwest. KPLU's Tom Banse grabbed his ski poles to meet the people who carve turns all year round.


Backcountry Skiers Pursue Turns All Year (2007-08-03)
When it's 80 degrees and sunny, skiing is probably the last thing you're thinking of. But some Northwesterners just can't get snow off the brain. Among them are some die-hards who tally impressive streaks of year-round skiing without leaving the Northwest. KPLU's Tom Banse grabbed his ski poles to meet the people who carve turns all year round.


Backcountry Skiers Pursue Turns All Year (2007-08-03)
When it's 80 degrees and sunny, skiing is probably the last thing you're thinking of. But some Northwesterners just can't get snow off the brain. Among them are some die-hards who tally impressive streaks of year-round skiing without leaving the Northwest. KPLU's Tom Banse grabbed his ski poles to meet the people who carve turns all year round.


Death Penalty for Sea Lions Considered on Two Fronts (2007-08-03)
The sea lions that gather each spring to feast on endangered Columbia River fish are moving closer to facing the death penalty. There was action on two fronts yesterday. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Property Owners Appeal Salmon Ruling (2007-08-02)
The fight over how much protection Northwest salmon need is heating up again. A coalition of property owners and business groups wants to overturn a federal court ruling they say will lead to costly regulations. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Governor Wants Sex Offender Report in 30 Days (2007-08-02)
Governor Chris Gregoir says she's prepared to call a special legislative session to close loopholes in sex offender laws. But only if a panel she's appointed makes that recommendation. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Market Warning Signs (2007-08-02)
The Dow Jones Industrial Average hit its all time high in early July, but has tumbled in recent days. What are the warning signs that the market is about to drop? Financial Commentator Greg Heberlein spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Salmon Dispute Bound for Higher Court (2007-08-02)
Some business and property rights groups are saying a federal judge was wrong when he recently ruled hatchery salmon are different from wild salmon. They want a higher court to overturn the ruling, which they say will lead to unnecessary regulations. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Why Puget Sound Real Estate Bucks National Trend (2007-08-02)
The northwest is a bright spot in an otherwise faltering national housing market. When stocks took a dive last week, many analysts blamed it on mortgage woes and dramatically falling home prices around the country. Yet housing prices in the greater Seattle area continue to rise. As KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp explains, the northwest economy is often out of synch with national trends. (3:16)


Sound Transit Adding Train (2007-08-02)
Many commuters are scrambling for options for when the big repairs to I-5 begin at the end of next week. Sound Transit is trying to ease the pain by adding to its Sounder Train schedule between Seattle and Puyallup. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:03)


Oregon Farmers Find Their Thrill with Blueberries (2007-08-01)
SUmmer in the northwest is a time for fruits and vegetables. Fans of fresh produce love to brouse farmers markets and roadside stands for their favorites. An increasingly popular choice is the blueberry. And Oregon is becoming one of the nation's leading producers. KPLU's Chris Lehman has more.


Hanford Leak Clean Up (2007-08-01)
Offials are meeting to discuss how to clean up the spill of radioactive waste that occurred at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation on Friday. KPLU's Anna King reports.


GOP Jumps on Sex Offender Issue (2007-08-01)
Last year, Washington lawmakers passed a spate of new laws aimed at sex offenders. Republicans say it's still not enough. They point to the recent kidnapping and murder of a Tacoma Girl. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


West Nile Season Here (2007-08-01)
Get out your mosquito repellent. Public health leaders warn it's the season for West Nile Virus, and say the first line of defense is you. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Food for Thought: Menu Nutritional Info Listener Feedback (2007-08-01)
Listener response was lively to last week's Food for Thought, in which KPLU's Dick Stein and Seattle Times Restaurant critic Nancy Leson discussed King County's new nutritional information requirements for certain restaurants in less than flattering terms.


Food for Thought: Menu Nutritional Info Listener Feedback (2007-08-01)
Listener response was lively to last week's Food for Thought, in which KPLU's Dick Stein and Seattle Times Restaurant critic Nancy Leson discussed King County's new nutritional information requirements for certain restaurants in less than flattering terms.


Tsunami Learning Exchange: West Coast to Indian Ocean (2007-08-01)
In the wake of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the US government is spending millions to help South Asian nations develop a robust warning system. Part of that aid money went to the University of Washington and NOAA for an international training program. The first class is now underway here. KPLU's Tom Banse has more from Aberdeen.


Buying Curtains to get Profits (2007-07-31)
The Tacoma Dome is thinking small to stay in the black. It wants a 4.1-million-dollar loan to help it attract more touring acts. They don't usually play huge venues like the dome. But as KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp explains, lots of venues currently have that same idea. (1:15)


Washington Waters "Over-nourished" (2007-07-31)
Estuaries are where rivers meet the sea. They're crucial to a region's environmental health. A federal report finds Puget Sound is in better shape in one key way than many estuaries on the East and Gulf Coasts. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


"Beaver Deceiver" Saves Salmon (2007-07-30)
Sometimes when you're trying to save one species, you bump up against another. Scientists working with Seattle City Light think they may have solved one of these conflicts with a homemade contraption they call The Beaver Deceiver. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains


Key to SIDS May Be Inner Ear (2007-07-30)
A doctor at Children's Hospital in Seattle says he may have found a key to unlocking the mystery of SUdden Infant Death Syndrome, or "crib death." He found a clue in routine hearing tests babies get just after they're born. KPLU's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Shrinking the Tacoma Dome (2007-07-30)
The huge blue and gray Tacoma Dome is now nearly 25 years old. Voters have rejected two recent bond measures to upgrade it. Now, the Tacoma City Council is voting on whether to loan the facility $4.1 million dollars - to help it stay in the black. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:03)


NW Forests to Benefit from Repentant Climate Sinners (2007-07-30)
National forests in the Northwest are first in line to benefit from a Forest Service foray into "carbon offsets." That new program allows people to donate money to curb their personal role in global warming. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Blogging the I-5 Closure (2007-07-30)
The biggest Seattle highway closure ever is less than two weeks away. Road repairs will close at least two northbound lanes of I- 5 just south of downtown starting a week from Friday. Transportation officials have set up an internet blog about the coming traffic mess. Drivers are using it to prepare, to grouse and to goof around. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty...


ACORN Workers Charged (2007-07-27)
King County is calling it a serious act of vandalism against the voting public. Seven people have been criminally charged for submitting nearly eighteen hundred (1800) voter registration cards with false information. They worked for a local chapter of the low-income advocacy group, ACORN. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:39)


Jewish Federation Shooting Anniversary (2007-07-27)
A year ago this Saturday, a man opened fire at the Jewish Federation Building in downtown Seattle, killing one woman and seriously injuring five others. Today the building has been redesigned to help employees feel safe at work. KPLU's Daysha Eaton has more. (1:05)


Schoolyard Toxic Cleanups (2007-07-27)
Playgrounds at a pair of Tacoma-area schools are the latest to get a toxic cleanup courtesy of the state. They're among more than 80 playgrounds found to be contaminated with lead and arsenic. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Thiel on NBA Referee Gambling (2007-07-27)
NBA referee Tim Donaghy is being investigated by the FBI for allegedly betting on basketball games in which he officiated. John Maynard talked with Seattle PI sports columnist Art Thiel about the situation.


Puget Sound Restoration Gears Up (2007-07-26)
It's been barely three weeks since the new agency in charge of cleaning up Puget Sound became official. At the group's first public meeting, the enormity of the job became clear. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty was there


The Dow vs the S&P 500 (2007-07-26)
When it comes to tracking the performance of the stock market, many analysts prefer the S&P 500. But KPLU financial commentator Greg Heberlein likes the Dow Jones Industrial Average. He explains why to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Greener Homes Changing from an Option to the Rule (2007-07-26)
Are you struggling to figure out how this new concept of a "carbon footprint" applies to your life? The global warming gases generated by your car of your commute are a part of it. But another big chunk of our carbon footprint is overlooked. It's our homes. One Northwest state is zeroing in on the energy efficiency of new homes. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Seattle Mayor's Middle Class Housing Proposal (2007-07-26)
If you earn an average income in Seattle and you don't own a home, chances are you'll have a hard time getting into the housing market. You might not even be able to afford rental housing in the city. Mayor Greg Nickels wants to change that by expanding tax breaks for developers of affordable housing. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:09)


False Voter Registrations (2007-07-26)
King County says it will not tolerate attacks on its voter registration system. Seven people have been charged with fraud for submitting nearly 18-hundred forged registration cards in King County. The names are being removed from voter rolls. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:15)


"Meth Mouth" Bills (2007-07-25)
One way to scare kids about methamphetamines is to show them pictures of what the drug does to teeth. Now, two Washington congressmen want to beef-up federal spending on the condition known as meth mouth. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Study Projects Impact of Sea Level Rise (2007-07-25)
Puget Sound has about 25-hundred miles of shoreline. How would that be affected by the predicted sea level rise caused by global warming? A new report tries to answer that question. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Food for Thought: Menu Nutritional Info (2007-07-25)
How much information do you want on your menu? ON today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein discuss King County's recent decision to require nutritional information on chain restaurant menus.


Food for Thought: Menu Nutritional Info (2007-07-25)
How much information do you want on your menu? ON today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein discuss King County's recent decision to require nutritional information on chain restaurant menus.


More Affordable Housing Needed in Seattle (2007-07-25)
Average working people are being priced out of the housing market in Seattle. Mayor Greg Nickels says he wants to change that with expanded tax breaks for developers. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:11)


Sea Level Rise Threatens Shoreline Habitat (2007-07-24)
A new report says salmon, seabirds and other Northwest wildlife would be hit hard by rising sea levels caused by global warming over the coming decades. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains


Celilo Residents Move Into Temporary Houses (2007-07-24)
The Army Corps of Engineers is making good on a 50-year old promise to build new housing at an historic tribal village. This month, a small band of Columbia River Indians are moving into temporary homes. It's happening at Celilo Village, a legendary gathering place for Northwest Tribes near The Dalles, Oregon. KPLU's Anna King visited with the residents of Celilo, on moving day.


Brick by Brick (2007-07-24)
In post-Katrina New Orleans, a project with northwest roots is making its mark on the rebuilding effort. It aims to preserve more of the original by rethinking how damaged buildings get taken apart. In the process, familiar conservation concepts like re-use' and recycle'serve a purpose well beyond environmentalism. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson went to check it out.


Indian Law Bar (2007-07-23)
It's nail-biting time for aspiring lawyers. They'll be taking the Washington State Bar exam starting Tuesday in Bellevue. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, for the first time students have had to study up on Indian law.


Airport Surplus Sales (2007-07-23)
Ever wonder what happens to all that stuff that is confiscated at the airport? A lot of the knives, corkscrews and baseball bats taken away at Washington, Oregon and Idaho airports become government property and end up for sale. KPLU's Anna King went to Washington states surplus store to peruse the wares.


No Arrests Yet Under Sunnyside Gang Law; Report Criticizes "Get Tough" Laws (2007-07-23)
It's been two months since Sunnyside, Washington passed a controversial anti-gang ordinance. Since then Yakima and the town of Union Gap - also in the Yakima Valley - have followed suit. But surprisingly, so far in Sunnyside, no one's been arrested under the new law. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Veterans Protected Under New Law (2007-07-23)
Washington has one of the broadest civil rights statutes in the country -- and it just got even broader. Its protections now extend to honorably discharged veterans. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:14)


Birds on Steroids (2007-07-23)
What do birds have in common with some notorious baseball sluggers? Both, apparently, rely on steroids. That's what some University of Washington researchers have found. KPLU's Paula Wissel has the story.


Vanpool Special (2007-07-23)
Seattle-area drivers are bracing themselves for nightmarish commutes next month. The Department of Transportation is shrinking the I-5 corridor south of downtown to two or three lanes in August. But they're also encouraging potential relief with a special deal on public vanpools. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.(1:02)


Farm Bill Sustainability (2007-07-23)
Every five years, lobbyists and trade groups for a wide range of agricultural interests descend on the nation's capital to wrangle over the federal farm bill. Right now, Congress is hammering out the complex legislation and supporters of organic and sustainable farming in Washington state are struggling to get a larger share of the pie. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


New Blues Releases (2007-07-20)
Some Blues veterans are making some new music. In our music commentary this month, KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talks with All Blues Host John Kessler about some of the more notable new releases.


Thiel on Bennett's Latest Move (2007-07-20)
Sonics owner Clay Bennett is calling for a resumption of talks with political, business and civic leaders to try to re-ignite discussions on a new arena in the Seattle area. He made a whirlwind stop in Seattle this week to meet with officials and the media. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about what Bennett had to say.


A New Approach to Marine Conservation (2007-07-20)
A federal commission has recommended a new, broad-based approach to protecting the environment. Now, San Juan County is taking the lead in putting that philosophy into action. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


NW States Bookend Governors' Disclosure Policy (2007-07-20)
States in the northwest are at the top and the bottom of a new study that looks at how much personal information Governors are required to disclose. KPLU's Chris Lehman has more.


Trial Lawyers and Insurance Companies Ready to Battle (2007-07-20)
Get ready for another fight between trial lawyers and insurance companies. It appears Referendum 67 is headed to the fall ballot. It deals with whether insurance companies can be sued when they deny a claim. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Rubber Duck Flotilla (2007-07-20)
The British press is all a-twitter about what they're calling the Rubber Duck Invasion Fleet. But the Seattle scientist who's been tracking the wayward bath toys for 15 years says the fuss is way overblown. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Extended Hours Trading (2007-07-19)
The US stock market opens at 6:30 in the morning and closes at one in the afternoon. But you can also trade during "extended hours." Financial commentator Greg Heberlein explains it to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


What's in a Chip? Too Much Information, Privacy Advocates Say (2007-07-19)
They're tiny radio transmitters, put in library books, car keys, and the new U-S passport. Next year, Washington State will put radio tags in what it calls an enhanced' driver's license. But will that give government the license to spy? Lawmakers, scientists and privacy advocates will debate the possibilities and pitfalls of so-called RFID technology at a forum today at the University of Washington. KPLU's Cathy Duchamp reports.


Drugstore Cowboys: Feds Crack Prolific Pharmacy Burglary Ring (2007-07-19)
Federal authorities have cracked the most prolific pharmacy burglary ring in the Northwest, if not the nation. The break-in artists hit dozens of deug stores in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and California between 2004 and 2006. Their targe: heavy duty painkillers like OxyContin that can sell for three time their value on the street. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has the story of one of the ringleaders.


San Juans To Protect Marine Ecosystems (2007-07-19)
The San Juan Islands are the first place on the West Coast - and perhaps in the nation -- to adopt a new approach to protecting the marine environment. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains


Trans Fat Ban & Menu Labeling (2007-07-19)
Restaurant owners call it government interference. But some elected officials on the King County Board of Health say they've waited long enough to take a stand on a public health crisis. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Housing Squeeze (2007-07-18)
Seattle plans to spend eight million dollars building homes for the poor and homeless. But critics say it doesn't begin to make up for the loss of low income housing. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports.


Water Tank Inspection Scam (2007-07-18)
Did you shell out money a few years ago to have your hot water tank or electrical panel inspected? Then you might be in for a refund. The state has reached a settlement with several businesses it says misled consumers. KPLU law and justice reporter Paula WIssel has the story.


Northwest Dominates List of Affordable Western Suburbs (2007-07-18)
What does Eagle, Idaho have in common with Olympia, Washington? They're both on a list of most affordable suburbs in the west. KPLU's Chris Lehman explains.


Nightclub Hit List (2007-07-18)
Seattle's mayor has drawn up a hit list. On it are what he says are the city's eight most violent nightclubs and bars. He's sent it to the city council as proof there's a need for a tough new nightclub ordinance. Not everyone is happy about it. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has more.


NW Troops Repay a Debt by Sponsoring Iraqi Refugees (2007-07-18)
Iraqi refugees have begun to trickle into the Northwest. They're mostly translators who assisted Northwest soldiers on deployment in Iraq. In some instances, local troops are repaying a debt by sponsoring the Iraqi immigrants. KPLU's Tom Banse has a profile of one Iraqi whos arrival could be a sign of things to come.


Theories Buzz Around Bee Deaths (2007-07-18)
A mysterious phenomenon dubbed "colony collapse disorder" is causing quite the buzz in the beekeeping and farming world. Washington State University is bringing its research firepower to the search for the cause of a reported honeybee die-off. At the same time, an Oregon State University bee expert shares doubts that this syndrome represents anything out of the ordinary. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Food for Thought: Summer Tomatoes (2007-07-18)
Summer is here, and that means one thing to Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson, fresh produce. On today's Food for Thought she chats with KPLU's Dick Stein about one of her favorites: Tomatoes.


Smokey Bear Headed for Myspace and Cell Phones (2007-07-17)
The forecast for cooler, damper weather this week should help firefighters who are keeping busy with nearly two dozen wildfires across the inland Northwest. While we're on the subject of fire, when's the last time you saw or heard from Smokey Bear? The Forest Service's ad agency is revamping its iconic fire prevention campaign. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Seattle Aims for Zero Waste (2007-07-17)
Seattle hasd set ambitious gals for boosting recycling and reducing the garbage it throws away. They city council unanimously passed a measure it hopes will lead to a future of zero waste. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Oregon Coho Flirt With Threatened List Again (2007-07-17)
One of the few Pacific Northwest salmon populations NOT on the endangered species list may join its fellow fish there. A federal magistrate has recommended that Oregon Coast coho be reevaluated for listing. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Biscuit Fire: Five Years Later (2007-07-17)
Five years ago, a bolt of lighting started what would grow into the largest recorded wildfire in Oregon history. Nearly half a million acres of forest land burned. But after the flames died down, a rhetorical firestorm sprang up over the practice of salvage logging. That's when forest managers haul away tree trunks left standing after a blaze. There are questions about how much it hurts the forest and how much it helps the economy. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Ex-Boeing Employee Arraigned (2007-07-17)
A former Boeing employee will be arraigned Tuesday on 16 counts of theft. He says he's a whistleblower. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp reports.


Inspection Scam (2007-07-17)
Did you shell out money a few years ago to have your hot water tank or electrical panel inspected? Then you might be in for a refund. The state has reached a settlement with several businesses it says misled consumers. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


Ex-Patients to Work at Mental Hospital (2007-07-16)
Western State Mental Hospital, near Tacoma has been trying to reduce its use of seclusion and restraints. It's part of a shift toward increased patient input and respect. Now, Western is taking that idea a step further. The hospital wants patients who have been discharged to return to Western - this time to work as employees. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt has our story.


Casual Games Conference (2007-07-16)
They say it's the fastest-growing segment of the video game industry. So-called casual games are cute and colorful, arcade-style games that can be played on any platform. Seattle is ground-zero for the industry and about twelve hundred people are expected to attend the annual casual games conference here tomorrow (Tuesday 7-17). More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:45)


More Tolls Coming (2007-07-16)
The new Narrows Bridge opened for the first time to vehicles this morning, the first state road to charge tolls in more than 20 years. More tolls are on the way, as KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Washington Farmworkers Win Class Action Lawsuit (2007-07-16)
When Northwest farmers need workers, they sometimes call a national labor contractor. These are companies that bring-in foreign guest workers on a special Visa. Last week one of these companies lost a class-action lawsuit. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports on the fallout.


No Brownouts on the Horizon (2007-07-16)
Hot summer weather often puts a squeeze on power supplies, as people crank up their air conditioners. A new study says the Northwest should have plenty of electricity to meet rising demand - but it might get pricey. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Thiel on Ichiro Deal (2007-07-13)
Mariners' All Star centerfielder Ichiro Suzuki is signing a five-year contract extension worth an estimated $90 million dollars. Is he worth it? Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel thinks so. He talked with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick.


Biodiesel Comes Under Fire (2007-07-13)
The skyrocketing growth of investment in plant-based fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel is triggering a backlash from some environmentalists. They say biofuels aren't necessarily clean and green. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Bellevue Gets Streetwise Segway (2007-07-13)
Federal law requires cities to make sidewalks accessible for people with disabilities. But till now, few jurisdictions have complied. Many say that's because of the high cost and complexity of surveying the pavement. The city of Bellevue has a new solution that may soon be used nationwide. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.(1:05)


Economic Diversity the Equestrian Way (2007-07-13)
What do you do when your community loses hundreds of jobs? In rural Northwest towns the impact can be especially hard. One solution for Lewis County is horses. KPLU's Cathy Duchamp explains.


Second Quarter Northwest Stocks (2007-07-12)
Financial commentator Greg Heberlein has been tracking Northwest stocks for the past 22 years. He tells KPLU's Dave Meyer the list of top stocks for the second quarter of 2007 is completely different from the list ten years ago.


Environmentalists Protest Biodiesel Firm (2007-07-12)
Biofuels -- made from plants instead of petroleum -- are being hailed as a clean, green way to power our cars and buses. But some conservationists want to slow down the rush toward ethanol and biodiesel. They point out that those fuels have heavy environmental costs of their own. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Truck Bombs Simulated in East Idaho Desert (2007-07-12)
Engineers at the Idaho National Lab have detonated the first of what could be a series of simulated truck bombs. The explosive experiments to help design structures better able to withstand terrorist attacks KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Meet the New Narrows Bridge (2007-07-12)
People love suspension bridges. Their swayed cables and majestic stance paint elegant lines against the geography they span. Think of the Golden Gate, or the Brooklyn Bridge. It's also true of the Tacoma Narrows, built in 1950. On Sunday, thousands of people will celebrate the opening of a new Narrows suspension bridge built parallel to the old one. KPLU's Gary Davis takes us on a tour of the new span that's transforming an icon.


Bellevue using Streetwise Segway for ADA Survey (2007-07-12)
Remember the Segway Human Transporter? It's a kind of scooter that you stand on to zoom across sidewalks as an alternative to walking or riding a bike. The City of Bellevue is using a very special one to help it comply with federal laws. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:08)


Orca Protection in Canada Takes a Step (2007-07-12)
Canada is taking steps toward giving orca whales the same kind of protection they're starting to get in Washington. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


The Man Who Fell From "Galloping Gertie" (2007-07-12)
The new Tacoma Narrows Bridge project, which employed hundreds of workers, is about to finish with NO worker fatalities. That wasn't the case with the first two spans. Four workers were killed while building the existing Narrows Bridge. And one man died during construction of Galloping Gertie, the first bridge. Somehow, though, one worker fell off that bridge -- and survived. He was the uncle of KPLU's Gary Davis, who has our story.


How to Restock NW Lakes? Kill All the Fish and Start Over (2007-07-12)
To non-fisherman it might seem like a radical idea: kill off all the fish in a lake in order to rebalance the fish population. Northwest wildlife managers have been doing this since the 1950s. As KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports, the practice continues today.


Loonie Approaches Parity with Greenback (2007-07-11)
The Candadian dollar reached a 30-year high versus the greenback in currency trading this week. That makes your next vacation to Canada more expensive. But there's an upside for some businesses on the US side of the border. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Virginia Mason's Lean Methods May Hurt Bottom Line (2007-07-11)
A delegation of air force officials arrives in Seattle today (Wednesday) to spend a day at Virginia Mason Medical Center. They want to learn more about how the hospital is improving care and cutting costs through methods learned in Japan. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (2:00)


Insurance Commissioner Slams Privatized Medicare (2007-07-11)
Hundreds of seniors in Washington have filed complaints about Medicare Advantage. That's a kind of Medicare coverage offered by private insurance companies. The complaints say the plans are confusing, and that insurers misrepresent what services are covered. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty


Food For Thought: Tiny Food (2007-07-11)
KPLU's Dick Stein thinks that sometimes smaller is... well, just smaller. As he expresses to Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson on today's Food for Thought.


Canada Moves Forward on Orca Protection (2007-07-11)
The orca whales that Puget Sound residents like to think of as "theirs" actually spend a lot of time in Canadian waters. Now, Canada is moving toward giving the whales the same kind of endangered species protection they're beginning to get in the U.S. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story.


Feds Seek to Expedite Geothermal Energy Leasing (2007-07-10)
The federal government wants to launch an aggressive program to tap more of the geothermal energy that lies beneath our feet. Yesterday in Boise and later this month in Portland, the government is inviting the public to suggest places most suitable for drilling. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Goodloe-Johnson Arrives (2007-07-10)
Teachers, staff, and students in the Seattle school district are meeting their new superintendent this week. Dr. Maria Goodloe-Johnson spent her first day on the job visiting two schools. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Virginia Mason Efficiency Update (2007-07-10)
The Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle is getting attention from the Pentagon. Fifty-nine guests from the U.S. Air Force are taking a look at the hospital's methods for reducing costs and improving quality of care. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:13)


Private Medicare Plans Criticized (2007-07-10)
Nearly 20 percent of seniors enrolled in Medicare have signed up for plans offered through private insurance companies, so-called Medicare Advantage plans. Now, consumer advocates -- and state Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler -- say those plans are failing taxpayers and the elderly. KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports.


Goodloe-Johnson Arrives, Part 2 (2007-07-10)
It's the first day on the job for Seattle's new school superintendent, Dr. Maria Goodloe-Johnson. She spent the day touring two Seattle schools in a yellow school bus. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt went along for the ride.


China-US Trade (2007-07-09)
Shipping an airline part to China will be as easy as sending it to Cleveland. That's one of the goals of a new trade agreement signed in Seattle. It will also make it easier for people in the US to travel to China. KPLU's Paula Wissel has the story.


Boeing Rollout Excites Customer Airlines (2007-07-09)
All eyes were on Boeing as the company raised the curtain on its newest jet, the 787, also known as the Dreamliner. Thousands of employees and VIPs from around the world crowded into the company's assembly plant in Everett. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp was there.


Employees Flock to Boeing Rollout (2007-07-09)
It's the kind of party that only happens every couple of decades. Boeing's newest jet rolled out onto the tarmac in Everett. Live music, slick videos and satellite feeds from around the world celebrated the first fully assembled 7-8-7. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp was there. (2:01)


Flights to China (2007-07-09)
Getting to China will soon be a little easier. The U-S and Chinese governments have signed an agreement to double the number of passenger flights between the two countries. KPLU's Paula Wissel has more.


Boeing 787 Rollout Already Drawing Crowds (2007-07-06)
Journalists and airline executives from around the world have arrived in Seattle. They're here to learn more about Boeing's 7-8-7. The rollout of the all-new jet is Sunday. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:00)


Thiel on Sonics New Coach (2007-07-06)
He's led professional and college basketball teams in the past. Those dual talents may come in handy as P.J. Carlesimo takes over as the new head coach of the Sonics. The team's star veteran players are gone. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about what that means for next season.


Treaty Rights Battle Ends With Settlement (2007-07-06)
Years of legal wrangling over the treaty rights of Puget Sound Indian tribes to harvest oysters and other shellfish has ended in a settlement. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more ...


Heat Wave Puts Snake River Fish in Hot Water (2007-07-06)
The triple-digit heat in the inland Northwest has got water managers working to cool down the Snake River to protect threatened fish. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


787 Fuel Efficiency is Good, Can Get Better (2007-07-06)
If you want to reduce your environmental impact, in the future, flying might be better than driving. Boeing says its new 7-8-7 jet is so fuel efficient that it beats a standard sedan or SUV. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:00)


Starbucks Facing Anti-union Allegations (2007-07-06)
Starbucks has long enjoyed a reputation as an excellent place to work. But now, Baristas in New York have compared the coffee giant to Wal-mart -- for a series of attempts at union-bashing. The National Labor Relations Board is backing the union, and lawyers on both sides of the issue will argue before a New York judge on Monday (7-9-07) morning. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:16)


Appeals Court Stors Forest Thinning in North Idaho (2007-07-05)
A federal appeals court has stopped logging on several thousand acres in north Idaho. Environmental groups that filed the lawsuit hope it teaches the Forest Service a lesson. But it may also cost dozens of people their jobs. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Appeals Court Stors Forest Thinning in North Idaho (2007-07-05)
A federal appeals court has stopped logging on several thousand acres in north Idaho. Environmental groups that filed the lawsuit hope it teaches the Forest Service a lesson. But it may also cost dozens of people their jobs. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Appeals Court Stors Forest Thinning in North Idaho (2007-07-05)
A federal appeals court has stopped logging on several thousand acres in north Idaho. Environmental groups that filed the lawsuit hope it teaches the Forest Service a lesson. But it may also cost dozens of people their jobs. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


When to Invest (2007-07-05)
If you invest in the stock marketr or were thinking about investing, how do you know when it's the right time? Financial commentator Greg Heberlein explores that question with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Shellfish Settlement Ends Long Legal Fight (2007-07-05)
A court battle between Puget Sound Indian tribes and commercial shellfish growers has ended in what both sides are calling a win-win settlement. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Microsoft Expanding Xbox Warrantee (2007-07-05)
Microsoft is taking a one billion (b) dollar charge against its earnings for the fourth quarter. It says too many of its Xbox 360 video game consoles have succumbed to a general hardware failure. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:52)


A Fresh Look at the Road Most Traveled (2007-07-05)
If you're in the habit of making the five hour drive from Seattle to Spokane along Interstate 90, chances are you grit your teethand hope the time passes quickly. If so, you're missing out. A new audio heritage tour could open your eyes to a new way of seeing that seemingly unremarkable stretch of road. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson takes us on the journey.


NW Teens Vie for Job Picking-Up Roadside Trash (2007-07-05)
In the old days, you used to see inmate chain gangs doing hard labor along the highway. These days you're more likely to see a gang of teenagers. Across the Northwest, during the summer months, youth crews get paid to pick-up roadside litter. As KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports it may be a dirty, dangerous job - but it's surprisingly competitive.


Food for Thought: Grilling Challenged (2007-07-04)
If Neanderthals could make fire, then why not our own Dick Stein? Because he's grilling-challenged, that's why! Stein talks about "the art of grilling" with Seattle Times Restaurant Critic Nancy Leson on today's food for thought.


Visions of a New Mosquito Fleet (2007-07-03)
Riding on a boat would be a more relaxing and efficient way to travel than sitting stuck in traffic. That's the vision for a new fleet of passenger-only water-taxis that would connect communities throughout Puget Sound. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:18)


Cable Median Barriers Work; Most of the Time (2007-07-03)
Cable barriers in highway medians stop head-on collisions, most of the time. That's the upshot of a long-awaited study by the State of Washington. The Governor ordered the study after a series of fatal accidents on Interstate 5 North of Everett. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details.


Beef and Bison, Makes Beefalo (2007-07-03)
What do you get when you cross a cow with a buffalo? You get a sleepy cottage industry that's just recieved an injection of cash, which should introduce more consumers to the hybrid meat. The combination of buffalo and beef cattle goes by the name "beefalo." KPLU's Tom Banse has a look and taste from Ellensburg.


787 Rollout Preview Tour (2007-07-02)
You've probably heard by now that Boeing has a radically new jet. The first seven eight seven, known as the Dreamliner, rolls out Sunday afternoon at the factory in Everett. As many as 50-thousand employees are expected to watch the unveiling on a big screen at Qwest Field. It's a major milestone. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp went to find out what's so special about this new jet. (5:03)


Group Pushing for Expansion of Passenger Only Ferries (2007-07-02)
Years ago, small boats known as the mosquito fleet connected communities around Puget Sound. Now momentum is building for a vision to bring back more passenger-only ferries. A symposium on the topic takes place tonight (Monday.) More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:07)


Degree Programs in Wind Energy (2007-07-02)
A Northwest college has invented a degree that virtually guarantees its graduates a good-paying job. Oregon's Columbia Gorge Community College is the first in the region to create a degree program for wind-energy technicians. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Gas Tax Goes Up 2 Cents a Gallon (2007-07-02)
Today's comute to work is going to cost you a bit more. That's because the state gas tax went up two cents over the weekend. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Buffalo and the New West (2007-07-02)
When you hear about environmentalists battling developers or timber companies, you may not realize the stroy can be traced back to the buffalo and the Old West. That's the theory of author Michale Punke. His new book show how the demise of the buffalo led to a new western ethic of conservation. He talks with KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld.


Thiel on Sonics Draft (2007-06-29)
The recent NBA draft created some big changes for the Seattle Sonics. John Maynard sat in for KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and talked with Seattle PI sports columnist Art Thiel. (3:50)


Shelton Immigration Raid (2007-06-29)
When immigration agents raided an apartment complex in Shelton last month, the phone started ringing at the local elementary school. The principal says he was thrown into a crisis he'd never before experienced. Now, nearly a month later, that principal is telling his story. And a top immigration cop in the Northwest is defending his agents' tactics. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports. (3:43)


Pemco Poll Finds Wealthy Drivers More Reckless (2007-06-29)
If you're annoyed by drivers who speed or talk on their cell phones while driving, here's another tid-bit to set you off. They're typically wealthier than average. That's just one of the findings of a new poll from Seattle-based Pemco Insurance. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:12)


What is Six Feet Across and Weighs Up to a Ton? An Eagle's Nest (2007-06-29)
Here's a test: what's six feet across, weighs up to a ton and sits near the top of a tree? If you guessed an eagle's nest you're correct. And yes, the nests can weigh that much. Yesterday, the Feds officially took the bird off the endangered species list. The Northwest is one place eagle numbers have gone up dramatically. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports. (1:12)


Green Nails (2007-06-28)
Nail salons are full of chemicals and fumes that can cause health problems such as asthma and cancer. The Environmental Protection Agency is trying to change that. KPLU's Daysha Eaton has more. (1:03)


Supreme Court Rules Against Seattle Schools (2007-06-28)
The Supreme Court has ruled against the Seattle school district in a landmark case regarding the use of race to determine student assignments. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis has been following reaction to the ruling.


Bloomberg's Fortune (2007-06-28)
For a man who says he's not running, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is getting a lot of attention as a possible presidential candidate. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein doesn't know what Bloomberg's political plans are but he can tell us how the mayor made his billions. He spoke with KPLU's Dave Meyer. (3:43)


Restaurant Names (2007-06-27)
What's in a name? Less than you might think, when it comes to restaurants as Seattle Times restaurant critic explains to KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought. (3:38)


Gonzales in Seattle (2007-06-27)
Sometimes it's what you don't say that's the most noticeable. Speaking in Seattle, U-S Attorney General Alberto Gonzales did not mention any of the controversies surrounding him. Here's KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel.


Prescription Drug Thefts on the Rise in Northwest (2007-06-27)
It's not just bank tellers and 7-11 clerks who have to worry about armed hold-ups. Increasingly pharmacists find themselves looking down the barrel of a gun or at the blade of a knife. Police say drugstore burglaries and robberies are on the rise in the Northwest. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports. (:54)


Labeling Teens (2007-06-26)
What runs through your mind when you see a group of teenagers sauntering by in baggy jeans? Do you immediately think, they must be in a gang. If so, a group of kids in Tacoma has something to say to you. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports.


Flight Attendant Wings Through Lifetime of Airline Change (2007-06-26)
Fair warning if you're flying Alaska Airlines for the rest of this month. Some flight attendants might look like they got lost in a costume shop on the way to the airport. They region's dominant airline is dressing crews in classic uniforms to celebrate its 75th anniversary. KPLU's Tom Banse profiles a 40-year veteran who says despite all of the changes in the air, flight attendant is still a good career. (3:38)


Labeling Teens (2007-06-26)
What runs through your mind when you see a group of teenagers sauntering by in baggy jeans? Do you immediately think, they must be in a gang. If so, a group of kids in Tacoma has something to say to you. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports.


Washington Prisons Chief May Face Union No-Confidence Vote (2007-06-26)
The chief of Washington prisons is facing a possible no-confidence vote. A committee of union parole officers met over the weekend and approved a resolution. It questions Harold Clarke's level of support for the people in charge of monitoring ex-cons. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports. (:56)


Loggers and Greens Team Up Against a New Enemy (2007-06-25)
During the Forest Wars of the 1980s and '90s, you heard a lot about tree-sits and blockades to stop logging in old-growth forests. These days, in Western Washington, some of those environmental activists are joining with timber companies to fight what they see as a common enemy - suburban sprawl. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story


Balance -- a sixth sense? (2007-06-25)
Every day, more than 20,000 Americans fall down and seriously hurt themselves. They might stumble, or trip, or slip on a stairway. Many of these falls are preventable. Scientists and doctors are still learning about how balance works as a sense. It's the topic of a new book by Seattle author Scott McCredie. He talked with KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld:


WSU Deepens Its Roots With New Vineyard (2007-06-25)
Washington State University is the region's top agricultural college. Now it wants to make its Tri-Cities campus the place in the Northwest to learn about winemaking. KPLU's Anna King reports. (1:00)


Get Ready for Narrows Tolls (2007-06-25)
It's been nearly a generation since anyone paid a toll to cross a bridge in our state. That's about to end. Tolls will pay for the new Tacoma Narrows Bridge when it opens in mid July. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Where's Habeas? (2007-06-25)
There's an especially odd ad running in the classifieds in local newspapers. It reads: LOST! Habeas Corpus. The American Civil Liberties Union says a fundamental legal right is missing. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel explains.


Gregoire Blocks Wind Farm (2007-06-23)
Wind energy may sound good on paper. But wind farm projects on the southern Oregon coast, along the Columbia River and in central Washington have generated fierce opposition. Now Governor Chris Gregoire has refused to approve one such controversial project. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Ammo Maker Takes Students (2007-06-23)
Students in the northwest with a head for engineering and an interest in weapons may soon have a new way to fire up their careers. The world's largest military and civil ammunition maker is planning to start a student internship program at its manufacturing plant in Idaho. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports.


Washington Republicans Question Effort to Insure Immigrant Kids (2007-06-22)
Should taxpayers foot the bill to insure illegal immigrant children? Especially when there isn't enough money to insure poor kids who are here legally? That's the question some Republicans in the state are asking. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports. (:57)


Roads to Nowhere (2007-06-22)
You can tell a lot about a person from their scars. The same is true for land. Northwest forests are riddled with old roads. They speak of the region's history of logging and mining. For years the Forest Service has been slowly working to decommission roads. It's asking Congress for a chunk of money to help. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports. (:53)


Grocery Workers Campaign (2007-06-22)
Unionized workers at four of the region's biggest grocery chains have launched a campaign asking Albertson's, Fred Meyer, QFC and Safeway to share the success. They say profits are up - and they want better pay and benefits and more predictable hours. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:12)


Thiel on Junior's Return to Seattle (2007-06-22)
Ken Griffey Junior and the Cincinnati Reds take-on the Mariners tonight at Safeco Field as part of inter-league play. It's the first time Griffey has played in Seattle since the Mariners traded him to the Reds in 2000. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about Junior's return and his impact on Mariner baseball.


Natural Gas Exploration Underway near Coos Bay and Chehalis (2007-06-21)
A Portland company is expanding its exploration for natural gas underneath coastal Northwest forestland. The public company, Torrent Energy, has secured natural gas drilling rights to more than a quarter million acres in southwest Washington and Oregon. KPLU's Tom Banse has more. (:53)


China Star Sells Northwest Cherries in Music Video (2007-06-21)
Washington is often called the most trade-dependent state in the nation. When it comes to agriculture, about a third of the state's crops are exported mostly to Asian countries. But marketing Northwest products overseas takes come creativity. KPLU's Austin Jenkins shows us what a Chinese pop star and Northwest cherries have in common.


Resolving Broker Disputes (2007-06-21)
A couple of months ago, financial commentator Greg Heberlein (HEB-er-len) explained the arbitration process for resolving disputes with your broker. In a follow-up discussion he tells KPLU's Dave Meyer it's best to try other solutions before going to arbitration.


Share the Success Campaign (2007-06-21)
Bright yellow yard signs are going up in neighborhoods around the Puget Sound region. It's not a political campaign. Unionized workers at major grocery chains want a bigger share of rising profits. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:04)


Online Learning On The Rise (2007-06-21)
It's the time of year when high school seniors don cap and gown. But nearly a third who start high school never graduate. Some districts see online learning as a way to help those students. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis has more.


Newspapers Committee Says Mission Accomplished - for now (2007-06-21)
A committee that has been a self-appointed watchdog on Seattle's two newspapers says its work is done - at least for now. The group wants to keep Seattle a two-newspaper town. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:09)


Hanford Workers Who Got Cancer May Get Compensation (2007-06-21)
Proof. It's hard to come by for thousands of people who believe they got cancer from working at the Hanford nuclear site in south-central Washington. Now, a government agency recommends that some of the workers should automatically get $150,000 if they got certain types of cancers. KPLU's Cathy Duchamp has more. (:52)


Black Crime Fighters (2007-06-20)
Nearly one in four prisoners in the state is African American. Often the crime victims are black as well. At a forum last night in Seattle's Rainier Valley, hundreds of African Americans gathered to talk about what they can do. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel was there.


Power Plant First in Region to Try Carbon Sequestration (2007-06-20)
A private energy consortium is proposing a big coal-fueled power plant near the Columbia River southeast of Pasco. Electricity from coal is increasingly controversial because of pollution that accelerates global warming. So the developers of this power plant are going to try a cutting-edge response. KPLU's Tom Banse reports. (:55)


Food for Thought: Locally Grown (2007-06-20)
The description locally grown has acquired a certain chic in the Puget Sound area and around the country. Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein discuss the phenomenon in today's Food for Thought. (3:52)


Committee for a Two Newspaper Town Withdraws Complaint (2007-06-20)
The Committee for a Two Newspaper Town has dropped its anti-trust complaint against the Seattle Times and Hearst, which owns the PI. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:04)


Immigration Through the Lens of Sixth Grade Girls (2007-06-19)
Were you ever an exchange student? Students who study abroad can have their eyes opened to the world. KPLU's Anna King has the story of a different kind of exchange program. It brings together students from two different worlds, who happen to live in the same state.


Washington and Idaho Sites Compete for Controversial Nuclear Recycling Facilities (2007-06-18)
If you live in the Northwest, here's an acronym you should know: G-NEP. It stands for Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. It's the Bush administration's initiative to expand the use of nuclear energy. The goal is to build more nuclear power plants and new facilities to treat the waste they produce. That's where the Northwest comes in. Three locations in Washington and Idaho are competing to become nuclear recycling centers. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Airbus on the Spot at Paris Air Show (2007-06-18)
The Paris air show has begun. Boeing is expected to shine at the week-long aerospace event of the year, with its fast-selling new 7-8-7. But all eyes are on Airbus. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:22)


Killing Mosquitoes (2007-06-18)
Seattle plans to inject a type of natural bacteria into its forty-six thousand storm drains. The goal is to eliminate the larvae of mosquitoes that carry the deadly West Nile virus. KPLU's Paula Wissel has the story.


2-1-1 Hotline Crisis (2007-06-18)
The 211 hotline is facing a crisis of its own. The three-digit number is for problems that aren't urgent enough for 911. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports the statewide service will cut its hours beginning July first.


West Nile Weapon (2007-06-18)
Seattle has a new weapon in the fight against West Nile Virus. Come July, crews will be killing mosquito larvae throughout the city. KPLU's Paula Wissel has more.


Thiel on Ichiro's Future (2007-06-15)
One question on the minds of a lot of Mariner fans this season is: will Ichiro stay or go? His contract is up this year. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about how he thinks things will play out.


Homeschoolers Convene in Puyallup (2007-06-15)
Homeschooling families are gathering for what they call the largest convention of its kind on the West Coast. More than four-thousand are expected at the Western Washington Fair Grounds in Puyallup today (Fri) and tomorrow (Sat). More from KPLU education reporter Gary Davis.


Backyard Birds in Trouble (2007-06-15)
Many of the birds that used to visit your backyard bird feeder are becoming more scarce. A study by the Audubon Society shows populations of many common bird species are taking a nosedive. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Your Past Can Catch Up with You at the Northern Border (2007-06-15)
Some travelers who used to so blithely cross the Canadian border are being tripped-up by indiscretions in their pasts. Thanks to improved databases and information sharing, border guards can now call up records of crimes that exclude you from entering Canada or the USA. And they just might Google you. KPLU's Tom Banse has the details. (3:49)


Endangered Rabbits Breed in Wild for First Time in Years (2007-06-15)
Some highly endangered pygmy rabbits got around to doing what rabbits are supposed to do. They bred in the wild for the first time in years. KPLU's Tom Banse has more. (:52)


Buying Bonds (2007-06-14)
Do you have bonds in your portfolio? Financial commentator Greg Heberlein tells KPLU's Dave Meyer that higher interest rates are making bonds more attractive to investors.


Washington Governor Kickstarts Re-Election Campaign with Seattle Fundraiser (2007-06-14)
It's not just the 2008 presidential race that's off to an early start. Democratic Governor Chris Gregoire kickstarted her re-election bid yesterday with a major fundraiser in Seattle. The event featured New York Governor Eliot Spitzer. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports. (:52)


Wind Energy Boosters Urge Governor's Approval of Kittitas Valley Wind Power Project (2007-06-14)
Green power advocates are calling on the governor to sign off on a wind power project in Eastern Washington. It would be the first since voters passed a clean energy initiative last fall. But local officials are urging the governor to kill the windfarm. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Former Icos Employees Help Found New TB Non-Profit (2007-06-14)
Tuberculosis has been on many people's minds lately - thanks to the recent news of Andrew Speaker, the honeymooner who boarded a plane in Atlanta with a dangerous form of the disease. Drug-resistant TB is becoming more common. And Seattle will now be home to a non-profit focused on it. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:18)


Study Sees Sharp Decline in Common Birds (2007-06-14)
Many formerly common backyard birds are becoming harder to find, including several well-known species in Washington. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


New Tuberculosis Non-Profit for Seattle (2007-06-13)
Seattle's status as a center for global health research continues to grow. Pharmaceuticals giant Eli Lilly has announced it's basing a new non-profit here that will develop drugs for tuberculosis. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:01)


Food for Thought: Pike Place Market (2007-06-13)
On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson talks with KPLU's Dick Stein about the rich past and present of the Pike Place Market. (3:00)


Washington State Smoking Ban Has Minimal Effect on Business (2007-06-13)
It's been a year and a half since Washington voters outlawed smoking in bars, restaurants, mini-casinos, and bowling alleys. How has this impacted business? The Department of Revenue says minimally. But some business owners disagree. KPLU's Austin Jenkins smokes out the details. (:56)


Washington Moves Presidential Primary to February; Will Other NW States Follow? (2007-06-12)
The state's presidential primary will move up from May to February 19, 2008. A bipartisan committee agreed on the new date yesterday. The new goal is to make Washington more of a player in presidential politics. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports. (:46)


Northwesterners Guzzling Less Gas (2007-06-12)
Here's an interesting statistic that you may have played a part in. And environmental think tank finds that Northwesterners are cutting back on gasoline at a faster rate than the rest of the country. KPLU's Tom Banse has more. (1:01)


Pit Bull Deadly Weapon (2007-06-12)
A pit bull is a deadly weapon. That's the ruling from a state appeals court. It upheld the conviction of a man whose dog attacked a police officer. More from KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel.


Back Off, Tailgater (2007-06-12)
Next time you're behind the wheel, take a look at the distance between you and the car in front of you. Are you too close? Police in a growing number of Northwest cities have a new high-tech tool for busting tailgaters. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports. (:52)


Seattle Center Upgrade Alternatives Unveiled (2007-06-12)
The Seattle Center is due for an upgrade, and it should become more than just a tourist attraction. That's the gist of the recommendations released today (Tuesday) by the citizens' Century 21 Committee, which is developing a plan that's expected to go before voters in November 2008. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:01)


San Juan County Seeks to Protect Whales (2007-06-11)
Someday soon, getting too close to the orca whales in the San Juan Islands could earn you a hefty fine. The San Juan County Council is considering an ordinance that would require boaters to keep their distance. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Adult Cabarets in Seattle (2007-06-11)
More strip clubs in Seattle? It's possible. The city council unanimously approved a new law that allows adult cabarets in any area zoned for commercial businesses. But some club owners say there are still too many restrictions. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel explains.


Washington and Oregon in Top Ten for Energy Efficiency (2007-06-11)
Washington and Oregon rank among the top ten most energy efficient states. But we could be doing even better. That's the upshot of a new report by the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Strip Club Law (2007-06-11)
Seattle could be getting some new strip clubs. The city council ended restrictions that have been in place for more than two decades. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


San Juan County Seeks to Protect Whales (2007-06-11)
Someday soon, getting too close to the orca whales in the San Juan Islands could earn you a hefty fine. The San Juan County Council is considering an ordinance that would require boaters to keep their distance. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Microsoft Surprised by Google Complaint (2007-06-11)
Another fight between Google and Microsoft is heating up. This time it's over the desktop search feature that allows you to look for files on your computer's hard drive. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:01)


WASL Scores Show Gains (2007-06-09)
The state's high school students scored higher grades on this spring's WASL. Test scores were released Friday. They showed gains in the number of kids who've now passed the reading, writing and math portions of the test. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis has more.


WASL Scores Rise (2007-06-09)
The state's high school students scored higher grades on this spring's WASL. Test scores were released today. They went up by at least seven percent in reading, writing and math. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis has more.


Boeing 787 Contractor LosesTop Executive (2007-06-08)
A top executive at a key partner for Boeing's 787 project is leaving. Vaught Aircraft Industries has fired vice president Ted Purdue, who was in charge of the new jetliner's fuselage assembly site in South Carolina. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:06)


Thiel on Mariners' Recent Wins (2007-06-08)
The Mariners have won a lot of games lately, including two this week in which they rallied in late innings to win. The M's are in second place in the American League West. That's not where many observers thought they would be at this point in the season. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about that.


Pro-Reform Advocate Underwent Immigration Transformation (2007-06-08)
The future of immigration reform is up in the air, now that the current legislation has stalled in Congress. Many lawmakers are still vowing to keep the issue alive. It's an issue being closely watched here in the Northwest, particularly by the high-tech and farming industries. One of the people speaking up for the regions orchardists has seen his personal view in immigration flip 180 degrees. KPLU's Tom Banse has this profile.


Indians Back a Monument to Spanish Settlers at Neah Bay (2007-06-08)
Here's a bit of Northwest history you don't hear much about. In 1790, Spanish explorers took possession of Neah Bay from the Makah Indians. Now, 200 years later, wounds have healed and a monument to Spanish settlement in the Northwest is almost complete. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Food For Thought: Food Memoirs (2007-06-07)
The next best thing to cooking great food or eating great food is READING about great food! At least, according to Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson. She talks with KPLU's Dick Stein about her favorite food memoirs on today's Food for Thought.


Life Insurance (2007-06-07)
Are you confused by life insurance? You're not alone. KPLU's Dave Meyer reviews the different kinds of life insurance with financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Parking Lawsuit (2007-06-07)
If you parked in downtown Seattle on a holiday and got a ticket, you may be in for a refund. In a class action lawsuit, a judge has ruled the city violated its own ordinance by giving out tickets on holidays. More from KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel


Washington Governor Goes North to Alaska (2007-06-07)
Not since Dixy Lee Ray in the 1970s has a Washington Governor made an official visit to Alaska. Current Governor Chris Gregoire has just returned from a short trip up north. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


No Welcome Mat for Canadian Dairy Cows? (2007-06-07)
Snow melt and heavy rains have swollen British Columbia's Fraser River to the highest levels in 35 years. Several thousand cows may need to be evacuated from low-lying farms upriver from Vancouver. As KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains, they could be coming to Washington State


Seattle Loses Parking Suit (2007-06-07)
The city of Seattle illegally ticketed thousands of people who parked downtown a holiday. A Superior Court judge has ruled the city failed to follow its own ordinance. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


Scarce Candidates in King County Elections (2007-06-07)
Tomorrow (Friday) marks the end of King County Elections' filing week - anyone who wants to run for office must submit their declaration and filing fee by 4:30 in the afternoon. It's an earlier deadline than in years past because of the August primary - and the elections office is concerned that many races still don't have candidates. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:55)


SAFECO Offers New Way for Parents to Track Teen Drivers (2007-06-06)
If you're an anxious parent of a teenage driver, a Northwest insurance company has something to sell you. It's a G-P-S system that allows parents to keep tabs when their kid is behind the wheel.


Cattlemen Wary of Helping Canadian Dairy Farmers (2007-06-06)
There have been stiff restrictions on bringing cattle from Canada into the U.S. since the mad cow scare several years ago. Talk of relaxing those rules because of the threat of floods in British Columbia is making Washington cattlemen nervous. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Immigrant Rights Advocates Upset over Shelton Raid (2007-06-05)
Immigrant rights advocates are upset about a raid in Shelton late last week. Federal agents were looking for four fugitives, but ended up arresting a total of sixteen people. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


SeaTac Forum on College Grants (2007-06-05)
For many poor families, the cost of higher education can often seem out-of-reach. But new federal programs may be able to help this year's graduates pay for college . KPLU education reporter Gary Davis explains.


Flooding May Send Canadian Cows to Washington (2007-06-05)
The threat of floods in British Columbia may lead to relaxing an import ban on Canadian cows that's been in place since the mad cow scare of 2003. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Domestic Violence Legal Help (2007-06-05)
Victims of domestic violence will get extra legal help in Seattle. The city plans to provide attorneys for some people trying to escape abusive spouses. More from KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel.


Signs of Change at Gas Stations (2007-06-05)
Call it a sign of the times. Gas station operators are getting sick of running outside all the time to change the numbers on those towering price signs. It's time consuming, even dangerous. And being slow to match the latest price move can cost a gas station big. So the switch is on to electronic signs. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has more.


Qwest Field Neighborhood Headed for Approval (2007-06-04)
After nearly six years of deal making, it looks like a new multi-use housing development will be built where the old Kingdome used to stand. The King County Council considers a purchase and sale agreement for the property today (Monday 6/4/07.) More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:09)


Gates mega-donation funds UW health institute (2007-06-04)
A huge donation to the University of Washington is helping solidify Seattle's position as a mecca for global health research. The grant comes from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. More from KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld:


Gates and UW Form New Health Institute (2007-06-04)
The University of Washington is getting the largest private gift in the school's history. It's coming from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to create a new institute related to global health. More from KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld.


Early Sign-up to Run for Office (2007-06-04)
Ambitious men and women looking for fame, or to make a difference, can take an important step this week. It's filing week for Washington State and local elections. This is the first time candidates have filed in June instead of July. KPLU's Keith Seinfeld explains.


Obama in Seattle (2007-06-02)
Democratic Senator Barack Obama brought his campaign for President to Seattle Friday. KPLU's Paula Wissel was there.


The Life Vest's Struggle to Win Hearts and Minds (2007-06-01)
For every season, there's the story. The one you hear every year. At Thanksgiving it's about shopping. Now that the weather is heating up, it's about the drowning victim who wasn't wearing a life vest. We all know personal flotation devices save lives. So why do so many of us still refuse to wear them? KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson went to a busy boat launch in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, to ask around.


Thiel on Bennett's Tough Talk (2007-06-01)
Sonics owner Clay Bennett said this week that he's losing hope for a new arena that would keep the Sonics and Storm in the Seattle area. Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel joined KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick by phone to talk about the latest salvo in this ongoing saga, and why he feels the bigger problem lies with the N-B-A itself.


Wanted: Troopers to Join Northwest Police Departments (2007-06-01)
If you've ever thought about a career in law enforcement, now's your chance. State Police Departments in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho are looking for more than a few good men and women. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Campaign Promotes Hands-on Puget Sound Cleanup (2007-06-01)
Washington's ambitious plan to clean up Puget Sound by 20-0 is slowly getting off the ground. The state is recruiting board members and staff for a new agency. In the mean time, several conservation groups are urging everyday people to get out in the mud to save Puget Sound. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Technology Alliance Wants More Math in Schools (2007-06-01)
Proficiency in math and science opens doors for students and feeds the economy with a better workforce. That's according to the Technology Alliance, which is pushing for more requirements and tougher standards. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:01)


Remote Control Shusher Introduced in Northwest Cineplexes (2007-06-01)
Call it a welcome innovation in remote control. Moviegoers at some Northwest cineplexes can now press a button to stop rude behavior by other patrons like yakking on cell phones. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Makah Tribal Hunters Celebrate Renewed Whaling Quota (2007-05-31)
The Makah tribe on the Pacific coast has received international approval to hunt gray whales for another five years. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


May is Deadliest Month at Fort Lewis Since War Started (2007-05-31)
The month of May will go down as the deadliest yet for soldiers based at Fort Lewis. So far, nineteen Fort Lewis soldiers have died this month in Iraq. Base commanders now say they can no longer continue to hold individual memorial services. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more.


Right to Divorce Lawyer (2007-05-31)
A woman in Snohomish County who lost primary custody of her children in a divorce is arguing her rights were violated. Brenda King says she was at a disadvantage in court because she couldn't afford an attorney. It's a case the state Supreme Court is taking up this morning. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel tells us more.


Mud Up! (2007-05-31)
If getting dirty cleaning up Puget Sound is your idea of a good time, the new Mud Up! campaign is looking for you. It's all part of the effort to restore the Sound by 2020. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Right to Attorney (2007-05-31)
Someone accused of a crime has a right to an attorney. But should someone going through a divorce and custody battle also be guaranteed a lawyer? That's the question before the state Supreme Court on Thursday. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


Cabaret Meets Art School at Dr. Sketchy (2007-05-31)
The world of art can be a serious one. Recently, many young artists have been asking why can't art also be fun? Those questions have inspired a new anti-art school event called Dr. Sketchy. Life drawing models are replaced by burlesque dancers and the classroom is a bar. As KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports, Dr. Sketchy has arrived in Seattle.


Seattle OK's Math Standards (2007-05-31)
One of the hottest debates in education these days is on mathematics. Students across the state have received poor math scores on the WASL. The state Board of Education is trying to come up with curriculum standards to improve those scores. But some districts aren't waiting for the state's recommendations. Last night Seattle approved new elementary school math standards. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis was there for the vote.


When To Sell? (2007-05-31)
The stock market has been hitting new highs and you may be tempted to take a profit. But how do you know when to sell? KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Math Standards for Seattle K-5 Kids (2007-05-30)
One of the hottest debates in education these days is on mathematics. Students across the state have received poor math scores on the WASL. The state Board of Education is trying to come up with curriculum standards to improve those scores. But some districts aren't waiting for the state's recommendations. On Wednesday Seattle approved new elementary school math standards. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis was there for the vote.


Family Revives Ellis Island of the Columbia River (2007-05-30)
Who knew the Northwest had its own Ellis Island ? Nearly 100,000 immigrants passed through the port of entry at Astoria between 1899 and 1938. The U.S. Quarantine Station on the Washington side of the river is now in private hands. The family owners say their nearly forgotten slice of immigration history can shed light on our current immigration debate. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from the mouth of the Columbia river.


Feds to Crack Down on Illegal Immigrants in Northwest (2007-05-30)
Washington, D.C. is sending more federal immigration agents to the Northwest. Their job: to deport illegal immigrants who've had a run-in with the law. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Nancy's Return to Jersey (2007-05-30)
Who says you can't go home? Seattle Times Restaurant Critic Nancy Leson recently returned to her old stompin' grounds on the East Coast. Her trip was filled with food AND food-filled memories! She tells KPLU's Dick Stein about it on today's Food for Thought .


New 4-Year Degree for NW Indian College (2007-05-29)
Western Washington has its first four-year college for Native Americans. Northwest Indian College near Bellingham has offered associates degrees, but will soon offer its first bachelor's program. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis has more.


School Assignment Changes Coming (2007-05-29)
The US Supreme Court is expected to rule on a case involving the Seattle School District any time now. The case concerns the district's former practice of considering a student's race when assigning them to a school. It stopped the practice when the legal troubles began. But the impending court decision is prompting action on a new assignment plan.


Northwesterners Want to Juice Plug-in Cars (2007-05-29)
How would you like to fuel up for 75 cents per gallon? Engineers estimate it might even cost less than that to fuel a hybrid electric car with cheap Northwest hydropower. A coalition of utilities and local governments hopes the Northwest can become a development hub for such plug-in cars.


Maleng Interim Replacement (2007-05-29)
A man who says Norm Maleng was like a father to him has been appointed acting prosecuting attorney in King County. Dan Satterberg was Maleng's chief of staff. Maleng, who died last week of a heart attack, had held the office since 1978. More from KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel.


Student Assignment Changes for Seattle (2007-05-29)
The U-S Supreme Court is expected to rule on a case involving the Seattle School District any time now. The case concerns the district's former practice of considering a student's race when assigning them to a school. It stopped the practice when the legal troubles began. But the impending court decision is prompting action on a new assignment plan. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis explains.


Battling the NW's High Rate of Whooping Cough (2007-05-29)
Bet you didn't know the Northwest is a hot spot for whooping cough. That's a severe, chronic cough that can cause death in infants. To combat the disease, health officials say eleven and twelve year olds should get a booster shot.


Big Gang Bust in Seattle (2007-05-25)
Seattle's Central District will be safer now. That's according to law enforcement officials, who have wrapped up a six-month investigation and completed a big gang bust. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:05)


Thiel on Sonics Draft Lottery (2007-05-25)
The Sonics are poised to make a major improvement to their team next month by selecting second in the NBA Draft. The Sonics had the luck of the draw in the lottery this week. But will their luck soon run out when it comes to finding a way to stay in the area? KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about that.


Thiel on Sonics Draft Lottery (2007-05-25)
The Sonics are poised to make a major improvement to their team next month by selecting second in the NBA Draft. The Sonics had the luck of the draw in the lottery this week. But will their luck soon run out when it comes to finding a way to stay in the area? KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about that.


Judge Says ELF Arsons Are Domestic Terrorism (2007-05-25)
A federal judge in Eugene ruled the label of domestic terrorism does apply to some arsons carried out by a former member of the earth liberation front. The terrorism designation increased Stanislas Meyerhoff's sentence to 13 years in prison, as KLCC's Ann Dornfeld reports.


Roller Derby Revival (2007-05-25)
Roller derby is experiencing a revival across the nation - and especially in Seattle. About three years ago, a handful of women founded a new league here. Now, the Rat City Roller Girls are ranked first in the nation. They skate a mid-season bout this weekend, which is expected to attract thousands of fans. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp went to find out what all the fuss is about.


Controversy Over Heat Stress Rule (2007-05-25)
Just in time for summer ... Washington State is set to impose emergency regulations to protect workers from heat stress. The state says the new rules are needed to protect farmworkers and others who labor outdoors. Critics say it's just more government red tape.


Transit Funding Gets Nod (2007-05-25)
If you live in the central Puget Sound area, you're a step closer to voting on the most ambitious transit expansion in state history.


Thiel on Sonics Draft Lottery (2007-05-25)
The Sonics are poised to make a major improvement to their team next month by selecting second in the NBA Draft. The Sonics had the luck of the draw in the lottery this week. But will their luck soon run out when it comes to finding a way to stay in the area? KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about that.


ATF Violent Gang Task Force Arrests 47 in Seattle (2007-05-25)
A violent gang task force has announced the arrest of 47 suspects in Seattle's central district. It was the culmination of a six-month investigation by federal and local officials. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:56)


Sentencing Begins for Eco-Saboteurs (2007-05-24)
The sentencing hearing began for the first of ten radical environmentalists convicted in a series of arsons in Western states between 1998 and 2001. The government is asking the federal judge to classify the defendants as domestic terrorists, which could extend their sentences and land them in higher-security prisons.


Private Equity (2007-05-24)
What happens when a public firm turns private? KPLU's Dave Meyer explores the world of private equity with financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Bigger is Better for Northwest Homeowners (2007-05-24)
Bigger is better it seems as far as Northwest home owners are concerned. KPLU's Tom Banse has some revealing numbers from the Census Bureau.


Taking Another Look at Surface-Transit (2007-05-24)
There's been a change in state law - and a change in attitude among state transportation officials. That could be good news for people who want to replace Seattle's Alaskan Way viaduct with a greener option. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story


Spirit of the International District (2007-05-24)
Visit Seattle's International District, stand on one side of the street, look back at the busy street-level shops, and then look up. You'll see old hotels that once housed thousands of Asian immigrants. That's what Seattle University professor Marie Wong does with her students of urban history. Wong says the old buildings reveal this community's unique spirit. KPLU's Gary Davis joined her tour of the old Milwaukee Hotel for this audio postcard.


Transit Funding To Go To Voters (2007-05-24)
If you live in the central Puget Sound area, you're a step closer to voting on the most ambitious transit expansion in state history. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


WA Rolls Out Welcome Mat to Farmworkers (2007-05-24)
The State of Washington has produced a new video to lure farmworkers to the Northwest. It's part of an effort by the state to address a farmworker shortage. But is the video an invitation to illegal immigrants?


Food for Thought Q&A: Culture (2007-05-23)
Tis the season for Famers' Markets - as Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein on Today's Food for Thought.


Defining Disability (2007-05-23)
Carpal tunnel syndrome and progressive diseases such as MS don't qualify as disabilities under federal law. But they'll soon count as disabilities under federal law. But they'll soon count as disabilities in Washington.


Cervical Cancer vaccine (2007-05-23)
The HPV vaccine is here and it's free. That's the controversial vaccine for young girls to prevent them from getting a sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer. The Washington State Health Department is providing the human papillomavirus vaccine. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports.


Orca Death Mystery (2007-05-23)
Whale researchers are puzzling over a grisly find along the Washington coast: the dorsal fin and part of the back of an orca whale washed up on the beach. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Gang Problem Plagues Rural Northwest (2007-05-23)
Police across the Northwest are noticing a disturbing trend. Violent gang activity is on the rise once again. And it's not just in big cities. In fact one epicenter of the problem appears to be Washington's Yakima County. That's farm country. In the town of Sunnyside, city leaders this week passed a controversial ordinance that makes gang membership illegal. Other towns may soon follow suit.


Hike in Community College Tuition (2007-05-23)
Tuition is going up at the state's community colleges. Yesterday the board that regulates the two-year schools and technical colleges approved a two-percent increase. As KPLU education reporter Gary Davis explains, the tuition increase is far less than in recent years.


Community College Tuition Rises (2007-05-23)
Tuition is going up at the state's community colleges. Yesterday the board that regulates the two-year schools and technical colleges approved a two-percent increase. As KPLU education reporter Gary Davis explains, the tuition increase is far less than in recent years.


Community College Tuition Rises (2007-05-23)
Tuition is going up at the state's community colleges. Yesterday the board that regulates the two-year schools and technical colleges approved a two-percent increase. As KPLU education reporter Gary Davis explains, the tuition increase is far less than in recent years.


Redefining disability (2007-05-23)
Carpal tunnel syndrome and a lot of progressive diseases such as M.S. don't qualify as disabilities under federal law. But they'll soon count as disabilities in Washington. KPLU Law and Justice reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


Preventing Cervical Cancer (2007-05-23)
A new vaccine could dramatically reduce a girl's chances of dying of cancer when she grows up. The state is providing it for free. It prevents a sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer. KPLU's Paula Wissel has the story.


Pedestrian Safety (2007-05-22)
When drivers and pedestrians intersect it's not always clear who should move - when and where. The Seattle City Council will hold a special meeting on its Pedestrian Master Plan this week. One goal is to make clear the rules of intersections.


Review and Remembrance of Michael Brecker (2007-05-22)
Tenor saxophonist Michael Brecker has been called the most influential sax player since Wayne Shorter and John Coltrane. He's also provided inspiration for thousands of young musicians around the world. He died in January of Leukemia, but a new album of his final recordings is being released in stores today (Tuesday).


Electric Bills to Rise for Millions (2007-05-22)
You may be in for an unexpected rate increase if your electricity comes through a private power company. That covers about three-fifths (60%) of the Northwest population.


Moscow Shooter Update (2007-05-22)
A memorial service has been scheduled for 1pm Friday afternoon at the Kibbie Dome at the University of Idaho in Moscow. The service is to honor those fallen in the weekend shooting deaths in Moscow. As time moves on, the impacted families and the community are trying to heal and are looking for answers.


Moscow Shooter Had History of Violence (2007-05-22)
The man identified as the gunman in the weekend shootings in Moscow, Idaho had a history of violence with the Moscow Police Department and the Latah County Sheriff's Office.


More farmers planting organic (2007-05-21)
Farmers in Washington are planting more organic crops. In fact, the growth is so fast, there's fear they may end up with a sudden price crash. More from KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld:


Sound and Vision (2007-05-21)
Seattle's Experience Music Project and the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame share the same building. Now... they're sharing an exhibit. Both museums are collecting oral histories. They've combined them into a new permanent collection called "Sound and Vision: Artists Tell Their Stories". KPLU's Dave Meyer checked it out.


Moscow Shooting (2007-05-21)
Three people, including a city police officer and a Presbyterian Church sexton, were killed and two other people were wounded in an overnight weekend shooting near the Latah County Courthouse in Moscow, ID.


Fishery Observers Meet In Vancouver (2007-05-21)
When fishing fleets go to sea, more and more often they have observers on board who keep track of what they catch. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty spoke with an organizer of a conference in Vancouver B.C. that aims to put more observers on the water


Moscow Shooter (2007-05-21)
Local police say the gunman involved in shooting deaths this weekend in Moscow, Idaho was suicidal and had said that if he was going to kill himself, he would take a lot of people with him.


Moscow Shooter - Update (2007-05-21)
The wife of the gunman responsible for the deaths of at least three people and the wounding of two others was found dead inside the couple's home on Sunday.


Graduation Rates Site Launched (2007-05-21)
You'd think it would be easy for school districts to report accurate graduation rates. But that's not necessarily true. Researchers discovered it's hard to get good information. So they've put together a website they say contains the real numbers. And they give high marks to Washington State's reporting efforts. KPLU s Gary Davis explains.


Microsoft Buying Seattle's aQuantive for $ 6B Cash (2007-05-19)
Microsoft is pulling no punches to get into the online ad business. It's paying six billion (b) dollars cash to buy Seattle-based aQuantive. The deal is the biggest acquisition in Microsoft's history. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:12)


Thiel on NBA Suspension (2007-05-18)
The already-heated NBA playoff series between the San Antonio Spurs and the Phoenix Suns got a little hotter this week. In Game Four on Monday night, a flagrant foul resulted in two of the Suns' star players being suspended for a game. They weren't in the game at the time or involved in a fight. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about that.


New Seattle Schools Leader Visits (2007-05-18)
Seattle schools new superintendent is in town, getting to know the city and her new district. At district headquarters last night, Dr. Maria Goodloe-Johnson received an earful of welcoming advice. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis was there, and has our report.


A First in Decades: Washington Loses a School District (2007-05-18)
It's been at least a quarter of a century since a school district in Washington ceased to exist. But it's about to happen in the town of Vader, Washington in the Southwest corner of the state. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Voter Tracking (2007-05-18)
King County voters may soon be able to go online and track their ballots, from their mailboxes to the elections office. The Department of Elections is reccomending purchasing technology to promote better voter accountability. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Inside the Volcano: Slow Brewing Mystery Stew (2007-05-18)
May 18th is a big anniversary date in the Northwest. It's the day Mount St. Helens blew its top 27 years ago. There hasn't been a towering steam and ash plume from the volcano in well over a year now. But the lava dome in the crater continues to grow slowly and steadily. Nobody knows how long this phase of the eruption will last. KPLU's Tom Banse reports Mount St. Helens presents something of a scientific puzzle.


Microsoft's Biggest Buy: Online Ad Company aQuantive (2007-05-18)
Microsoft has announced the largest acquisition in its history. It's buying Seattle-based online advertising giant aQuantive for six (b) billion dollars cash. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:04)


WA to Begin Monitoring Air for Pesticides (2007-05-17)
Kids growing up near farms may not breathe urban smog. But they are often exposed to pesticides. And that's a potential health concern. In Washington, the state will soon begin monitoring what's known as pesticide drift. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Bus Expansion (2007-05-17)
Metro riders can soon expect shorter waits, quieter rides and a good shot at getting a seat of their own. That's according to King County executive Ron Sims. He's announced what he calls "one of the biggest bus service expansions in Metro histroy." KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Global Warming Impacts on Columbia Basin (2007-05-17)
Global warming will make life harder for the Northwest's already-stressed salmon stocks in the coming decades. And that could mean tough choices for managers of the Columbia Basin hydroelectric system. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


500 New Buses (2007-05-17)
500 brand new buses will take to King County streets over the next five years. The County has announced a major expansion of Metro Transit. Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Ports to Cut Air Pollution (2007-05-17)
The region's maritime industry is a major contributor to air pllution. Now, the Ports of Seattle, Tacoma, and Vancouver BC have pledged to drastically cut their emissions from ships and heavy equipment. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Parents hesitant, immunization rate is low (2007-05-16)
By the time toddlers reach age three, they're supposed to have had 15 shots -- protecting them from diseases such as measles and chicken pox. Many parents in Washington are hesitant to give so many vaccinations to a small child. More from KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld:


Paul Hawken Interview (2007-05-16)
Paul Hawken is an entrepreneur, activist, and author. His influential books envision a greener, more socially-conscious way of doing business. Hawken's newest book is called "Blessed Unrest: How the Largest Movement in the World Came Into Being and Why No One Saw It Coming." In it, he sescribes a global explosion of local grass-roots groups tackling everthing from poverty to pollution. Hawken recently spoke with KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Eco-Saboteurs Fight "Terrorism" Label (2007-05-16)
Are they mere arsonists or are they terrorists? That's what a federal judge in Eugene is mulling over today as it pertains to a group of radical environmentalists. The judge is preparing to sentence ten people for their roles in a long spree of firebombings across the Northwest. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from Eugene on arguments over what exactly constitutes "terrorism" in this day and age.


Blessed Unrest: A Conversation with Paul Hawken (2007-05-16)
Paul Hawken is an entrepreneur, activist, and author. His influential books envision a greener, more socially-conscious way of doing business. Hawken's newest book is called "Blessed Unrest: How the Largest Movement in the World Came Into Being and Why No One Saw It Coming." In it, he sescribes a global explosion of local grass-roots groups tackling everthing from poverty to pollution. Hawken recently spoke with KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Ports to Cut Air Pollution (2007-05-16)
The region's maritime industry is a major contributor to air pollution. Now, the Ports of Seattle, Tacoma and Vancouver B.C. have pledged to drastically cut their emissions from ships and heavy equipment. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Food For Thought: Oldies but Goodies (2007-05-16)
On today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein about some of her favorite oldies but goodies.


Amazon.com Entering Digital Music Business (2007-05-16)
Amazon dot com is going head to head with Apple's iTunes. Seattle's Internet retailer has announced it's entering the digital music business. It will sell files without copy protection. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:52)


Microsoft CEO Summit Attracts Top Execs (2007-05-16)
It's the ultimate in corporate networking. More than a hundred business leaders from around the world have gathered in Redmond for Microsoft's annual CEO Summit. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:13)


Ft Lewis Remembers Six Soldiers Killed by Roadside Bombs (2007-05-16)
Six soldiers killed by a roadside bomb in Iraq were remembered yesterday at Fort Lewis Army Base. The May 6th attack on a Stryker vehicle was the single deadliest incident involving Fort Lewis soldiers since a suicide bombing in 2004. KPLU's Austin Jenkins attended the memorial service and has this report.


Immunizations and hesitant parents (2007-05-15)
It's the public health version of being a draft-dodger. The Seattle area is considered a hotspot for vaccine hesitancy -- parents who delay getting their babies and toddlers immunized. As KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld explains, no one knows exactly why:


WA DNR to Forest Owners: Cut Down Those Sick Trees (2007-05-15)
An epidemic is sweeping the Northwest. Budworm and Bark Beetle are infesting hundreds of thousands of acres of forestland. Now, Washington is about to get tough on private timber companies that ignore the problem. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains.


Former Reporter Turned Foster Care Advocate Sues State (2007-05-15)
A former journalist turned state worker is suing the state. Bob Partlow says he was retaliated against after he lambasted the state's child welfare system in a speech two years ago. Partlow is asking for $1.5 million in damages. But he claims it's not about the money, it's about saving kids' lives. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


New Math Standards For Seattle? (2007-05-15)
As kids in the state struggle with low math scores, districts are trying to figure out the best ways to quickly improve results. In Seattle, leaders say they have a new plan for elementary students. More from KPLU education reporter Gary Davis.


Cruise Ship Passengers Safely Ashore (2007-05-14)
All 248 passengers of the cruise ship Empress of the North are safely back on shore. The vessel hit a rock and took on water in Southeast Alaska last night. KPLU's Liam Moriarty has this update


Cruise Ship Had Previous Problems (2007-05-14)
The grounding of a ship from a Seattle-based cruise line ended happily. The passengers got safely ashore, no one got hurt and no oil was spilled into the Alaskan waters. As KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports, the Empress of the North has had more than its share of troubles since it was launched just four years ago.


Fattened Sea Lions (2007-05-14)
The voracious sea lions camped out below Bonneville Dam have started to migrate back to sea. But not before extracting the heaviest toll yet observed on the spring salmon run up the Columbia and Snake Rivers.


Western State Satellite (2007-05-14)
Western State Hospital is opening up a satellite office in Seattle. The goal is to more efficiently determine if people charged with crimes are competent to stand trial. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel explains.


Ethics and children with disabilities (2007-05-14)
When doctors in Seattle agreed to limit the growth of a severely disabled girl, they set off a storm of controversy. Now Seattle Children's Hospital is teaming up with the University of Washington Law School and Disability Studies Program, to host a national forum on the ethics of such treatments. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld has more:


Tacoma Superintendent To Get Review (2007-05-12)
Controversy over the performance of Tacoma's embattled school superintendent has taken a new twist. The school board has decided to give Charles Milligan a more thorough job review. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis explains.


Report Questions Hanford Vit Plant Operating System (2007-05-11)
You know how your computer has an operating system? Well, so do nuclear waste treatment plants. Now a government inspector is questioning the operating system for the new Vitrification plant at Hanford. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Millions Spent on WA Train Yard, But No Trains Stop (2007-05-11)
You know the saying: if you build it they will come? Well, what happens if you build it with taxpayer money and they don't come? That's what's happened in the central Washington town of Quincy. Several million dollars were spent to build a railroad terminal to get goods to market. But so far no trains are stopping at the station. We sent KPLU's Austin Jenkins to find out if this is a taxpayer boondoggle in the desert?


Thiel on Mora Back in Seattle (2007-05-11)
The Seahawks have hired former Atlanta Falcons head coach Jim Mora to be their assistant head coach. Mora grew up in the Seattle-area, and just might grow into the job of Seahawks head coach. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Seattle P-I sports columnist Art Thiel about that.


Tacoma Gets Nation's Intermodal Radiation Detection Center (2007-05-11)
The Port of Tacoma has won a dubious honor. It's been selected by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to test new methods to inspect cargo shipments for radiation. That's because more unscreened shipments pass through Tacoma than any other port in the country. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp reports. (1:02)


Court Upholds Police Ruse to Collect DNA (2007-05-11)
It's okay for police to trick suspects into giving a DNA sample. That's the ruling yesterday from the Washington Supreme Court. The six-three ruling came in the case of a convicted child murderer. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Sanctuary Call for Immigrants (2007-05-10)
Local religious leaders are calling on area churches to provide sanctuary for immigrants whose families - they say - are being torn apart by current immigration laws. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Coalition Advocates Sanctuary for Immigrants (2007-05-10)
Local religious leaders are calling on area churches to provide sanctuary for immirgants whose families, they say, are being torn apart by current immigration laws. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Choosing the Right IRA (2007-05-10)
If you've received a tax return in recent weeks, you may be wondering what to do with the extra cash. Conventional wisdom is to put it into an individual retirement fund, or IRA - but what kind? Bellamy Pailthorp spoke with KPLU financial commentator, Greg Heberlein. (3:31)


Green Group Sues to Tighten Rules on Cruise Ship Pollution (2007-05-10)
It's anchors aweigh for the Alaska cruise season. And in sails a lawsuit to get tougher limits on cruise ship pollution. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Fired U.S. Attorneys Speak Out (2007-05-10)
Former U-S Attorney John McKay is now blaming the White House for his dismissal. McKay and several other fired U-S Attorneys spoke out at a legal forum at Seattle University. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel was there.


Coal Plant Delayed by New Global Warming Law (2007-05-10)
It's been barely a week since the Governor signed Washington's new global warming law. But already it's being blamed for slowing down development of a proposed power plant. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Global Warming Law Delays New Power Plant (2007-05-10)
It's been barely a week since the Governor signed Washington's new global warming law. But already it's being blamed for slowing down development of a proposed power plant. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Tacoma Port to Test DHS Cargo Detection Systems (2007-05-10)
The Port of Tacoma has been selected as a test site for a new Department of Homeland Security program to screen rail cargo for radiation. Systems developed in Tacoma are to serve as a model for the rest of the country. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:03)


Drug Company Settles (2007-05-09)
A drug company that makes a highly addictive pain killer has agreed to pay nineteen million dollars in a settlement. Washington and other states had sued the makers of OxyContin over how the drug was marketed. KPLU's Paula Wissel has the story.


OxyContin Settles Lawsuit (2007-05-09)
The maker of a painkiller that is widely sold as a street drug has agreed to pay millions to settle a lawsuit over its aggressive marketing practices. Purdue Pharma manufactures the drug OxyContin. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, Washington was one of dozens of states suing the company.


Drug Settlement (2007-05-09)
A drug company that makes a highly addictive pain killer has agreed to pay nineteen million dollars in a settlement. Washington and other states had sued the makers of OxyContin over how the drug was marketed. KPLU's Paula Wissel has the story.


Protests and WASL Reforms Mark National Teacher Day (2007-05-09)
So much for shiny, red apples. National Teacher Day took-on a hard edge yesterday in Olympia. The teachers' union rallied against the Superintendent of Public Instruction. And the Governor signed a controversial testing reform bill. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Fishermen's Disaster Funds Vetoed (2007-05-09)
When President Bush vetoed the spending bill that would have funded the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Pacific coast fishermen ended up as collateral damage. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Food For Thought: Kids on Food (2007-05-09)
Mother's Day is this sunday, and leading up to that special day, KPLU's food commentator Nancy Leson couldn't think of anything sweeter than having her son, Nate, join her in the studio to talk about food. Not surprisingly, the apple doesn't fall too far from this food critic's tree.


OxyContin Marketing (2007-05-09)
The maker of a painkiller that is widely sold as a street drug has agreed to pay millions to settle a lawsuit over its aggressive marketing practices. Purdue Pharma manufactures the drug OxyContin. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, Washington was one of dozens of states suing the company.


OxyContin Marketing (2007-05-09)
The maker of a painkiller that is widely sold as a street drug has agreed to pay million to settle a lawsuit over its aggressive marketing practices. Purdue Pharma manufactures the drug OxyContin. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, Washington was one of dozens of states suing the company.


OxyContin Settles Lawsuit (2007-05-09)
The maker of a painkiller that is widely sold as a street drug has agreed to pay millions to settle a lawsuit over its aggressive marketing practices. Purdue Pharma manufactures the drug OxyContin. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, Washington was one of dozens of states suing the company


Clearwire Corp. Optimistic Despite Losses (2007-05-09)
Cell phone pioneer Craig McCaw's latest venture continues to lose money at a rapid clip. Kirkland-based wireless Internet provider Clearwire reports it lost more than ninety two million (m) dollars in its first quarter since going public in March. Its executives insist the company is on track. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (0:54)


New Sanctuary Movement (2007-05-09)
People of faith need to take a stand and help the nation's undocumented immigrants. That's the message from a coalition of churches in Seattle. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Food For Thought - Mother's Day (2007-05-09)
Nancy Leson's Food for Thought focuses on Mother's Day for this weeks edition.


Endangered Species Protection for Steelhead Trout (2007-05-08)
The last time federal fisheries managers looked at how Puget Sound steelhead trout were doing, they decided the fish didn't need protection. Now - a decade later - they've changed their minds. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains


Slower Sales, Higher Prices for Region's Housing (2007-05-08)
The housing market is starting to slow a bit in Western Washington. But a strong job market has kept prices rising. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:16)


Coastal Fishermen Hit by Iraq War Veto (2007-05-08)
Fishing-dependent communities along the Pacific Coast have become casualties in the battle of wills between Congress and the president over funding the war in Iraq. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Infants watching TV, videos (2007-05-08)
Babies and toddlers are watching more T-V than you might imagine. And the top reason is: their parents think it's good for them. Doctors say it isn't. KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld explains:


Foster Kids No Longer Shown Door at 18 (2007-05-07)
Would you show your child the door at age 18? Traditionally that's what happens to foster kids in Washington. But now that's changing. Several laws have passed in recent years help ease the transition from foster child to grown-up. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


"Full Employment" Gutting Worksource Centers (2007-05-07)
Washington's economy has been fairing well, with unemployment at a rate slightly lower than the national level of four and half percent. But what's good news for most people is bad news for those left seeking work; and for agencies that serve them. More from KPLU's business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Parents mistakenly believe videos are educational (2007-05-07)
A message for parents of babies and toddlers: Ignore the marketing. Huge numbers of very young children are watching television or videos because their parents mistakenly believe it's educational. More from KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld:


Out of State Gay Political Donors Targeted NW Legislative Races (2007-05-07)
A network of wealthy, out-of-state gay rights advocates targeted legislative races in Washington and Oregon last year. In Washington, it appears they poured more than 25-thousand dollars into six swing district races. This coordinated effort went undetected until now - six months after the election. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this report.


Puget Sound Steelhead Declared Threatened (2007-05-07)
Puget Sound's steelhead trout are swimming toward extinction. That's the word from federal fisheries managers. They've declared the fish threatened under the Endangered Species Act. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Housing Market Slower, But Healthy (2007-05-07)
Housing prices continue to rise throughout Western Washington, offsetting any worry about a slight slowing of the market. Realtors are calling the picture painted by the latest sales figures healthy - especially as compared to the rest of the country. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:07)


Full Employment Gutting Worksource Centers (2007-05-07)
Washington's economy has been faring well - with unemployment at a rate slightly lower than the national level of four and a half percent. But what's good news for most people is bad news for those left seeking work - and for the agencies that serve them. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:04)


Talkin' Biodiesel in Seattle (2007-05-04)
It seems as though suddenly, big money and big-time political clout is lining up behind biodiesel fuel in the Northwest. This weekend, a grass-roots group that was doing biodiesel before it was cool is hosting a forum in Seattle. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Autism and Brain Development (2007-05-04)
Autism is getting a lot of attention from researchers these days. It seems to be on the increase, while it also remains mysterious. Scientists are in Seattle for an international conference on autism. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld has this update.


Aquifers Tried for Drinking Water Storage (2007-05-04)
Federal Way will be the scene for the region's biggest experiment yet in using deep aquifers to store drinking water. This is an idea that Walla Walla, Salem, Beaverton, and pioneered. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


War Protestors Plan New Port Protest (2007-05-04)
First it was the Port of Olympia. Then the Port of Tacoma. Now Washington war protestors are shifting their focus to the Port of Grays Harbor. That's where the next Iraq-bound military shipment is expected to depart from. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Cormorants May Get Moving Orders (2007-05-04)
A grand experiment in wildlife management is underway at the mouth of the Columbia River. Thousands of Caspian terns await orders to move south where they'll hopefully lay off endangered salmon. But the vulnerable salmon can't seem to catch a break. Cormorants are moving into the river mouth. The cormorants may also get moving papers if their numbers keep growing. KPLU's Tom Banse paid a visit to the island at the center of the action.


Rail Stowaways Nabbed at Border (2007-05-04)
Twice over the past week, customs and border patrol agents at the Canadian border nabbed stowaways on incoming freight trains. KPLU's Tom Banse has details on the high tech gizmo used to catch them.


Talks of Microsoft-Yahoo Deal (2007-05-04)
The business world is abuzz with rumors that Microsoft is resuming its efforts to buy search engine operator Yahoo. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:11)


Thiel on 2007 Seahawks Season (2007-05-04)
The Seahawks have some new players for next season after the recent N-F-L Draft. How much will they help the team? KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with sports columnist Art Thiel of the Seattle P-I about the outlook for 2007.


Starbucks Resolving Trademark Dispute with Ethiopia (2007-05-03)
Starbucks says it has concluded two days of positive discussions with the government of Ethiopia. Both parties have pledged to sign a licensing agreement this month that recognizes the importance and integrity of Ethiopia's specialty coffee names. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:09)


Tacoma Event Backs Education (2007-05-03)
Tacoma's leaders are worried about what poverty is doing to the city's youth. A workshop this weekend is aimed at finding ways to better support Tacoma's kids. More from KPLU education reporter Gary Davis.


Moms of Multiples Converge (2007-05-03)
It used to be that twins were rare. Triplets even more so. But over the last 25 years, the rate of twin births is up almost 70-percent. Behind all those babies are mothers who know first-hand what it means to get more than what you bargained for. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson recently spent time in Bellingham with a group of women who share the singular experience of raising multiples.


Are Bad Times Ahead? (2007-05-03)
The Dow Jones Industrial Average is in record territory. US investors are buying more foreign stocks than ever before. And some analysts are worried about an economic downturn. What's it all mean? KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Nutrition labels on restaurant menus (2007-05-02)
We're eating more meals away from home than ever before. So, targeting restaurant menus might be a way to combat obesity. A committee meets Wednesday afternoon in Seattle to craft new rules for King County restaurants. KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld explains: (1:14)


Rescue Tug Loses Funding Till Winter (2007-05-02)
Thursday is the last day the state's rescue tug boat will be on duty at Neah Bay this season. The vessel has helped more than 30 disabled ships since it was first stationed at the state's northwest corner in 1999. But as it stands now, there'll be no money to continue the service after next year. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty explains


Major Water Main Break in Seattle (2007-05-02)
Seattle's busy University Bridge is closed to traffic indefinitely -- after a large water main burst under the bridge, creating a massive sinkhole that swallowed two cars. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Immigrants Rally in Seattle (2007-05-02)
In Seattle, about 5,000 protesters gathered at the Seattle Center and marched to Westlake Park to support immigration reform. KPLU's Liam Moriarty spoke with some of the marchers and has this report


Unions Welcome John Edwards in Seattle (2007-05-02)
Democratic presidential hopeful John Edwards was in Seattle yesterday. He received a rousing welcome from the members of several labor unions. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:28)


Disappearing Ice in the Northwest (2007-05-02)
Northwest glaciers are melting at an accelerating pace according to the latest monitoring studies. Global warming is a likely culprit. KPLU's Tom Banse has more from a science conference in Tacoma.


Seattle Art Museum Grows Up (2007-05-01)
If you've driven by the downtown Seattle Art Museum lately, you've probably noticed its new look. A sleek silver building has been seamlessly connected to its north side. It's an expansion that more than doubles the museum's exhibition space and allows for future growth. The modernized SAM Downtown opens to the public this weekend. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp reports.


John Edwards Wooing Union Endorsement (2007-05-01)
Democratic Presidential contender John Edwards is in Seattle. His first stop was a town hall style meeting with union members. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp. (1:05)


D.C. Court Rules Against McDermott (2007-05-01)
Seattle Congressman Jim McDermott has lost an appeal in his long-running battle over his release of an illegally obtained phone conversation. That's the ruling of a Washington D-C court. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Patent Ruling is Big Win for Microsoft and Industry (2007-05-01)
A new ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court will save Microsoft billions. It reverses a lower-court ruling won by AT&T on the reach of U.S. patents overseas. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Police Stop Fighting Crime (2007-05-01)
Many Seattle police officers say they've stopped aggressively fighting crime. They say it's in reaction to what they consider frivolous complaints from the public. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has more.


Development Near Mt. St. Helens Sparks Controversy (2007-05-01)
A plan to allow up to one-thousand recreational cabins near the base of Mt. St. Helens is sparking controversy. Private timber companies want to convert forestland to build-able lots. Environmentalists are crying foul. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Blues Q&A: New Sounds from Veteran Musicians (2007-04-30)
Some of the most imaginative blues music being made today is coming from artists with a long history in the music business, but not necessarily in blues. In our music commentary this month, KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talks with KPLU All Blues Host John Kessler about three notable new releases.


Everett Vies for UW Branch Campus (2007-04-30)
People who live in Snohomish, Skagit and Island counties will soon be asked their opinion on the best location for what will be the state's newest university. Last week the legislature approved the idea for a for a new University of Washington branch campus. As KPLU's Gary Davis reports, one city wants to be considered the front-runner.


Oregon Child Care Providers Seek to Solidify Bargaining Rights (2007-04-30)
People who provide child-care for low-income parents in Oregon say it's getting harder to stay in business. They want more rights when it comes to negotiating a contract with the state. It's an issue Washington addressed two years ago, and it will be the subject of a debate in Oregon's capitol today. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Big rise in diabetes in King County (2007-04-30)
Sobering news about diabetes. The number of people in King County with the disease has doubled in the past ten years. That's from a new report by Public Health - Seattle and King County. More from KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld:


Microsoft Wins Patents Ruling (2007-04-30)
The U.S. Supreme Court has sided with Microsoft in a case that restricts the reach of U.S. patents overseas. The ruling could save the software giant billions. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Battles Over Threatened Spotted Owl Resume (2007-04-27)
Federal wildlife managers want to bait and shoot hundreds of non-native owls to save another owl species. And that, interestingly enough, is the tamest of several new controversies involving the feathered icon of the Northwest timber wars - the spotted owl. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Thiel on Sonics Woes (2007-04-27)
The Sonics made some major moves this week, in an attempt to get the team on a more positive track. But a lot of questions remain. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with sports columnist Art Thiel of the Seattle P-I about the big changes.


Community Development Agreements (2007-04-27)
If you're worried about developers ruining your community, you might think you have to lobby city hall to get new regulations. But a national group speaking at a brownbag forum in Seattle today (Friday 4-27) says they have a quicker form of help. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Charlie Chong Remembered (2007-04-27)
Seattle political activist and former city council member Charlie Chong has died. Chong became the city's anti-establishment icon during Seattle's big-money boom in the 1990's. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Barred Owl Shooting Proposed to Help Spotted Owl Survival (2007-04-27)
One species of owl may be shot to help another survive. The U-S Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to kill hundreds of non-native barred owls as part of a new recovery plan for the threatened spotted owl. We get more from KPLU's Tom Banse


Whale Tooth Smugglers Busted (2007-04-27)
A federal investigation into an international smuggling ring trafficking in endangered whale parts has snagged a western Washington man. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Toxic Cleanup Change Draws Fire (2007-04-27)
In response to a lawsuit, the state is proposing less-stringent cleanup standards for the toxic chemical dioxin. Environmentalists aren't happy. But neither is industry. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


Seattle Forum on Development Agreements (2007-04-27)
With condos sprouting up everywhere, Seattle is awash in new development. That's cause for concern among groups that fear they'll be pushed out of gentrified areas. But help may be in store. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp reports.


Toxic Cleanup Rules to Be Relaxed (2007-04-26)
When cleaning up an industrial site contaminated with toxic chemicals, how clean is clean enough? A new rule proposed by state environmental regulators would ease current standards. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Company Plans Tires-to-Oil Plant Near Yakima (2007-04-26)
High oil prices are leading entrepreneurs in the Northwest to revive an old idea. A startup company plans what it calls a "showcase" facility near Yakima to turn used tires into heating oil. KPLU's Tom Banse reports they'll have competition.


The Weak Dollar (2007-04-26)
Are you planning a trip overseas? Be prepared for sticker shock. A European vacation costs more these days, thanks to a weak dollar. KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Rented Bees Vital Cog for NW Farms (2007-04-26)
How's this for a career, following the blossoms around the West? Commercial beekeepers provide the air power to pollinate literally billions of dollars worth of crops. Lately, they also wage a constant battle to stay ahead of mites and disastrous hive diseases. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on an under-appreciated but vital cog in Northwest agriculture.


NW Escaping Worst of Foreclosure Wave (2007-04-25)
Mortgage foreclosures are soaring nationwide, but much less so here in the Northwest. KPLU's Tom Banse looked for reasons why.


Green Aircraft Fuel (2007-04-25)
Alternative fuels for cars are all the rage. And now Boeing has announced it's in a partnership to create bio-fuel for jets. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Seattle Pride Event Update (2007-04-25)
Seattle's annual gay pride parade may not be canceled after all. KPLU's Gary Davis reports on the latest twist in the story, and why there may now be two pride parades in June.


Matthew Bourne Interview: Edward Scissorhands for the Stage (2007-04-25)
British Choreographer Matthew Bourne is famous for his rendition of Swan Lake, which shocked audiences with an all-male cast and became the longest running ballet on Broadway. Now, Bourne has turned his attention to a gothic fairy tale: the 1990 Tim Burton movie, Edward Scissorhands. It comes to Seattle's Fifth Avenue Theater this week - for its final stop on a nationwide tour. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp caught up with Bourne and has this interview.


State Teacher Wins National Honor (2007-04-25)
For the first time in nearly forty years, a Washington State educator has been named the National Teacher of the Year. More from KPLU education reporter Gary Davis.


Green Building Summit (2007-04-25)
Washington was the first state to require all public buildings to meet environment-friendly standards. In Seattle, Northwest leaders in green building and design gathered to look to the future. KPLU's Liam Moriarty has more


Environmentalists Savor Legislative Gains (2007-04-25)
Environmental groups are spiking the ball in the end zone after a legislative session that saw a wide range of green initiatives meet with success. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Biofuel for Jets (2007-04-25)
Demand for alternative fuels is literally skyrocketing. Boeing has announced work on a partnership to develop a bio-fueled jet. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


One Stop for Haircut, Blood Pressure Check (2007-04-24)
Hair salons and barbershops have traditionally been gathering places for African Americans. That's why they've been asked to become educators about stroke and heart disease. KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld dropped in on a training session in a south Seattle barbershop.


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Striking Oil in Winery Waste (2007-04-24)
An enterprising Northwest couple is striking oil in other people's garbage. The garbage in this case is the tons and tons of crushed stems, skins and grape seeds generated by our region's booming wine industry. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from Prosser on the value that might hide in those winemaking leftovers.


Hair Salons, Barbershops Teach Good Health (2007-04-24)
Barbershops and hair salons are adding a new role -- as health counselors in the African-American community. They're entering the front-lines in the battle against heart disease and stroke. More from KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld.


Food for Thought: Too Many Freezers (2007-04-24)
In a recent column, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson confessed to home freezer overload. On today's Food for Thought she elaborates with KPLU's Dick Stein.


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Climate Protection Agreement Gains New Foothold (2007-04-24)
The movement to get local in the fight against global warming is gaining ground in the Northwest. And it's no longer just the usual suspects. Sandpoint has become the first North Idaho town to sign on to the US Mayors Climate Protection Agreement. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports.


Earthquakes - Drop & Cover: Still Best (2007-04-23)
If a major earthquake were to hit today or tomorrow, would you know how to protect yourself? Tuesday is Washington's annual earthquake and tsunami drill. Experts are warning people to ignore an internet rumor called "the Triangle of Life." KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld explains:


Legislative Session Wraps-Up (2007-04-23)
The State legislature has adjourned - wrapping up a four-month session. Lawmakers finished work last night [Sunday night] after passing a two-year, 33-billion dollar budget. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Seattle Council to Consider 520 Bridge Options (2007-04-23)
Neighborhood groups in Seattle have been pushing for a scaled-down alternative to the 520 floating bridge replacement. The Seattle City Council is slated to decide today what they want the project to look like. The activists are likely to be disappointed. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty.


Anti-Bullying Education (2007-04-23)
It's been a week since the killings at Virginia Tech. There's been a lot of attention focused on the psychological profile presented by the gunman Seung-Hui Cho. Some experts say Cho's introverted and anti-social behavior was proto-typical of a mass killer, a person lacking in empathy. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis talks with Joan Cole Duffell of the Committee for Children, a Seattle non-profit that develops anti-violence and anti-bullying curricula for schools worldwide.


Legislature Passes $33B Budget, Adjourns Sine Die (2007-04-23)
The state legislature has adjourned after a 105-day session. Majority Democrats yesterday [Sunday] passed a two-year, 33-billion dollar budget that invests heavily in education. They also passed legislation that eases up on high school graduation requirements. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this wrap-up.


Flags, Debate, Protest as WA Senate Debates War and Impeachment (2007-04-20)
For a few hours Thursday, the war in Iraq and presidential impeachment took center stage in the Washington State Senate. Passionate speeches were delivered. Demonstrators chanted. And Democrats and Republicans tried to out-do each other in the patriotism department. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports from the Senate floor.


UW Works With Iraqi Researcher (2007-04-20)
Seattle researchers are running into political frustrations as they try to study a possible cancer cluster in southern Iraq. Their key partner - an Iraqi doctor - can't get permission to visit the U-S. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld explains:


December Floods Report Released (2007-04-20)
The rain and windstorm that blew through the Northwest last December claimed lives, destroyed property and caused massive power outages. In one Seattle neighborhood, the intense rainfall overwhelmed city drains and caused flooding that drowned a woman in her home. Yesterday the city released the results of a study of the Madison Valley flood. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Thiel on Sonics Future (2007-04-20)
The future of the Sonics after next season is up in the air after the Legislature declined to vote on a proposal to use taxpayer money to help build a new arena for the team in Renton. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with sports columnist Art Thiel of the Seattle PI about what might be next for the franchise and why it may noth include much public funding.


Unemployment Fraud (2007-04-20)
People who are out of a job and actively seeking work can collect unemployment benefits but may abuse the system by continuing to cash those checks after they've found employment. That's costing Washington millions of dolars a year. THe state says some help is on the way. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


After the Deluge: A Look at Mt. Rainier National Park (2007-04-20)
If you visit Mount Rainier National Park when it re-opens next month, be prepared. The park's been closed all winter as work crews have scrambled to repair the damage caused last fall when torrential rains unleashed devastating floods. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty warns, you may not even recognize some of your favorite spots


Seattle Flood Report (2007-04-20)
The affects of last December's intense rainstorm are still being felt around the Northwest. In Seattle, a new report into the flooding that drowned a Madison Valley woman in her basement has been released. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


WA Senate Pauses to Discuss War, Impeachment (2007-04-20)
Protestors chanted in the galleries. Passionate speeches on the floor. This was the scene yesterday as the Washington State Senate took up the issue of the War in Iraq and Impeachment. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


NW Leads Rebellion Against National ID Card (2007-04-19)
The Northwest is part of a growing rebellion against the federal Real ID Act. That's the anti-terrorism law that requires states to revamp their driver's licenses to meet national standards. Yesterday Washington Governor Chris Gregoire signed legislation rejecting the federal mandate. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Hospital Infection Rates to be made Public (2007-04-19)
Hospitals that accidentally spread infections to their patients will have to report their mistakes to the public. It's a requirement approved this week by the Washington legislature. KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld explains.


Washington Legislature Winds Down (2007-04-19)
The state legislature is just days from adjournment. But lawmakers still need to pass a two-year budget. And a showdown is brewing over the WASL exam. Even so, there are signs the end is near. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has this update.


Puget Sound Seabirds in Decline (2007-04-19)
Nearly half the world's water bird species are in decline. That's according to an international study released earlier this year. While the losses were most dramatic in Asia and Africa; North America showed serious declines, as well. So how are seabirds in Puget Sound doing? KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty recently spoke with John Bower. He's an ornithologist and a professor at Western Washington University in Bellingham.


Hospitals Must Report Infections (2007-04-19)
You go into a hospital to get well, not to get sick. Yet, thousands of people in Washington acquire infections while they're hospitalized. As KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld explains, hospitals will now have to publicly disclose their infections.


Reaching Out to Virginia Tech (2007-04-19)
For the past few days, colleges and universities around the region have been holding candlelight vigils and sending condolences to Virginia Tech in the wake of the shootings this week. At Pacific Lutheran University, faculty and students participated in a "day of solidarity." More from KPLU's Paula Wissel.


Warren Buffet's Annual Report (2007-04-19)
Company annual reports can be rather dull to read. But Berkshire Hathaway's yearly update from CEO Warren Buffet is an exception. Financial Commentator Greg Heberlein looks at some of the highlights with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Will the Sonics Really Leave the NW? (2007-04-18)
Is the Northwest on the verge of losing one of its two NBA teams? The owner of the Sonics say there's "little hope" of remaining in the Puget Sound region. This comes after Washington lawmakers said they WON'T vote this session on a Sonics arena proposal. But KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports the Sonics are still the talk of the Capitol.


Food For Thought: Coffee Continued (2007-04-18)
As Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein continue last week's coffee klatsch, Nancy poses an intersting question.


Home Builders See Green in North Idaho (2007-04-18)
Eco-friendly homes aren't just for devoted environmentalists and well-heeled liberals anymore. At least, that's what two Northwest speculators are banking on. They're going where no green developer's gone before: North Idaho. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has their story.


WAMU Earnings Plummet (2007-04-18)
The weak housing market is hitting hard for one Seattle employer. Washington Mutual saw its earnings fall twenty percent amid problems in the sub-prime mortgage industry. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Gay Rights Lawsuit (2007-04-18)
A Bellevue 911 dispatcher and two firefighters say they're being discriminated against because of their sexual orientation. They've filed a lawsuit to force the city to provide them with the same benefits given to married employees. More from KPLU Law and Justice reporter Paula Wissel.


Home Builders See Green in North Idaho (2007-04-18)
Eco-friendly homes aren't just for devoted environmentalists and well-heeled liberals anymore. At least, that's what two Northwest speculators are banking on. They're going where no green developer's gone before: North Idaho. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has their story.


Home builders see green in North Idaho (2007-04-18)
Eco-friendly homes aren't just for devoted environmentalists and well-heeled liberals anymore. At least, that's what two Northwest speculators are banking on. They're going where no green developer's gone before: North Idaho. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has their story.


The Light in the Piazza: A Conversation with Adam Guettel (2007-04-17)
The musical "The Light in the Piazza" premiered at Seattle's Intiman Theater in 2003. Since then, it's garnered critical acclaim on Broadway and won six Tomy Awards. Two of those awards went to the man who composed the music and lyrics for the show, Adam Guettel. He's not exactly a household name, at least not yet. But he comes from quite a musical family. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with him, ahead of the show's return to Seattle tonight at the Paramount Theater.


Newspapers Settle (2007-04-17)
Seattle will remain a two-newspaper town. The Seattle Times Company and Hearst, which owns the Post Intelligencer, have settled a lawsuit that had threatened to shut down the PI. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Uncertainty Over WASL During Test Week (2007-04-17)
As high school students across the state are taking the math and science WASL this week, lawmakers in Olympia are trying to figure out the exam's future. More from KPLU Education reporter Jennifer Wing.


Seattle Remaining Two-Newspaper Town (2007-04-17)
Seattle's daily newspapers have settled the lawsuit that was threatening the city's future as a two-newspaper town. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has details on the new deal between the Seattle Times company and PI-owner Hearst.


Times and PI Settle Lawsuit (2007-04-17)
Seattle's future is secure as a two-newspaper town. The Seattle Times Company has settled its lawsuit against PI owner Hearst. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Local Colleges & Safety (2007-04-17)
In the wake of the shootings at Virginia Tech, the University of Washington and Seattle University stepped up security patrols. The tragedy also prompted colleges and universities in the region to take a closer look at their campus safety plans. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports.


No Sonics Vote This Year (2007-04-17)
The owner of the Sonics says "there's little hope" the team will remain in the Puget Sound region. Clay Bennett reacted last night to news that the legislature will NOT vote on a Sonics tax package this session. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has the latest.


Light Rail to Ballard? (2007-04-16)
Plans to run a light rail train from ballard to West Seattle are back on the drawing board. KPLU's Paula Wissel has the story.


One Week to Go in WA Legislature (2007-04-16)
Washington lawmakers are in the home stretch. This is the last week of the 105-day legislative session. Majority Democrats have passed several pieces of landmark legislation. This week the focus will be on passing the two-year budget. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Infectious Diseases in Era of Global Trade (2007-04-16)
You hear a lot about how global trade has grown. And you probably know that diseases - from mad cow disease to pandemic flu - can spread across borders. A University of Washington scientist has investigated the connection between disease and global trade. She talks with KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld:


Diabetes Complications are Common, Costly (2007-04-16)
One of the worst things about diabetes is the damage it does to parts of the body such as kidneys and eyes. A new study shows the complications are more widespread and costly than previously realized. KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld has the story.


Sonics Backers Go Into Double Overtime in Olympia (2007-04-16)
Sonics backers in Olympia are going into double overtime. With just over a week left in the legislative session, a Sonics bill passed out of a key Senate committee Friday. But the clock is running out on the team's bid for taxpayer dollars to build a new arena. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Climate Change Events on Saturday (2007-04-14)
An idea floated months ago in an online blog has snowballed into a nationwide event. Saturday, people in Seattle, Olympia, Portland and other Northwest cities will take part in a national day of events focused on solutions to global warming. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Seattle Chooses New Superintendent (2007-04-13)
Seattle schools have tabbed a new superintendent. KPLU education reporter Gary Davis was at district headquarters yesterday for the announcement.


Seattle Chooses New Superintendent (2007-04-13)
Seattle schools have selected a new leader. The school board chose Dr. Maria Goodloe-Johnson, of Charleston County, South Carolina to replace outgoing superintendent Raj Manhas. More from KPLU education reporter Gary Davis.


Thiel on NFL Get-Tough Policy (2007-04-13)
The NFL has a new "get-tough policy" when it comes to players who get into trouble with the law. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with sports columnist Art Thiel of the Seattle PI about the new rules, which took effect this week.


Oil Spill Legislation Strikes Out (2007-04-13)
Lawmakers in Olympia have decided to take a go-slow approach toward funding an array of oil spill prevention programs. That worries conservationists and local leaders who say the stakes are too high to delay putting new protections in place. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Winery Opening Symbolizes Arrival of NW Wine (2007-04-13)
The Northwest's love affair with the wine business shows no sign of abating. The number of wineries in Washington, Oregon and Idaho is fast approaching one thousand, if you can believe it. Italian nobility was on hand yesterday to help christen the latest debut. KPLU's Tom Banse has more on the state of the wine industry from Red Mountain near the Tri-Cities.


Weyerhaeuser Studying Biofuels (2007-04-13)
How many things can you make from a tree? Federal-way based timber giant Weyerhaeuser is teaming up with the Chevron oil company to work on developing biofuels. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Chevron and Weyerhaeuser Seeing Trees as Biofuels (2007-04-13)
With daily headlines about soaring gas prices and global warming, alternative fuels are hot. And all kinds of big businesses are taking notice. Weyerhaeuser is looking into selling bio-fuel made from cellulose. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has more.


Log Trucks Roll Through Capitol Campus in Olympia (2007-04-13)
It was one of the noisiest protests of the legislative session. Striking log truck drivers descended on Washington's Capitol Campus yesterday. The drivers were protesting low hauling rates. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Extended Deployments Stress Home Front (2007-04-12)
Thousands of Northwest military families are getting unwelcome news. The Army is adding three months to the year-long tours of soldiers in Iraq. KPLU's Tom Banse has reaction from Fort Lewis.


Immigration Rally (2007-04-12)
Hundreds of immigrant children and their parents took to the streets of Seattle yesterday. They say immigration policies are tearing families apart. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Families Rally for Immigration Reform (2007-04-12)
A broken immigration system is tearing families apart. That was the message as hundreds of children and parents marched through the streets of Seattle calling for reform. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Shop/Live at Goodwill (2007-04-12)
Big plans are underway to turn an industrial are near the International District into a shopping plaza topped by hundreds of apartments. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, the project faces some hurdles.


Disputes with Your Broker (2007-04-12)
If you ever get into a dispute with your stockbroker, you may find your options are limited. Did you read the fine print when you opened your account? KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


For the Love of Coffee (2007-04-11)
How do you take your coffee? On this week's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson talks with KPLU's Dick Stein about her version of the perfect cup of joe.


NW States Consider Tax to Fund Paid Family Leave (2007-04-11)
Should the government pay you to take care of a new baby or seriously ill parent? That's the question lawmakers in Washington and Oregon are debating as they consider Paid Family Leave proposals. Currently only California offers this taxpayer-funded insurance program. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Northwest Sailors Augment "Boots On The Ground" in Iraq (2007-04-11)
Most people think of the Navy's role in the War in Iraq as patrolling the Persian Gulf and Arabian Sea. But more than a hundred sailors from the Northwest have left their usual posts to join the "boots on the ground." The deaths of three in urban combat this past week highlight that no military branch is exempt from Iraq's dangers. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Civil Air Patrol Tests Plane Mounted Tsunami Warning (2007-04-11)
The West Coast has hundreds of miles of beaches and just a smattering of tower mounted tsunami warning sirens. The volunteer Civil Air Patrol is testing an earsplitting airborne loudspeaker to potentially fill some of the gaps. KPLU's Tom Banse took a listen.


Maritime Air Pollution Measured (2007-04-11)
Thousands of container vessels, ferries and other commercial boats ply the waters of Puget Sound. Ever wonder how much air pollution they create? KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story


On The Road Again. At Last. (2007-04-11)
The end is in sight for the debacle that's been keeping one verylarge truck load stuck at the Idaho-Washington border for three weeks. A 100-ton section of the new Tacoma Narrows Bridge is expected to hit the road tonight. With a new configuration and a new haulerin charge. It'll be formidable presence on the highway. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports.


White Lawmakers and the WASL (2007-04-11)
The Seattle teachers' union is accusing state lawmakers of only looking out for the interests of white students when it comes to making changes to the WASL exam. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing explians.


Dream Project (2007-04-10)
Some students at the University of Washington are becoming experts of the school's admissions process, in an effort to make the University more diverse. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing has more.


Nuke Plant Shuts Down After Fire (2007-04-10)
The Northwest's only commercial nuclear power plant shut down yesterday to allow further investigation of a weekend fire. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Predators Nab Endangered Rabbits (2007-04-10)
Predators have nearly wiped out a group of endangered pygmy rabbits that were reintroduced into the wild last month. But federal and state biologists are not giving up on future experimental releases. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Cruise Waste Treatment (2007-04-10)
Cruise ships calling on the port of Seattle each week generate huge amounts of wastewater. Currently they're responsible for treating that sewage while at sea with high tech equipment they have on board. But King County is considering a plan to direct it on shore. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Heroin & Cocaine Bust (2007-04-10)
Federal agents say they've shut down a major heroin and cocaine ring operating in King and Snohomish counties. The alleged leader is a college student from Bothell. KPLU Law and Justice Reporter Paula Wissel has the story.


King County Cruise Waste Study (2007-04-10)
Cruise ships are an increasingly common site on Seattle's waterfront. About 150 of these huge floating hotels will call on the city this summer. Some fear the sewage they generate could threaten the health of Puget Sound. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Thiel on Baseball Demographics (2007-04-09)
The number of Major League Baseball players born outside the US has increased to near record levels. Seattle PI sports columnist Art Thiel says there are "pros and cons" to this latest statistic. He talked by phone this week with KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick.


Youth Gambling on the Rise (2007-04-09)
It's illegal for young people in our state. But that's not stopping them from getting involved in problem gambling. Counselors and others concerned about the issue are meeting in Seattle. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Global Warming Impacts Report (2007-04-09)
Climate change in the Northwest is happening faster than previously thought. That's from the latest United Nations scientific report on global warming. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Historic Driving Tour (2007-04-09)
Have you ever driven from Seattle to Sponake and wished you knew more about the people or owns you were seeing? The Washington Arts Commission has come up with a creative solution. More from KPLU's Paula Wissel.


Is Boat Noise Harming the Orcas? (2007-04-09)
Orca whales live in a world of sound. It's how they communicate, navigate and find food. Now, federal researchers want to know if the underwater noise made by ships and boats in Puget Sound is making life hard for the orcas. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Pasco Boom (2007-04-09)
We've all heard of the explosive growth in Bend, greater Boise, and Coeur d'Alene. But did you know the very fastest growing area of the Northwest is Franklin County in south-central Washington? Dig deeper into the population numbers and you'll find another distinction. The county is the first in the region to become majority Hispanic. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from the Franklin County seat of Pasco.


WA Lawmakers Tackle Healthcare Reform (2007-04-09)
It's like turning around a giant cruise ship. That's how one Washington lawmaker describes efforts to reform healthcare. The Washington legislature this year is poised to begin that dramatic course correction. Lawmakers say it won't happen overnight, but they claim this is the start of something big. If successful, healthcare reform will reduce costs and change how you buy insurance. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


BC Flood Worries (2007-04-05)
Western Washington's snowpack is about normal for this time of year. But in British Columbia record snowpack levels are creating the potential for major flooding this spring. More from KPLU's Gary Davis.


Northwest Stocks Outperform The Market (2007-04-05)
Northwest stocks showed very little movement in the first quarter of this year. But when you look at the past decade, they're clearly outperforming the rest of the market. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein examines the numbers with KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Seattle Bike Plan (2007-04-05)
Seattle has unveiled a plan it says will dramatically increase the number of people commuting by bicycle. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports.


NW Cities Compete To Host Presidential Debate (2007-04-05)
We don't even know who the candidates will be in the Presidential race of 2008. But already cities are vying for the opportunity to host their debates. In the West, only Washington, Oregon and Arizona are in the running. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports.


Search and Rescue Task Force: Better Coordination Needed (2007-04-05)
Better communication and better coordination. That's what's needed to carry out wilderness searches more effectively, according to a report issued today (Wednesday by an Oregon task force. It was created after two high-profile searches ended with tragic results. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


UW Tragedy a Case Study in Domestic Violence (2007-04-04)
Too often, domestic violence cases spiral downward to tragic ends. The apparent murder-suicide of a University of Washington employeeby her former boyfriend is only the latest reminder of that. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports on how a highly-publicizedcase like this reflects an ongoing issue.


Possible New Leader for Seattle Schools (2007-04-04)
After interviewing six candidates over the past few days, the Seattle school board says two people stand out for the district's top job. More from KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing.


WA Legislature Passes PBDE Ban (2007-04-04)
Washington is poised to become the first state in the nation to outlaw a family of flame-retardants found in mattresses, furniture and electronics. The chemical ban cleared the legislature yesterday [Tuesday] and now goes to the Governor. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Boeing Flying High on 787 (2007-04-04)
The Boeing Company says the success of its 787 Dreamliner is unprecedented - even though the first one has yet to roll off the assembly line. There are now more than 500 orders for the new jet. The company held a special ceremony for employees to celebrate. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp was there.


Seabird Die-Off Noted for Third Year in a Row (2007-04-04)
For the third year in a row, unusual numbers of seabirds are turning up dead on West Coast beaches. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Food For Thought: Ethnic Food (2007-04-04)
You don't need a passport or a travel agent to sample the world's food. There's plenty of it right here in the Puget Sound area; as Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson tells KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


Freshman Senator Says WA Speaker is "Like a Dictator" (2007-04-04)
A freshman state senator is taking on the Speaker of the House. Democrat Brian Weinstein says Speaker Frank Chopp is acting like a dictator. Weinstein is angry because Chopp killed his proposal to protect homeowners from shoddy builders. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports on this dust-up within the Democratic majority.


Two Choices to Lead Seattle Schools (2007-04-04)
The Seattle School District is one step closer to having a new leader. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing tells us the school board has narrowed the search for the next superintendent down to two people.


Boeing's 787 Breaking Sales Records (2007-04-04)
Boeing is looking for ways to meet increasing demand for its new jet, the 787. With new orders coming in every week, the Dreamliner has become the fastest-selling plane in the company's history. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


NW Reaction to Supreme Court Carbon Ruling (2007-04-03)
A U.S. Supreme Court ruling that struck a blow to the Bush Administration's approach to global warming will be felt in the Northwest. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Supreme Court Ruling a Victory for West Coast States (2007-04-03)
Washington, Oregon and California are among the 12 states that just won a Supreme Court fight with the Bush Administration over global warming. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


NASCAR Gives Up Bid for Northwest Track - For Now (2007-04-03)
Plans for a NASCAR track in Washington have come crashing to a halt. At least for this year. The track developer announced late yesterday [Monday] that it's ending its bid to build a track on the Kitsap Peninsula. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Protestors Vindicated in WTO Settlement (2007-04-03)
The City of Seattle is paying a million dollars to settle a lawsuit brought by WTO protestors. The plaintiffs say it's not just the money that's making them happy. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


WTO Settlement (2007-04-03)
WTO protestors and their attorneys are declaring victory. The city of Seattle is paying a million dollars to settle a lawsuit for the illegal arrest of about 175 people during the protests seven years ago. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Stopping Malaria at SBRI (2007-04-03)
We have lots of hidden places in Seattle, including a hidden swamp. It's a man-made swamp, to breed mosquitoes that carry malaria. Don't worry, it's indoor. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld took a tour, to find out about genetically altered bugs.


Seattle Teachers Union Joins AFL-CIO (2007-04-02)
It's an alliance of two groups that probably should have gotten together long ago. The Seattle teachers union has joined the AFL-CIO. Both organizations say it will make them stronger. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Talking to Teachers from Prison (2007-04-02)
It's widely known that kids do better in school when their parents are involved. For parents in prison, this can be difficult, but not impossible. KPLU's Jennifer Wing explains.


Civil Air Patrol Pilots Drill for Terrorist Attack (2007-04-02)
Volunteer piolots from the Civil Air Patrol were practicing across the Northwest last weekend on how to respond to a terrorist attack. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Civil Air Patrol Pilots Drill for Terrorist Attack (2007-04-02)
Volunteer piolots from the Civil Air Patrol were practicing across the Northwest last weekend on how to respond to a terrorist attack. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Simple Measures at Prison Save Taxpayers Big Bucks (2007-04-02)
Just about every Western state is paying big bucks to expand its prisons. Inmates at one lock-up near Olympia shaved more than a million dollars off the taxpayer's tab with some simple measures. KPLU's Tom Banse reports from the Cedar Creek Corrections Center.


Civil Air Patrol Pilots Drill for Terrorist Attack (2007-04-02)
Volunteer piolots from the Civil Air Patrol were practicing across the Northwest last weekend on how to respond to a terrorist attack. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Tully's Shareholders Excited (2007-03-30)
Shareholders of Tully's Coffee eagerly greeted executives yesterday at the company's annual meeting in Seattle. The chain now has 128 stores and plans to go public next month/ KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has the story.


GAO Slams Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (2007-03-30)
The project to clean up Hanford nuclear waste is eight years behind schedule and eight billion dollars over-budget. Now the Government Accountability Office is assigning blame. It says lax oversight and poor management have plagued the project. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Tully's Annual Meeting (2007-03-30)
It began fifteen years ago as the chain that would rival Starbucks. Today, Tully's Coffee has only a fraction of the stores and is still struggling to make a profit. But executives assured shareholders at their annual meeting in Seattle that the company is moving ahead with plans to go public next month. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Thiel on 2007 Baseball Season (2007-03-30)
The Mariners kick-off their 2007 season Monday afternoon at Safeco Field with a game against the Oakland A's. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with sports columist Art Thiel of the Seattle PI about some of the "drama" we can expect out of Mahor League Baseball this year.


Beating the Market (2007-03-29)
Investors dream of buying the right stocks at the right time and making a fortune. Many are sadly dissapointed, but some people make it work. How do they do it? KPLU's Dave meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Tidal Power Gets Nudge Forward (2007-03-29)
A new source of clean energy for the Northwest has just gotten a nudge forward. Over the past month, federal regulators have cleared the way for feasibility studies on eight tidal power projects. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Local Orcas Spending More Time in California (2007-03-29)
Many of the Northwest's resident orca whales have recently been spotted off the California coast near monterrey. ONe whale expert says they're spending more time down there in recent years and he thinks he knows why. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Food For Thought - Emergency Quickie Meals (2007-03-28)
When cooking time's at a premium, you need one of Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson's emergency quickie recipes; a few of which she shares with KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food for Thought.


National Park Entrance Fee Increases Draw Gripes (2007-03-28)
The National Park Service is raising entrance fees at some popular Western parks. The price of admission doubles next year in some cases. And that's drawing complaints, as KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Randy Newman Q&A (2007-03-28)
Singer/songwriter Randy Newman has never shied away from political satire. Back in the sixties, his song, "Political Science," portrayed an arrogant American that planned to drop the big one. More recently, he's been skewering President Bush. But he's also made a name for himself writing film scores, including Toy Story and Monsters, Inc, which won him an Oscar. He'll be at the Paramount Theatre this Friday with Bob Edwards. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick spoke with him by phone.


Payday Lending Reforms Appear Dead in Legislature (2007-03-28)
Legislation to reform payday lending industry in Washington state appears to be dead. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports on what happened behind-the-scenes.


Birthday Wish List for NW National Parks (2007-03-28)
The 100th birthday of the National Park system is nearly a decade away, in 2016. But park lovers and National Park superintendents from the Northwest are already drawing up birthday wish lists. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on the Interior Secretary's recent visit to Seattle to listen to requests.


Navy Considers Guard Dolphins at Bangor (2007-03-28)
The Navy wants to know what you think. It hopes to use trained dolphins and sea lions to guard the waters around bangor nuclear submarine base on the Kitsap Peninsula. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Immigration Reform Bill (2007-03-27)
It's the latest installment in the immigration reform debate and Seattle-area activists are applauding. A new bill in Congress would change the status of thousands of illegal workers in the United States. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp reports.


Sims Joins Immigrant Activists (2007-03-27)
King County Executive Ron Sims joined activists at Seattle's City Hall as they urged congress to move forward with a new immigration reform bill. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


WA Prison Officials Issue New Rules for Parolees (2007-03-27)
Washington prison officials are taking steps to immediately improve the supervision of parolees. The action follows the deaths of three police officers at the hands of recently released inmates. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has details


Groundfishing Fleet On Strike (2007-03-26)
A strike by the majority of the Pacific Coast groundfishing fleet is entering its fourth week with no end in sight. More than a hundred trawlers have stayed tied to the docks in Washington, Oregon, and California because of a price dispute. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Jewish Federation Reopens (2007-03-26)
Leaders ofthe Jewish community in Seattle are rebuilding. The city's Jewish Federation and several allied groups will hold a celebration this weekend as they move back to the space downtown that was marred by a fatal shooting last summer. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Bridge Held Up By Red Tape. Seriously. (2007-03-26)
Picture in your mind a 200-thousand pound slinky. That pretty well describes the very large piece of steel freight that's stuck on atruck alongside Interstate 90 just west of the Idaho border. It's on its way to the Narrows bridge project in Western Washington. But now the state says the load is too heavy and won't allow it to go any further. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson explains.


Prescribing Narcotics for Pain (2007-03-26)
You've heard about people getting addicted to prescription painkillers such as oxy-contin. Many doctors have trouble finding the right dose. Now leaders of six state agencies are offering guidelines. KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld explains.


HIV in Black Community (2007-03-26)
The AIDS epidemic has impacted African AMericans more than any other racial group. In Washington, blacks are five times more likely to have AIDS than whites. Renewed efforts are underway to fight the disease, including a town hall meeting this week in Tacoma. KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld has more.


Growing Toxic Threat to Orcas (2007-03-26)
Puget Sound orca whales carry a lot of toxins that have accumulated in their bodies. It comes from eating contaminated fish. That's despite the fact that many of those chemicals haven't been used for decades. Now a prominent researcher says a common fire retardant could pose an even larger threat. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty.


What's in a Name? Wine Regions Try to Bottle Integrity (2007-03-26)
Regional winemakers are taking preemptive action to stop mislabled or ripoff wines before they're uncorked. Washington and Oregon are among thirteen global wine regions to sign a pact to protect the integrity of place names. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Thiel on Mariners (2007-03-23)
The Mariners have one more week to go in spring training before they face the Oakland A's in their home opener April 2nd at Safeco Field. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with sports columnist Art Thiel of the Seattle PI about how the M's are looking this season. He joined her by phone from the Mariners' taining camp in Arizona.


Starbucks' Ethiopia Policy (2007-03-22)
More shareholders than could fit into Seattle's opera house turned out for Starbucks' annual meeting. During the Q&A session with company execs, several asked for an explanation of the company's stance over a recent dispute with Ethiopia, over trademarks and coffee prices. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has more.


Teens and Drinking (2007-03-22)
Nearly one in five high school sophomores in Washington went to school drunk or high in the past year. That's one of the more disturbing numbers in a just released health survey of the state's middle and high school students. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, it isn't all bad news.


Stabucks' Ethiopia Policy (2007-03-22)
More shareholders than could fit into Seattle's opera house turned out for Starbucks' annual meeting. During the Q&A session with company execs, several asked for an explanation of the company's stance over a recent dispute with Ethiopia, over trademarks and coffee prices. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has more.


Securities Analysts (2007-03-22)
Stock analysts always seem to have plenty of buy recommendations but are more reluctant to issue a sell advisory. Financial commentator Greg Heberlein explains how it works to KPLU's Dave Meyer.


Stabucks' Ethiopia Policy (2007-03-22)
More shareholders than could fit into Seattle's opera house turned out for Starbucks' annual meeting. During the Q&A session with company execs, several asked for an explanation of the company's stance over a recent dispute with Ethiopia, over trademarks and coffee prices. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has more.


Wind Farm Growth Requires More Back Up Power (2007-03-22)
Power managers are sounding a note of caution about the rapid growth of wind farms in the Northwest. A report released yesterday says wind energy alone cannot meet the region's rising demand for electricity. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Food For Thought: Knives (2007-03-21)
Time now for a trip to the cutting edge with Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein on today's Food For Thought.


Maury Island Gravel Mine Bill (2007-03-21)
A nine-year-old battle over a gravel mine on Maury Island is raising its head in Olympia today. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Pike Place Birthday (2007-03-21)
City leaders are launching a campaign to reintroduce Seattle to one of its most famous landmarks. More from KPLU's Paula Wissel.


The Birth of Bebop: Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker from 1945 (2007-03-20)
It isn't everyday that you can actually hear musical history being made. But that's exactly what happened in 1945 on the Armed Forces Radio Network when audiences were introduced to a very different kind of jazz.


Washington and Oregon Join Forces to Offer Prescription Drug Card (2007-03-20)
It's a first in the nation. Washington and Oregon have created a multi-state prescription drug consortium. The idea is to pool purchasing power and drive down prices. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Seattle Rates High on Environmental Scorecard (2007-03-20)
The folks who bring you Earth Day each year have issued an environmental scorecard that puts Seattle among the nations' greenest cities. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


War Protests Planned (2007-03-19)
Opponents of the Iraq War plan to turn up the volume on their cause. THree events are planned for Seattle on SUnday and Monday to mark the fourth anniversary of the Iraq invasion. KPLU's Gary Davis has more.


Gray Whale Migration Includes Puget Sound (2007-03-19)
Every spring, thousands of gray whales migrate up the Pacific coast, from breeding grounds in Mexico to feeding grounds in Alaska. And each year, a handful find their way into Puget Sound. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Border Patrol Detains 7 at Temporary Checkpoint (2007-03-19)
You've heard of D-U-I checkpoints. Now get ready for U-S Border Patrol checkpoints. The federal agency is stepping-up its use of random stops on Northwest roads that could be used by terrorists. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Small Oil Spills Add Up (2007-03-19)
A derelict boat spilled a small amount of diesel fuel into a secluded bay off Hood Canal this week. Experts say the incident shows that it doesn't take an oil tanker spill to threaten the environment. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty


Stay or Go? How Employees Decide (2007-03-19)
It's the old cliche of Pavlov's dog: when it comes to motivation, focus on positive re-enforcement. That's the gist of a study by researchers at the University of Washington, who were looking into the question of what motivates employees to stay put, or leave their jobs. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Prison Reform: Inmates Enroll in Therapeutic Communities (2007-03-19)
In some Northwest prisons, wardens are trying something different to transform hardened criminals into law-abiding citizens. Several hundred inmates in Washington, Oregon and Idaho are enrolled in what's called a therapeutic community. It's basically an intensive reform school for drug and alcohol addicted inmates nearing the end of their sentence. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Rescue the Rescuers? (2007-03-19)
Some Northwest lawmakers are worried that the Pentagon is poised to get rid of a helicopter rescue team at Spokane's Fairchild Air Force Base. Emergency responders in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana rely on the military rescue unit to help cover a broad swath of remote terrain. What would it mean to lose it? KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports.


Circus Contraption at Moisture Festival (2007-03-16)
If the March weather's got you down, artists in Seattle have the perfect antidote. Now in its 4th year, the weird and wonderful Moisture Festival continues through the end of the month with all kinds of comedy and burlesque entertainment from around the world. The 13-member Seattle troupe Circus Contraption takes center-stage tonight and tomorrow. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp has this profile.


Thiel on NCAA Tournament (2007-03-16)
Washington State is moving on and Gonzaga is out after the opening round of the NCAA men's basketball trounament yesterday. The Cougars face Vanderbilt next, tomorrow afternoon. There's a reason they call this time of the year "March Madness." Emotions run high. And there's a lot at stake for players, coaches, and schools. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with sports columnist Art Thiel with Seattle PI about that.


Progress and protest around Vancouver Olympics (2007-03-16)
Up in Vancouver, B-C, Olympics organizers had something good to talk about yesterday (Thurs.) after being on the defensive against increasingly rowdy anti-Olympic protests. They announced the 2010 Games are "on track" with a balanced budget. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


USDA Proposes Relaxing Beef Imports from Canada (2007-03-16)
Cattle ranchers in Washington are still smarting from the Mad Cow scare of 2003. Now, they fear a proposed federal rule relaxing import restrictions on Canadian beef could hurt them again. KPLU's Liam Moriarty has more


Cattlemen Oppose More Canadian Beef Imports (2007-03-16)
Washington cattle ranchers are still recovering from the economic hit they took four years ago. That's when a cow imported from Canada tested positive for mad cow disease. Now, a federal proposal to ease restrictions on Canadian beef has them worried. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty


WA Prisons Chief Issues Report on Police Officer Deaths (2007-03-16)
Washington's parole and probation system is under-funded and overburdened. But steps are being taken to improve the situation. That's the upshot of an investigation into three Seattle-area law enforcement officers at the hands of parolees (since last August). KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more.


Scientists Say Cascade Snowpack Has Not Declined 50% Afterall (2007-03-15)
The Cascade Mountain snowpack in Washington and Oregon has supposedly declined fifty-percent since 1950. That alarming statistic has taken on a life of it's own in the Northwest. The problem is, Northwest scientists say it's not accurate. But when a leading researcher tried to set the record straight, he lost a prestigious appointment. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Telephone Tax Credit (2007-03-15)
If you saw dollar bills on the sidewalk, would you pick them up? Millions of people are skipping over an item on their tax returns that could save them at least thirty dollars. KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


WA State Likely To Copy Canola-Free Zones From Oregon and Idaho (2007-03-15)
Home grown fuel is all the rage in political and environmental circles. But some farmers don't want to go near it with a ten-foot pole. Actually, they'd prefer the oilseed crops stay many miles away. KPLU's Tom Banse explains why the concept of "canola-free zones" is gaining ground.


Big Money to Help Foster Care Kids (2007-03-15)
Distrubing stories involving children in foster care seem to make the news every week. While these cases are not the norm, child advocates say there is a lot that can be done to improve Washington State's child welfare system. KPLU's Jennifer Wing tells us about a new organization that is setting out to do just that.


Organic Dairies Facing Feed Pinch (2007-03-15)
If trends continue, Washington's 30, 000 certified organic dairy cows will soon be eating more feed than their owners can find. The state Department of Agriculture is encouraging local farmers to tap into that market. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Improving Life for Foster Kids (2007-03-15)
Distrubing stories involving children in foster care seem to make the news every week. While these cases are not the norm, child advocates say there is a lot that can be done to improve Washington State's child welfare system. KPLU's Jennifer Wing tells us about a new organization that is setting out to do just that.


Rare NW Rabbits Released Back Into The Wild (2007-03-14)
One of the most endangered animals in the Northwest is getting a second shot at freedom. Twenty Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits have been returned to the wild in north central Washington. Five years ago, the few remaining pygmy rabbits there were rounded up and placed in a captive breeding program. KPLU's Tom Banse has an early Easter tale.


Public Hearings on Proposal to Bring Radioactive Waste to Northwest (2007-03-14)
Friends and foes of the nuclear industry are expected to pack public hearings in Washington, Idaho and Oregon over the next few weeks. The U-S Department of Energy is considering three sites in the Northwest to process spent nuclear fuel. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Roads and Transit Kickoff (2007-03-14)
Lately, Seattle's viaduct controversy has been grabbing all the headlines. But, as they say, "you ain't seen nothin' yet." A masive package of transportation projects is slated to go before King, Pierce, and Snohomish county voters in November. This month, public meetings are being held before the plan is finalized. KPLU environment reporter LIam Moriarty went to one of these meetings, to hear what people had to say.


It's Hard to Be a Critic (2007-03-14)
Oh, you may think that being a big city restaurant critic is a glamorous job, but Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson begs to differ - as she tells KPLU's Dick Stein on Today's Food for Thought.


Viaduct Vote is No & No (2007-03-14)
Seattle voters have soundly rejected both options on an advisory ballot to replace the aging Alaskan Way Viaduct. Last night's results of the all-mail election show just 45-percent favor a rebuild of the viaduct, with only 30-percent in support of a tunnel option. Today the spotlight moves to Olympia, when state leaders will weigh in with their interpretation of the message from yesterday's vote. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


King County's New Image (2007-03-13)
King County changing its logo to include the likeness of Martin Luther King, Jr. may have been a politically easy decision. It passed the council unanimously. But as KPLU law and justice reporter Paula Wissel explains, the King family hasn't endorsed the move and that leaves the door open to complications in the future.


Native American Art to Combat Cancer (2007-03-13)
Your mind may be wandering whenever scientists start talking about statistics. They're wondering if this might especially be a barrier to reaching Native Americans. As KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld explains, they're trying a new partnership with artists and storytellers.


Nearly 4,000 NW Soldiers Prepare to Leave for Iraq (2007-03-13)
Nearly 4,000 Washington State-based soldiers are preparing to leave for Iraq. Yesterday [Monday] they received a formal send-off at the Fort Lewis Army base near Tacoma. KPLU's Austin Jenkins was there.


Foreign Language for Elementary Students (2007-03-13)
Learning a foreign language in elementary school is not required in Washington State. But a bill moving ahead in Olympia would make foreign language classes part of the regular school day in two school districts. KPLU education reporter Jennifer Wing has more.


Well Behaved Parents and Children (2007-03-12)
We have all seen children throw temper tantrums when their parents won't buy them what they want.And just about every parent has struggled at one time or another with giving in, to his or her child's demands. Parents who want their children to have some manners need to look at their own behavior first. KPLU's Jennifer Wing speaks with Doctor Sal Severe, the author of "How to Behave so your Children will, Too."


Maritime Strategy Symposium (2007-03-12)
The world is changing quickly and so is the United States Navy. At least, that's the impression you get from a maritiime stategy symposium that's been touring the cournty and made a recent stop in Seattle. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp reports.


Emotions Flow 50 Years After Dam Submerges Celilo Falls (2007-03-12)
Well over a thousand people converged on the Columbia Gorge this weekend to mark an anniversary. It's 50 years since the flooding of Celilo Falls by The Dalles Dam. Celilo was a major fishing and tribal trading center for thousands of years. Now it lies under a tame pool of slackwater. KPLU's Tom Banse was there for a commemoration that blended mourning with hope for a better future.


WA Off-Road Riders and Homeowners Face-Off (2007-03-12)
A battle is brewing between fed-up homeowners and dirt-bike riders in Washington. The homeowners want to shutdown backyard racetracks. The riders say this is an attack on a family sport. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Viaduct Ballots Keep Coming (2007-03-12)
The deadline is tomorrow to vote on Seattle's viaduct replacement. About a third of registered voters have sent in their ballots. It's the city's first ever vote-by-mail election. KPLU's Keith Seinfeld reports.


First Time Food (2007-03-12)
On this week's Food For Thought, Seattle Times Restaurant Critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's own Dick Stein share stories of their "first times."


Washington Poised for Major Expansion of Tribal Gaming (2007-03-09)
Washington State voters have twice rejected gambling initiatives. But that's not stopping a major expansion of tribal gaming. The State Gambling Commission and Governor are expected to allow more tribal slot machines and let casinos stay open more hours of the day. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Oregon and Washington Try Different Apporaches to Gay Rights (2007-03-09)
Voters and the courts in the Northwest have said no to gay marriage. But that's not stopping gay rights advocates. And they've found a friendly audience with new Democratic majorities in Olympia and Salem. State lawmakers are considering proposals to give gay and lesbian couples some of the same rights married couples have. We have reporters in both capitols, following the issue.


West Seattle Site Put On Superfund List (2007-03-09)
A former shipyard in West Seattle has been put on the federal Superfund priority list for toxic clean-up. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Thiel on High School Sports Fan Misconduct (2007-03-09)
The state Division 3A high school basketball tournament runs through Saturday. There will, no doubt, be lots of cheering from the fans in the stands. There may also be some booing. The "jeers" that so often accompany high school sports may be on their way out in our state. The Washington Interscholastic Activities Association is considering new guidlines to crack down on negative behavior. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick spoke by phone to sports columnist Art Thiel of the Seattle PI.


Sex Education Reform (2007-03-09)
Sex education in Washington schools can vary widely from district to district. But that's about to change. Washington lawmakers are poised to pass legislation that would require any district teaching sex-ed to include information about preventing pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. More from KPLU Education reporter Gary Davis.


Saving Native Plants (2007-03-09)
You've heard of conservationists getting together to plant trees. But how about a gathering to dig them up? That's what will be happening this weekend at the Snoqualmie Ridge development in King County. KPLU's Paula Wissel explains.


Sex Education Supporters Cheer Reform (2007-03-09)
Sex education in Washington schools can vary widely from district to district. But that's about to change. Washington lawmakers are poised to pass legislation that would require any distict teaching sex-ed to include information about preventing pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. More from KPLU education reporter Gary Davis.


Feds Make West Seattle Shipyard a Cleanup Priority (2007-03-09)
Another contaminated industrial site in Seattle's harbor has just earned a place on the federal Superfund clean-up list. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Specialty LIcense Plates: Boom or Bust? (2007-03-08)
Your license plates can to a lot more than just identify your car. They can declare you alma mater. Proclaim your support for a state landmark. Announce your status as a Purple Heart recipient. But what do these and other "specialty plates" do for states that issue them? That depends. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson explains.


Nickels To Boost Police Force (2007-03-08)
Seattle is the among safest large cities in America, but more needs to be done. That's according to Mayor Greg Nickels. In his annual State of the City address, Nickels unveiled his plan to re-invent the Seattle Police Department. KPLU's Liam Moriarty reports.


Mayor Slams Viaduct in State of the City Address (2007-03-08)
Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels used his State of the City address to urge Seattleites to reject the proposed new elevated highway along the waterfront. More from KPLU's Liam Moriarty.


Cell Phone as Computer (2007-03-08)
Consider for a moment how many ways there are storing information. You can put it on a floppy disc or a cd-rom, on an iPod or an MP3 player. And what about your cellular phone? KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp interviewed a grad student at the University of Washington who is helping business people in the developing world use cell phones as computers.


CEO Compensation (2007-03-08)
Are CEO salaries too high? If you own stocks, you may be getting proxy statements in the mail that include information on executive compensation. KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


WA Republicans Push Crackdown on Probation Violators (2007-03-07)
Criminals on probation have killed three Seattle-area police officers since August. Minority Republicans in the legislature say it's time to get tough on probation violators. But so far they're having a hard time getting majority Democrats to go along. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


McKay Testifies (2007-03-07)
Former US Attorney John McKay says shortly after the contested gubernatorial race in Washington state in 2004 he received a call from a Republican congressman's office. He says the chief of staff for Doc Hastings wanted to talk about allegations of voter fraud. More from KPLU law and justice reporter Paula Wissel.


OIl Spill Funding Bills in Limbo (2007-03-07)
Two bills intended to maintain and boost oil spill prevention in Washington are undergoing backroom surgery in Olympia, in a last-ditch effort to keep them alive. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has the story.


Tanks Shoot Down Roadside Avalanches (2007-03-07)
Would you believe that the Washington Department of Transportation deploys two Vietnam-era army tanks each winter? Or that the Idaho Transportation Department has permits for "helibombing." Highway crews use the heavy weaponry to shoot down roadside avalanches. A visit by a book author highlights a hundred year trend of increasingly aggressive measures to control avalanches in the Northwest. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


WA State Plans to Sue Bush Administration Over Infant Healthcare (2007-03-06)
Newborn babies of illegal immigrants are caught in a fight over a new Bush Administration initiative to cut illegals off the healthcare rolls. The Administration plans to require that immigrant parents prove the citizenship of their newborn before the infant receives taxpayer-funded healthcare coverage. KPLU's Austin Jenkins has more.


Premera Gives up on Privatizing (2007-03-06)
Premera Blue Cross has pulled the plug on its long-running attempt to become a for-profit company. The insurance company says it's ready to move on. The state supreme court was supposed to announce this week whether it would consider Premera's case. More from KPLU's Keith Seinfeld.


Life on the Beat: A Day In the Life of a Probation Officer (2007-03-06)
Since last summer, three police officers in Washington have died at the hands of felons who were on probation. Two of the officers were killed in car wrecks; one was shot in the head. Now lawmakers in Olympia are considering reforms to the probation system. KPLU's Austin Jenkins recently rode along with a community corrections officer to see first-hand how the state tracks felons who've been released from prison.


HIV and Rural Drug Users (2007-03-06)
Most people with AIDS in Washington live in the Seattle area. But there's a cluster of new HIV cases in rural Thurston County, and that has health officials sounding an alarm. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld explains.


Refugees in Seattle (2007-03-06)
Ethiopian restaurants and shopping malls catering to southeast Asians are evidence of refugees living in Seattle. A new report indicates the city is now fifth in the nation, in providing save haven to people fleeing their homelands. KPLU's Paula Wissel has the story.


Can Seafood Be Organic? (2007-03-05)
Northwest salmon farmers, trout breeders, and shellfish growers want to jump into the fast-growing organic industry. They're lobbying the government to set standards and begin certifying organic seafood so you can buy it. Oddly enough, some environmental campaigners are tring to "deep six" this organic expansion. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Viaduct Vote - Maybe It Does Matter (2007-03-05)
Is it worth the price of a postage stamp to have your voice be heard? Voters in Seattle may be wondering. THey have just a week left to mail in their ballots on the Alaskan Way Viaduct advisory measure. KPLU's Keith Seinfeld reports, depending on the outcome, the vote could make a big difference.


Google Vs. Microsoft (2007-03-05)
A few years ago, Strategic News Service publisher Mark Anderson was one of the first analysts to predict Google would directly compete with Microsoft. That prediction is coming true, with the launch of Google Apps Premier Edition; which is aimed at the market currently dominated by Microsoft Office. KPLU's Dave Meyer reached Mark Anderson by phone at his office in the San Juan Islands.


Hanford's Animal Carcasses (2007-03-05)
Workers at the Hanford site have unearthed an unusual remnant of the nuclear age. They dug up a railroad car filled with animal carcasses and manure. We asked KPLU's Chana Jofffe-Walt to dig up the story behind the animals.


NW Japanese-Americans in WWII (2007-03-02)
65 years ago today the federal government issued the proclamation that triggered the internment of Japanese Americans. The order targeted only the coastal portions of Northwest states. Japanese people who lived inland were allowed to stay. But even though they weren't sent away to remote desert camps, their lives were forever changed. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson brings us the stories of two Japanese-Americans who experienced the war years in Spokane, on the uneasy outskirts of internment.


Thiel on UW, WSU Basketball (2007-03-02)
Washington State and the University of Washington men's basketball teams wrap-up their regular seasons tomorrow. WSU is moving on to the NCAA Tournament. UW is likely not; for the first time in four years. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked to Art Thiel with the Seattle PI about this year's "power shift" in college basketball, and what it means for the state.


IMpeachment Measure Gets Hearing in Olympia (2007-03-02)
Washington's Governor, Senior US Senator, and other top Democrats don't want it discussed. But that didn't stop a State Senate Committe in Olympia yesterday from hearing the case to impeach President Bush and Vice-President Cheney. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


New Car Beats Global Warming Standards (2007-03-02)
Automakers say they caon't build affordable cars that meet the new standards for greenhouse gas emissions set by Washington, oregon, and eight other states. Now, a national advocacy group says it already has one. More from KPLU's environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Viaduct Vote part 5 - Lingering Questions About Money and Choices (2007-03-02)
All this week on KPLU we've been looking in detail at ways to replace Seattle's waterfront highway. Voters are facing a referendum on a waterfront tunnel versus a new elevated freeway. Many people still have lingering questions ... and we sent KPLU's Keith Seinfeld looking for some answers:


Can We Live Without It? Viaduct Series part 4 (2007-03-01)
Seattle voters are being asked to choose between building a new elevated highway along the downtown waterfront or building a new highway partially buried in a tunnel. But is a new highway really the only option? Some Seattleites are asking, "What would the waterfront look like if we took our Northwest environmental values seriously?"


Weather: El Nino to La Nina (2007-03-01)
If you're down about the wintry mix of weather we've gotten recently, just wait for mext year. Federal scientists say the current El Nino weather pattern is fading, and fiving way to its harsher sister, La Nina. KPLU's Tom Banse reports on how that affects conditions in the Northwest.


Wolf Plan (2007-03-01)
They haven't moved here yet, but the state wants to be ready for them when they do. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is planning for the day when wolves once again roam the state's river valleys and basins. More from KPLU's Paula Wissel.


Salmon Forecast Mostly Down (2007-02-28)
Most Northwest salmon stocks are still struggling to recover. That's likely to mean disappointing fishing seasons around much of the region. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Preparing for Disaster (2007-02-28)
As storm water surged over city streets and trees fell on houses last December, 911 operators in Seattle were inudated with non-emergency phone calls. It's one of the problems the city in a lengthy review of its response to the big storm. KPLU's Puala Wissel reports.


WInd Storm Review (2007-02-28)
The city of Seattle says there are a lot of things it could have done better during last December's devastating wind storm. During the storm, trees fell on homes and cars, one person drowned and more than a million people lost power. KPLU's Paula Wissel reports on the city's review of its response.


Viaduct Series - Elevated Option (2007-02-27)
The debate over Seattle's aging Alaskan Way Viaduct sometimes sounds like a school-yard brawl. Now, the politicians have asked Seattle voters to jump into the fray. At stake is a mega-project that affects highway spending across Washington. In part two of our week-long series on the viaduct vote, KPLU's Gary Davis looks at the cheaper option on the ballot - a new viaduct.


Bars with Food (2007-02-27)
Seattle Times Food Critic Nancy Leson talks to KPLU's Dick Stein about the recent influx of bars offering great food.


Viaduct Series Part Three: Tunnel "Lite" Option (2007-02-27)
The idea of moving the Alaskan Way Viaduct underground is dead in Olympia. Nevertheless Seattle is holding out hope that a pro tunnel vote will bring it back to life.In part three of our series on the Viaduct Vote, KPLU's Jennifer Wing looks at why the tunnel option has such a following in Seattle and what it would take to built it.


Five Western States Announce Global Warming Pact (2007-02-27)
Governors of five western states, including Washington and Oregon, have signed an agreement designed to cut back on pollutions blamed for global warming. KPLU's Chris Lehman reports.


Rail to Trail Deal (2007-02-27)
A major deal to trade Boeing Field for a rail line that could be turned into a hiking tail is closer to reality. KPLU's Paula WIssel reports on an agreement signed by King County, the Port of Seattle, and Burlington Northern.


Port Land Swap (2007-02-27)
A rails-to-trails land swap has been hammered out. If approved by the King County Council and Port of Seattle Commission, it will result in a biking and hiking tail from the south end of Lake Washington all the way to Woodinville. As KPLU's Paula Wissel reports, the deal could also mean improved freight train service for the region.


Higher Salary for Seattle Superintendent (2007-02-26)
Will more money attract top talent? that's what the Seattle School District is hoping. KPLU education reporter Jennifer WIng tells us the district is giving a big salary boost to whoever will become the new Superintendent.


The History of the Viaduct (2007-02-26)
When it opened more than 50 years ago, the Alaskan Way Viaduct was seen as a beautiful necklace around the city. Now, some say it's more like a noose ---ugly, unsafe and something that cuts off downtown from the waterfront. Voters in Seattle are being asked whether they favor rebuilding the structure or replacing it with a tunnel. Today, we kick off a series on the viaduct vote.


Viaduct Forum (2007-02-26)
Seattle residents are casting their vote on what to do with the aging Alaskan Way Viaduct. Ballots began arriving in the mail this week for the city's first vote-by-mail election. Last night the pros and cons of the two options before voters were debated at a downtown forum. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


Obese Children (2007-02-26)
If you're a teenager in Washington State, there is about a one in four chance you're overweight; and will stay that way into adulthood. And, according to a new report released by the University of Washington, the problem likely started before you were born. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


Governor Orders Inquirty into Highway Cable Barriers (2007-02-26)
You've probably noticed them along stretches of the interstate, cable barriers. They're designed to keep cars from crossing the median into oncoming traffic. But a recent fatal accident has the governor wondering, do they work as advertised? KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Can NASCAR Stars Turn Around Racetrack Debate in WA? (2007-02-26)
Can the King of NASCAR turn Washington lawmakers into race fans? That's the hope. Richard Petty and two other drivers were in Olympia Thursday pushing for a Northwest racetrack. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Teacher's Union Says Education Funding Needs Boost (2007-02-26)
Washington needs to spend more than 11-thousand dollars per student, per year. That's the eye-popping conclusion of a new study by the teachers union. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Siberian Tigers as Pets? (2007-02-26)
Siberian tigers are native to north eastern China and Russia. They're rare in the wild. So what's a family of four doing in Eastern Washington? As KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports, they represent an on going debate in the Northwest over the practice of keeping exotic animals as pets.


Viaduct Series: Dan Evans Q&A (2007-02-26)
Today, we kick off a weeklong series on the viaduct vote. KPLU's Paula Wissel begins with an interview with former Governor Dan Evans. He served on a state advisory panel on the viaduct, and has some interesting historical perspectives.


NW Filmmaker Hoping for Oscar This Weekend (2007-02-26)
You can root for the home team if you're planning to watch the Academy Awards this Sunday. That's because one of the nominated movies has Northwest ties. The film "Iraq in Fragments" is up for best documentary. KPLU's Tom Banse spoke to its producer.


Tax Time (2007-02-22)
April 15th is less than two months away. Have you started preparing your income tax return yet? KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


The Battle Over Payday Lending in WA State (2007-02-22)
Payday lending is a billion-and-a-half-dollar-a-year industry in Washington State and growing - rapidly. Some lawmakers and advocates for the poor want to cap interest rates on these short-term, high-interest loans. But payday lenders argue this will put them out of business. The fight has kicked-off a lobbying frenzy that's dividing majority Democrats. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


NASCAR Stars Come to Lobby For NW Track (2007-02-22)
Richard Petty. Dale Waltrip. Greg Biffle. If those names don't ring a bell, you're probably not a NASCAR fan. They're famous stock-car drivers and they're in Olympia [Wednesday night and Thursday morning] to lobby for a Northwest track. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Biodiesel Comes to the Grocer (2007-02-22)
Biodiesel is hitting the main stream. Motorists can now purchase the alternative fuel at a grocery store. More from KPLU's Jennifer Wing.


Conversation with Walter Mondale (2007-02-22)
Former US Vice President Walter Mondale has some definite opinions about what's happening in the world today; and at the age of 79, he's not shy about sharing them. In addition to serving with President Jimmy Carter, Mondale has been a presidential candidate, senator, and US ambassador to Japan. He'll talk about US foreign policy tomorrow at Pacific Lutheran University. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick spoke with him earlier this week, from his office in Minnesota.


High Court Gives Weyerhaeuser Reprieve (2007-02-22)
The Supreme Court today (Tuesday) threw out a 79 million dollar judgement against the Weyerhaeuser Company. A lawsuit brought by a smaller competitor alleged that Weyerhaueser tried to monopolize the market for alder in the Northwest. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Food For Thought: Puget Sound Area Pizza (2007-02-22)
In this week's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson talks with KPLU's Dick Stein about some of the Puget Sound area's fancier pizza joints.


Seattle Lawyer Files Suit Over Tainted Peanut Butter (2007-02-22)
A Seattle law firm is seeking to represent all people nationwide who were sickened by tainted peanut butter. The firm Marler Clark filed a class action lawsuit this week (Tues.) in federal court against ConAgra Foods. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Higher Ed Presidents Downplay "Career" Student Program (2007-02-22)
The presidents of Washington's public universities say more enrollment slots are needed. But they reject the notion that "career" students are taking up space in classrooms. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Few WA Sex Offenders Tracked by GPS (2007-02-22)
It's been a year since Washington lawmakers authorized the tracking of sex offenders with G-P-S monitors. But so far the program has yet to get up and running. Now one lawmaker is expressing his frustration. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


A Home For Shasta (2007-02-22)
The horror that played out in North Idaho in the summer of 2005 was headline-fodder for months. A convicted sex offender, a triplemurder, and an alleged kidnapping. Slowly, the media spotlight has dimmed. But for lone survivor Shasta Groene, the journeyback to normal' has been even harder you might imagine. KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports on what her community is doing to help.


Lost Opportunity (2007-02-22)
A non-profit is interested in spending millions of dollars to set up a small academy in the Seattle School District to teach poor, minority students.But as KPLU's Jennifer Wing reports, the district might not act fast enough to take advantage of the offer.


Storm Deaths - Lessons Learned (2007-02-20)
The deaths and carbon monoxide poisonings after December's big storm might have been prevented. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld has more on a conference devoted to the lessons learned.


Seattle Student Death - Updated (2007-02-20)
Grief counselors and support staff were on hand today when classes began at Seattle's Laurelhurst Elementary School. On Wednesday, a second grader at the school died from the flu. KPLU's Gary Davis reports.


China Develops Appetite for our Waste Paper (2007-02-20)
Here's something to think about the next time you blithely toss a memo in the recycle bin, or put your newspapers out for curbside pickup. Some of that paper could sail to China and back. KPLU's Tom Banse explains.


Food Waste Program Gaining Ground (2007-02-20)
Nobody feels good about wasting food. But for businesses such as restaurants, it's seemed inevitable. Now, the City of Seattle is expanding a program that helps put that food to good use. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


New Blues Releases (2007-02-20)
If you're a fan of our blues programming here at KPLU, you'll be pleased to know that there are several new releases out. Including one that comes out today. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with "All Blues" host, John Kessler, about the new offerings.


Seattle Green Factor (2007-02-20)
Seattle neighborhoods are getting greener. That's thanks to new zoning, referred to as the Seattle Green Factor. The city is bringing in experts on creative landscaping techniques with a series of workshops that continues this week. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp reports.


Tribes and State to Renew Culvert Talks (2007-02-20)
Washington and more than 20 Indian tribes have agreed to try one last time to settle a contentious lawsuit before going to trial. At question is whether the state has a treaty obligation to protect salmon runs to preserve tribal fisheries and culture. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


NASCAR Still Hoping for a Track (2007-02-20)
It's not just the Sonics that want taxpayers to help build them a new home. NASCAR is lobbying lawmakers in Olympia for a track near Bremerton. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Nursing Homes Want More Funding (2007-02-16)
Nursing homes say they need more money because the state has been skimping on payments. They're hoping for a ten-percent boost in funding this year. KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld has more.


Northwest House Price Increases Moderate (2007-02-16)
Some of the frothiness has gone out of the regional real estate market. Stats for the final quarter of 2006 show home sales decelerating and prices rising slower. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


WA House Republicans Propose Property Tax Rebate (2007-02-16)
Washington State has a nearly two-billion dollar budget surplus. Now House Republicans are proposing a one-time property tax rebate. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Thiel on NBA Gay Controversy (2007-02-16)
This weekend is the NBA All-Star game in Las Vegas. But the event could be overshadowed by a controversy involving two retired players. One recently revealed that he's gay. The other has publicly condemned the gay lifestyle. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Art Thiel of the Seattle PI about the fallout.


Animals, Emotions, and People (2007-02-16)
When you see a dog wag its tail to greet you, it sure looks like happiness. And if a cat hisses when you approach, that looks like anger. But in the world of brain-science, it's common to claim animals don't have emotions. One of the leading scientists trying to overturn that veiw recently joined the faculty at Washington State University. He spoke with KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld.


Home Loan Problems (2007-02-15)
Is the bubble bursting in the housing market? Signs indicate more and more people are defaulting on their home loans. KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Seattle Mayor Says Vote Must Go On (2007-02-15)
Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels says it's time for the state to listen to the people. He plans to campaign hard for a tunnel to replace the ALaskan Way Viaduct, as the city prepares for next month's vote. That's despite strong opposition from the governor and state legislative leaders. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Growth Spurt Seen for State Prisons (2007-02-15)
A new study projects the inmate populations in Washington and Idaho will grow at more than twice the national average over the next five years; that's according to a new study. Oregon prisons are also bursting at the seams, but growth is slowing. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


Mayor Says Tunnel's Alive (2007-02-15)
Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels says when the Alaskan Way Viaduct went up fifty years ago, it put a wall between the city and its waterfront. His message to the governor now is "tear down that wall." The mayor says he'll keep campaigning for a tunnel to replace the viaduct. More from KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp.


Vancouver Olympics to Showcase Sustainability (2007-02-15)
Organizers of the 2010 Olympic Games in Vancouver plan to make them the greenest Games ever. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Condo Conversions Changing Seattle (2007-02-15)
Seattle is experiencing an unprecedented wave of condo conversions. That's when developers buy apartment buildings and put the inividual units up for sale. The idealists among them say this is making home-ownership more attainable, and also helping to preserve older buildings. But some tenants say they're being pushed out. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp takes us inside one building going through the process.


Sonics Decide on Renton (2007-02-14)
The Sonics have picked Renton as the site for a new arena. At least that's the plan, if taxpayers fund most of the 500-million dollar project. And that's a big if. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Seattle Defends Hybrid Tunnel (2007-02-14)
The plan to revitalize Seattle's waterfront with a tunnel is dead. So say the governor and legislative leaders, after a report from the state department of transportation pointing to safety concerns. But the city still hopes to build a scaled-down tunnel to replace the crumbling Alaskan Way viaduct. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp has the story.


Hybrid Tunnel Rejected by DOT (2007-02-14)
The plan for a tunnel to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle has taken another blow. State transportation officials have rejected the idea of a smaller tunnel on the waterfront. They say it's not safe. KPLU's Bellamy Pailthorp has the story.


Undatable, Part 2 (2007-02-14)
In honor of Valentines Day, we sent KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt out to find stories of people who appear to be cursed in matters of love. Today, how do you find love in the middle of nowhere? We visit with a few of the region's "geographically challenged singles."


Listener Response to Proliferation of Tip Jars (2007-02-14)
At the end of last week's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein asked listeners for their views on the proliferation of tip jars where they never were before. Apparently the topic touched a nerve.


WSU to Advise Iraqis on Farming (2007-02-14)
Washington State University will send four staffers to the Middle East next month to teach Western farming techniquest to Iraqis. However, the American advisors will not actuall set foot inside Iraq. KPLU's Tom Banse reports.


Renton-Woodinville Rail to Trail (2007-02-13)
You may remember a few months back, King County announced it was trading its airport at Boeing Field for a rail corridor between Renton and Woodinville. Negotiations are still underway, behind closed doors. But, there's concern over ripping-out an old railroad, and converting it to a hiker and biker path. KPLU's Keith Seinfeld reports.


Governor Blasts President's Budget (2007-02-13)
It's been one week since President Bush unveiled his 2008 budget proposal. Now, state-level officials have had a chance to study it. And Governor Chris Gregoire doesn't like what she sees. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Undatable in Seattle (2007-02-13)
In honor of Valentines Day, we're asking this question, how do people find love? Are there some who are just undatable? KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt brings us the story of one Seattle woman who thought she fit into that category.


Gambling Commission Approves Historic Compact with Spokane Tribe (2007-02-12)
The Washington Gambling Commission has approved a tribal gaming compact with the Spokane Indian tribe. Supporters say it will give a much-needed economic boost to rural Eastern Washington. Opponents argue it will lead to a major expansion of tribal gaming throughout the state. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Biofuel Standards Proposed (2007-02-12)
Interest in biodiesel and other so-called "bio-fuels" is on the rise. But how do you know what you re actually getting at the pump? Soon, bio-fuels in Washington may have to meet the same kind of labeling and quality requirements as standard fuels. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


No Dirty Gold Campaign (2007-02-12)
Just in time for Valentines Day comes a campaign for socially and environmentally responsible diamonds and gold. An independent Seattle jeweler is among the backers. More from KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp.


Gas Tax Hike May Not Cover Promised Projects (2007-02-12)
Since 2003, the Washington State legislature has raised the gas tax nearly fifteen cents. That extra money was supposed to pay for hundreds of hi-priority highway projects. But now state officials say inflation in construction materials and costs has blown a one-and-a-half-billion-dollar hole in the budget. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Lawmakers Propose Review of Death Penalty (2007-02-12)
Why should a serial killer get life in prison, while other murderers get the death penalty? That question troubles some Washington Democratic lawmakers. Now they're proposing a formal review of how the death penalty is applied in the state. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


HIV Vaccine Will Be Tested in Africa (2007-02-09)
The search for a vaccine against HIV has been one of the "holy grails" of medical research. So far, the virus has proven tougher than the scientists. Yet, there are several new vaccines being tested; including a major test launched this week in southern Africa. The global headquarters for HIV vaccine research is in Seattle at the Fred Hutchinson center. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld sat down with the director, to find out about the challenges.


Ruling Restores Protections for Roadless Areas (2007-02-09)
The future of hiking or fishing in the Northwest's roadless back country just got a boost. A federal judge says the U.S. Forest Service acted illegally when it tried to open roadless areas to logging and other development. More from KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty.


Sound Captured From Undersea Vents Off NW Coast (2007-02-09)
f a volcano erupts deep under the sea, does it make a sound? The answer is. YES. And KPLU's Tom Banse has the rumble recorded several hundred miles off the Washington Coast.


Roadless Rule Restored (2007-02-09)
Environmentalists and Washington state officials are pleased with a federal judge's ruling. It re-instates Clinton-era protections for roadless areas in national forests. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


WA Senators Hear Gun Show Loophole Bill (2007-02-09)
Is there a gun show loophole in Washington State? It depends on how you define a loophole. That's what KPLU's Austin Jenkins discovered at a Senate Committee hearing yesterday.


Thiel on Sonics Streak, Arena (2007-02-09)
The Sonics finally snapped a franchise record, 15-game losing streak on the road, with their win over the Indiana Pacers this week. The team is still in last place in the Northwest Division. KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick talked with Art Thiel of the Seattle PI about whether the Sonics' losing record will affect their chances of getting a new arena built in King County.


Global Warming Suddenly a Topic in Olympia (2007-02-08)
By 2020 Washington State's greenhouse gas emissions should be back to 1990 levels. At least that's the top goal of an executive order signed yesterday [Wednesday] by Governor Chris Gregoire. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Flock Of Dodos: Debate Between Evolution and Intelligent Design (2007-02-08)
Monday is Charles Darwin's birthday. And to celebrate the father of evolution, science centers across the country are screening the same film. It's called "Flock of Dodos" and is currently playing at the Pacific Science Center in Seattle. It's a film that explores the heated debate between the science of evolution and people who believe in Intelligent Design. KPLU's Jennifer Wing speaks with the film maker and evolutionary biologist Randy Olson.


King County Global Warming Plan (2007-02-08)
In the wake of last week's United Nations global warming report, local and state officials have been showcasing their own plans for responding to climate change. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty was there when Ron Sims unveiled King County's version.


Pandemic Flu Making People Nervous (2007-02-08)
Apparently all the news coverage of bird flu in Asia and Europe is making people nervous here in Washington. The state health deparment held focus groups last year and found people wanted to know how to prepare. A media campaign starts this week. KPLU health and science reporter Keith Seinfeld has the story.


Negative Savings Rate (2007-02-08)
Are you putting enough money in the bank? Many people aren't saving much these days. KPLU's Dave Meyer talks to financial commentator Greg Heberlein.


Republicans Boycott WA Gov's Healthcare Announcement (2007-02-07)
The bipartisan shine is coming off Washington's Blue Ribbon Report on Healthcare. Yesterday key Republicans boycotted a Governor's news conference. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Students go to GRAMMYS (2007-02-07)
Fou high school students from the Puget Sound area are headed to the GRAMMY Awards in Los Angeles. They aren't competeing for a statue, but they will be performing and hanging out with the music industry's biggest stars. KPLU's Jennifer Wing reports.


Sea Lion Deaths Investigated (2007-02-07)
Why are sea lions suddenly turning up dead in Puget Sound? Thats a mystery federal and state investigators are trying to solve. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more.


Proliferation of the Tip Jar (2007-02-07)
What's with all these tip jars everywhere? on today's Food for Thought, Seattle Times restaurant critic Nancy Leson and KPLU's Dick Stein discuss the preposterous proliferation of gratuity grabbing.


Flexcar Growing with Partnerships (2007-02-06)
It started as a public-private partnership with the city of Seattle and King County nearly eight years ago, and now it's in major metropolitan areas all over the country. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has the latest on the car-sharing service, Flexcar.


Forecasted Northwest Water Supply Slipping (2007-02-06)
Here's an example of the warning, "Be careful what you wish for." A few weeks ago, many of us were wishing for calm and dry after our winter started with flooding, wind and snowstorms. But now water users are starting to become concerned about conditions turning too dry. KPLU's Tom Banse has more.


WA Not Likely to Follow Texas HPV Vaccine Mandate (2007-02-06)
The Governor of Texas has mandated a vaccine for all girls to stop the spread of a sexually transmitted virus. H-P-V - as its known - can lead to cervical cancer in women. But at least one Northwest governor says she's not inclined to follow Texas's lead. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


Predicting Air Pollution (2007-02-06)
If you prefer to be outside when the air is cleaner and less polluted, scientists are getting better at predicting when that is, from day to day. They're using a NASA satellite. KPLU science and health reporter Keith Seinfeld has the story.


Sled Dog Races Multiply in the Northwest (2007-02-06)
Sled dog racing is not just something Alaskans do to pass the winter. Almost every January and February weekend there's a dog sled competition somewhere in the Northwest. One of the most challenging starts this Friday (2/9). The 350-mile "Race to the Sky" crosses western Montana. KPLU's Tom Banse reports that sled dog racing is gaining converts around here.


Flexcar Update (2007-02-06)
If you're looking for a way to save money on parking, gas and insurance, joining a car-sharing service might be the way to go. KPLU business and labor reporter Bellamy Pailthorp has the latest on Seattle's joint-venture, Flexcar.


Completely Homegrown Biodiesel (2007-02-05)
Washington state will see it's first sizable batch of completely homegrown and processed biodiesel this year. An Eastern Washington canola farmer will send one million gallons of oil to a Seattle-based biodiesel company. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Seattle School Levy Preview (2007-02-05)
It's a lot of money, but the Seattle School District says it would be a disaster if voters reject it. Tomorrow is whn voters decide on whether to approve more than 800-million dollars in junding for the struggling school district. KPLU's Jennifer Wing has more.


WA Democrats See Political Danger in Gun Control Measures (2007-02-05)
Seattle's Police Chief wants lawmakers in Olympia to pass three gun control bills this year. Topping the list is a proposal to close the so-called gun-show loophole, which allows private gun sales without background checks. But majority Democrats appear gun-shy when it comes to gun control. KPLU's Austin Jenkins explains why.


Completely Homegrown Biodiesel (2007-02-05)
Washington state will see it's first sizable batch of completely homegrown and processed biodiesel this year. An Eastern Washington canola farmer will send one million gallons of oil to a Seattle-based biodiesel company. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Seattle Schools Recall Dismissed (2007-02-05)
A group of Seattle residents unhappy with school closure plans lost a round in court Friday. Their petition to recall five Seattle School Board members was dismissed. KPLU's Gary Davis was in the courtroom.


How to Prevent Meth Use? (2007-02-05)
How do you go abou keeping people off methamphetamine? Idaho thinks a new aggressive, "in-your-face" advertising campaign might do the trick. Washington and Oregon say that kind of approach is not for them. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Completely Homegrown Biodiesel (2007-02-05)
Washington state will see it's first sizable batch of completely homegrown and processed biodiesel this year. An Eastern Washington canola farmer will send one million gallons of oil to a Seattle-based biodiesel company. KPLU's Chana Joffe-Walt reports.


Digging Up Whales on Whidbey Island (2007-02-05)
Scientists plan to dig up the remains of several orca whales. The animals died in a notorious capture 36 years ago. Organizers hope the bodies will yield scientific data - and perhaps - redemption. KPLU environment reporter Liam Moriarty has more


Mandates Not Driving Up Cost of Health Insuranc (2007-02-02)
What should a bare-bones, basic health plan cover? In Washington, the list is long. The state requires health insurance companies to pay dozens of services. But the state's Insurance Commissioner says those mandates are not why health insurance is so expensive. KPLU's Austin Jenkins reports.


State Climatologist Urges More Action on Climate Change (2007-02-02)
Washington's state climate expert says Olympia should move more aggressively to curb greenhouse gas emissions. KPLU's Liam Moriarty has more.


Earmarking Cuts a Threat to NW Research? (2007-02-02)
The mammoth spending bill now on its way to the Senate is generating a lot of talk about those special funding grants known as earmarks. As in, the new Congress is all about getting rid of them. Among the hardest hit could be research programs at the nation's land-grant colleges. In the northwest, that means agriculture. But is the money really going away? Yes - and no. We asked KPLU's Elizabeth Wynne Johnson to sort it all out.


Super Bowl's Spiritual Side (2007-02-02)
The Super Bowl is more than just a football game. The rituals that have developed around the Super Bowl make it an event with spiritual qualities. That's the view of Dr. Joe Price, chair of religious studies at Whittier College. KPLU's G